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    My notes are very geared towards form/structure/language, you really have to make it explicit and evaluate or otherwise you won't get a level 5.

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    For language in symbolism in Kite Runer I'd use something like the grass in the Ghazi stadium and how it symbolises the dim mood of new Afghanistan because it's ruined unlike the grass in old Afghanistan, then say that it is also pathetic fallacy as the mood of the society comes across in nature as well.
    Form/structure is difficult to do in symbolism, but I'd say something like the kite only appears in Amir's happy childhood memories and right at the end when he finally redeems himself, despite Amir clearly being passionate about kite running. So Hosseini emphasises the kite's symbolical significance with his selective use of the kite only during happy periods in the story.

    For Gatsby I'd talk about the allegory of the Valley of ''Ashes'' for language.
    And form is easier to do in Great Gatsby, I'd do something like there is no explicit reference made to The Valley of Ashes before its appearance in chapter 2, Nick mentions New York and the 2 eggs, but not the dump site in chapter 1...... It just appears out of nowhere, which furthere emphasises its anonymity.


    It's quite simple to do with anything, you just have to go deep into it and find deeper meaning as to why the author does it. I really want an A this year, every unit I've resat I've gotten no less than that.
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    (Original post by TWF)
    :confused:I'm super confused now because what you mentioned is pretty much what I have in my Kite Runner ''endings'' notes. ''How do writers create endings in the text'', you basically talk about what made Amir reach that ending (destination). I've heard my teacher speak about journeys, I think that is definetely more specific and easier to understand. I think destination could be a combination of journeys and ending. But then again, I find myself making very similair points when talking about how writers ''create'' endings. ''Create'' basically refers to something similair to ''journey'' as in how he gets to the conclusion in the ending.... but probably also more specifically to how he constructs the narrative in the ending.



    Indeed... when you talk about endings, you also end up talking about the intended symbolical message and stuff. It's super confusing, different teachers will have different opinions I guess.... I'll avoid destinations and concentrate on the others.
    Probably why I screwed up on endings in June And I do hate how English is so subjective, I handed in a practice essay I did last year to my teacher this year and they gave it different grades :s
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    I think the key thing to do is to constantly refer your essay back to the title, and also to quote, not just short quotes to fill your sentences, but ones that will back it up or create a topic of discussion.
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    (Original post by esachica)
    See, that makes it all sound quite nice I only want a blooming C. I got 60 or something in coursework, which I think works out that I need a D in this exam which will get me a C overall. Of course I'd love to do better...but I'm aiming low! XD

    Ah yes! For Kite Runner:

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    The Slingshot:
    As a reoccurring symbol in The Kite Runner, the slingshot represents loyalty in the hands of those who use it to defend the innocent from injustice. In the course of the novel, it is seen not simply as a play toy, but as a weapon that acts to repress evil and enforce good. An evident example of this is Hassan’s use of the slingshot. As childhood friends in Kabul, Amir and Hassan are often harassed by Assef and his gang just as the other children of Kabul are. In one particular incident, Assef’s encounter with Amir and Hassan turns violent when he attempts to beat Amir for his open disloyalty to Afghanistan by taking a Hazara for a friend. However, Hassan prepares his slingshot and threatens to shoot Assef’s left eye. Hassan’s courageous stand saves them both from trouble for now. This symbol reoccurs much later in the novel, when Sohrab interrupts the fight between Amir and Assef, as he pulls out his slingshot and pleads Assef to end his assault on Amir. Sohrab’s actions demonstrate an extreme courage for a young, exploited servant.

    The Kite
    As the trophy of the kite-flying tournament, the kite can explain the unique characteristics of each individual in relation to itself, so its symbol takes on a dual meaning--one for Amir and one for Hassan. For instance Amir, especially as a child, is perpetually in pursuit of Baba’s affections. Without a mother, Amir only has Baba to look up to as a role model and so it is his sole mission to gain recognition from Baba, who seemingly has too many expectations from a mere child. Thus, to Amir the kite symbolizes the key to winning Baba’s heart. On the other hand, the kite to Hassan symbolizes the friendship and loyalty he feels towards Amir. Therefore, when confronted by Assef and his gang in the alleyway, he fears losing the kite to Assef would jeopardize that friendship and so submits to Assef’s brutality. Evidently, the motives behind both Amir and Hassan’s decisions are meant to achieve the opposite ends. This discrepancy represents the difference between two general people: the selfish and the righteous.

    The Brass Knuckles:
    As a growing boy, Assef is notorious for his cruelty to other kids. The brass knuckles he is well known for wielding is a symbol of fear in the hearts of the youngsters of Kabul. Assef’s instincts are to commit the crimes he does, but he also faces the demands of structure in society. However, Assef’s view of a favourable future is one full of crime. Thus, he preserves himself by surrounding himself with those who share his outlook, thereby maintaining his power and status in Kabul.

    There is also the pomegranate tree which is quite an interesting one to look into



    I'll get back to you about Gatsby, supposed to be writing a Chapter 8 essay! Also, do you know how to specifically hit the 'form' aspect of language, form and structure?
    Got any notes on symbolism in Auden? I can't think of any...
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    Got a D in the June paper last year, predicted an A, coursework was A grade so I came out with a C overall. I was fuming, but nothing was said at my college about a remark - is the time for this over now?

