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Higher Geography 2010 watch

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    (Original post by rosie9391)
    Are you still wanting to send me your version and I'll add anything to it? :p:
    I've just realised that I don't have my own version ... :o:

    I'd drawn a diagram but got no marks for it. :sigh:

    :puppyeyes:?

    Also do you have an answer on ocean currents questions? Sorry. :o: I'd be really really grateful (though I'm avoiding Atmosphere questions like the plague).
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    (Original post by ArcadiaHouse)
    If anyone could explain the global hydrological cycle I'd love you forever and rep you. :ninja:
    Hopefully this is somewhat helpful.

    Basically it's just a cycle of water. There is the same amount of water all the time and so none is lost. It starts with evaporation from the sea/oceans/rivers as well as transpiration from plants. This water vapour collects and forms clouds and condensation occurs when the warmish water vapour meets the cold air temperatures (I think). It's transported through wind and such and then it rains (precipitation). As it rains infiltration occurs where the water is soaked downwards through the soil, where it will eventually reach storage and groundwater flow and will return to the sea/body of water (again I think). There is also surface run-off and interception where plants and such will store the water for a short period of time.

    Basically it's just a big circle. Where water goes into the sky, learns to fly, falls to the ground where the soil will soak it up and the plants will steal some of it but it will eventually all return to where it came from.

    I pulled that out of the notes I have, so if it's not helpful or what you're looking for, sorry
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    Do you need to know the gases that make up the atmosphere and at what % by volume and such?

    Also what's everyone doing to study?
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    (Original post by Livesindreams)
    Do you need to know the gases that make up the atmosphere and at what % by volume and such?

    Also what's everyone doing to study?
    thanks for the industry notes
    the main gases in the atmosphere are nitrogen ( 78%), oxygen ( 21 %) and the 1 % is made up of argon, water vapour, carbon dioxide
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    (Original post by ArcadiaHouse)
    I've just realised that I don't have my own version ... :o:

    I'd drawn a diagram but got no marks for it. :sigh:

    :puppyeyes:?

    Also do you have an answer on ocean currents questions? Sorry. :o: I'd be really really grateful (though I'm avoiding Atmosphere questions like the plague).
    The global hydrological cycle illustrates the events through which water passes in the surface-atmosphere system and describes the circulation of water from oceans, atmosphere and land. The total volume of water in the cycle is almost always constant and can be desribed as a closed system. The cycle is powered by incoming solar energy, where the sun heats water from the oceans/lakes/rivers on the earth's surface. This water then evaporates into the atmosphere; additional water is drawn from trees and plants through transpiration (evapotranspiration). As the air rises and the temperature drops, the mositure-laden air condenses forming clouds - resulting in precipitation falling as snow/rain. Surface run-off makes it's way back into the oceans and rivers, while some water will seep into the soils know as infiltration. If the rock below the soil is permeable, then the water percolates the rock and is stored as ground water.

    Draw the diagram and label: Ocean storage (97%)--->evaporation, condensation----advection--->clouds (0.001%)---->precipitation---> ice storage (2%)---> surface run-off--->infiltration--->percolation--->ground water storage (1%)
    Rivers/Lakes (0.01%) --->evapotranspiration--->condensation--->clouds

    I might have time later to type up ocean current things but I've two exams on Monday so a bit tight for time. :o: Basically have a look at the past paper answers then add a few extra points in.
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    (Original post by stefany-a)
    thanks for the industry notes
    the main gases in the atmosphere are nitrogen ( 78%), oxygen ( 21 %) and the 1 % is made up of argon, water vapour, carbon dioxide
    Thanks

    I'm guessing a need to know that for the exam?
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    (Original post by Livesindreams)
    Thanks

    I'm guessing a need to know that for the exam?
    Its in my 'how to pass ' book but I have never seen a question asking what gasses make up atmosphere. I think if the question is on physical and human factors effecting glodal warming.
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    (Original post by stefany-a)
    Its in my 'how to pass ' book but I have never seen a question asking what gasses make up atmosphere. I think if the question is on physical and human factors effecting glodal warming.
    Right okay thanks
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    Got three questions.

    1. When it says "Glaciated Upland" can that be a Carboniferous Limestone area like the Yorkshire Dales or does it have to be Snowdonia or Cairngorms?

    2. I don't get atmosphere at all. Do we need to know all the ocean currents and the structure of the atmoshphere? And can someone explain is simple terms what these are: ITCZ, doldrums, jetstream, albedo effect, coriolis force, trade winds and westerlies.

    3. Anyone got any hints on what will come up. (Praying atmosphere is in the choice of questions).
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    how far is everyone ? I have revised paper 2 and what my teacher predicited but I have sooooooooooo much to revisie
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    (Original post by TheStuRo)

    1. When it says "Glaciated Upland" can that be a Carboniferous Limestone area like the Yorkshire Dales or does it have to be Snowdonia or Cairngorms?
    no you have you talk about corries, hanging valleys and arete etc
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    I was busy all friday, so now I have tonight, and all tomorrow. This is never going to work
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    (Original post by lackofcolour)
    I was busy all friday, so now I have tonight, and all tomorrow. This is never going to work

    me too !! :p: good times :/ :p:
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    (Original post by TheStuRo)
    Got three questions.

    1. When it says "Glaciated Upland" can that be a Carboniferous Limestone area like the Yorkshire Dales or does it have to be Snowdonia or Cairngorms?

    2. I don't get atmosphere at all. Do we need to know all the ocean currents and the structure of the atmoshphere? And can someone explain is simple terms what these are: ITCZ, doldrums, jetstream, albedo effect, coriolis force, trade winds and westerlies.

    3. Anyone got any hints on what will come up. (Praying atmosphere is in the choice of questions).


    The ITCZ is the inter tropical conversion zone. A belt of low pressure called the equatorial trough, draws the trade winds towards the equator, the convergence of this is the ITCZ, but you don't really need to know that for the exam. The main things you need to know are the air masses, the tropical maritime and the tropical continental, their characterisitics.

    well i think thats all you really need to know about it :p:
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    (Original post by TheStuRo)
    Got three questions.


    2. I don't get atmosphere at all. Do we need to know all the ocean currents and the structure of the atmoshphere? And can someone explain is simple terms what these are: ITCZ, doldrums, jetstream, albedo effect, coriolis force, trade winds and westerlies.
    ITCZ = Inter Tropical Convergence Zone, it's the band of rainy low pressure near the equator where winds meet.

    Doldrums - I don't think that's too important, it's one of the zones of divergence or something, could be wrong...

    Jetstream - That possibly a wind current?

    Albedo effect - When the solar radiation reflects off the Earth's surface, more so at the poles than anywhere else. 32% of light is this or something.

    Coriolis Force - Don't worry about it too much, it deflects winds to the right in the Northern Hemisphere and right in the Southern hemisphere, so winds all go to the left if you draw your diagram.

    Trade winds and Westerlies are some of the Global winds. Trades go from 30 degrees North and South to the Equator. Westerlies go from 30 degrees to 60 degrees.

    Hope that helps (sorry if it's not clear, haha), learn ITCZ and the albedo effect, they're important
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    Oh how I should have know that studying after Dr. Who would be a bad idea.
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    (Original post by Livesindreams)
    Hopefully this is somewhat helpful.

    Basically it's just a cycle of water. There is the same amount of water all the time and so none is lost. It starts with evaporation from the sea/oceans/rivers as well as transpiration from plants. This water vapour collects and forms clouds and condensation occurs when the warmish water vapour meets the cold air temperatures (I think). It's transported through wind and such and then it rains (precipitation). As it rains infiltration occurs where the water is soaked downwards through the soil, where it will eventually reach storage and groundwater flow and will return to the sea/body of water (again I think). There is also surface run-off and interception where plants and such will store the water for a short period of time.

    Basically it's just a big circle. Where water goes into the sky, learns to fly, falls to the ground where the soil will soak it up and the plants will steal some of it but it will eventually all return to where it came from.

    I pulled that out of the notes I have, so if it's not helpful or what you're looking for, sorry
    Thank you :awesome:
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    (Original post by rosie9391)
    The global hydrological cycle illustrates the events through which water passes in the surface-atmosphere system and describes the circulation of water from oceans, atmosphere and land. The total volume of water in the cycle is almost always constant and can be desribed as a closed system. The cycle is powered by incoming solar energy, where the sun heats water from the oceans/lakes/rivers on the earth's surface. This water then evaporates into the atmosphere; additional water is drawn from trees and plants through transpiration (evapotranspiration). As the air rises and the temperature drops, the mositure-laden air condenses forming clouds - resulting in precipitation falling as snow/rain. Surface run-off makes it's way back into the oceans and rivers, while some water will seep into the soils know as infiltration. If the rock below the soil is permeable, then the water percolates the rock and is stored as ground water.

    Draw the diagram and label: Ocean storage (97%)--->evaporation, condensation----advection--->clouds (0.001%)---->precipitation---> ice storage (2%)---> surface run-off--->infiltration--->percolation--->ground water storage (1%)
    Rivers/Lakes (0.01%) --->evapotranspiration--->condensation--->clouds

    I might have time later to type up ocean current things but I've two exams on Monday so a bit tight for time. :o: Basically have a look at the past paper answers then add a few extra points in.
    Bless your soul. :hugs:
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    (Original post by lackofcolour)
    I was busy all friday, so now I have tonight, and all tomorrow. This is never going to work
    Don't give up! I was actually not going to go and sit my prelim because I was convinced that I didn't know anything, and I got the highest mark in the class.

    I'm not trying to show off (unlike some folk on here :rolleyes:), but if you drill down tonight and tomorrow, you could still get an A or B or C, or whatever you're aiming for.

    Honestly, I studied for the same amount of time for my prelim and got an A (predicted D). It's the effectiveness, not length, of studying that counts and gets good grades.

    Good luck. :hugs: Don't panic, one full day of pure study can do wonders.
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    I'm having a complete and utter concentration fail.

    It's just not working, everything just seems to be more interesting than Geography.
 
 
 

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