    Got Rossetti, Hardy, Pride & Prej and Curious Incident. Really hoping for a decent Hardy question on Section A
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    (Original post by OneInSolidarity)
    Probably why I screwed up on endings in June And I do hate how English is so subjective, I handed in a practice essay I did last year to my teacher this year and they gave it different grades :s
    Ah - i had the exact same problem as you - done an essay for Rossetti (narrative methods in 'a royal princess' - and my tutor and teacher graded them differently - i was so f'ed off - let's just hope the examiners know what their marking this time - one of my mates got an E in his exam, and when they got his script back - the examiner commented on his section a) i) response "no comment on A04, little alternative interpretations, but some good/specific references to lang and structure" so he got 5/21 - when his remark got 14/21. Your only assessed on A02 for that question anyway - so wtf?
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    (Original post by esachica)
    Ah yes! For Kite Runner:

    I'll get back to you about Gatsby, supposed to be writing a Chapter 8 essay! Also, do you know how to specifically hit the 'form' aspect of language, form and structure?
    Ah you absolute beaut! - had never actually considered the 'slingshot' or stupidly the 'kites' - even tho the title is 'the kite runner'? aha.
    But i was just wondering - if you had any 'full of analysis' quotes to go along with them?
    In terms of symbols - i had only thought of the pomergranate tree and blood - but i'd probably go for kites if it came up!

    In regards to your 'form' question - for chapter essays, to hit the form marks, you basically have to answer 'why that chapter is significant to the progression of the story or just why that chapter holds significance" - but as long as your language stuff is 'on the money' - your mark should be good, have faith in you esachica!
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    (Original post by thefirstnotlastsamurai)
    Ah - i had the exact same problem as you - done an essay for Rossetti (narrative methods in 'a royal princess' - and my tutor and teacher graded them differently - i was so f'ed off - let's just hope the examiners know what their marking this time - one of my mates got an E in his exam, and when they got his script back - the examiner commented on his section a) i) response "no comment on A04, little alternative interpretations, but some good/specific references to lang and structure" so he got 5/21 - when his remark got 14/21. Your only assessed on A02 for that question anyway - so wtf?
    That's actually disgraceful. Imagine all the papers he marked that didn't get sent back. Pity mine did get remarked and still came back a D - quite a while off my predicted A

    A B is looking more realistic now, ruling out half of my uni choices I think A*A*B indicates bad subject selection :\
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    (Original post by Popat21)
    Got any notes on symbolism in Auden? I can't think of any...
    No, I'm sorry! This is what I've been looking for too :| All that comes to mind is When I walked out one Evening, with the clocks and time representing age and blahhh.

    Also found this - "the deep river running on at the end of the poem represents a different, more natural way of measuring time with respect to the mechanized chiming of the clocks. The fact that the river continues to run may be auspicious for the lovers whose feeling could continue to flourish even in the most adverse conditions."

    But yeah, can hardly write a good chunk on that D:

    (Original post by thefirstnotlastsamurai)
    Ah you absolute beaut! - had never actually considered the 'slingshot' or stupidly the 'kites' - even tho the title is 'the kite runner'? aha.
    But i was just wondering - if you had any 'full of analysis' quotes to go along with them?
    In terms of symbols - i had only thought of the pomergranate tree and blood - but i'd probably go for kites if it came up!

    In regards to your 'form' question - for chapter essays, to hit the form marks, you basically have to answer 'why that chapter is significant to the progression of the story or just why that chapter holds significance" - but as long as your language stuff is 'on the money' - your mark should be good, have faith in you esachica!
    Not sure if this is what you're looking for, but I have a few quote analysis generally. Annoyingly, they're not close, CLOSE analysis! :

    Spoiler:
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    Quotation: “WHAT’S SO FUNNY?” Assef bellowed. Another rib snapped, this time left lower. What was so funny was that, for the first time since the winter of 1975, I felt at peace. I laughed because I saw that, in some hidden nook in a corner of my mind, I’d even been looking forward to this...my body was broken--just how badly I wouldn’t find out until later--but I felt healed. Healed at last. I laughed.

    Analysis: This passage is significant because this is the pivotal point in Amir’s life. When Amir fights Assef, he sacrifices his life to save Sohrab just as Hassan had sacrificed his life for Amir. The guilt Amir has been suffering from his childhood is finally lifted, and his mind is at peace. Thus, he feels healed and begins laughing. Amir believes that he has compensated for the pain he caused Hassan.

    Quotation: He was already turning the street corner, his rubber boots kicking up snow. He stopped, turned. He cupped his hands around his mouth. “For you a thousand times over!” he said. Then he smiled his Hassan smile and disappeared around the corner.

    Analysis: Since Hassan had told Amir that he would bring him the kite, he is afraid of losing the kite to Assef, because a broken vow would disappoint Amir. Consequently, Hassan chooses to suffer the consequences of Assef’s anger—thus losing his innocence. From Hassan’s actions, a large contrast in human nature is evident. Amir portrays the selfish nature of people, in which one only considers the success of one's self and disregards others. On the contrary, Hassan portrays an unrealistic view of people, which is that of relentless loyalty and purity, even in the face of one’s demise.

    Quotation: No one finds out about this, you hear me? No one. I don’t want anybody’s sympathy. Then he disappeared into the dim lobby.

    Analysis: With reputation in mind, Baba was afraid of taking chemo-medication for his cancer in case another Afghani found out. Baba made the decision to effuse the medication, and rather die than suffer a loss in status. According to Rahim Khan, Baba values honor more than anything else. If a reputable person’s misdeeds were disclosed, all would know and their name would lose its glamour.

    Quotation: I envied her. Her secret was out. Spoken. Dealt with. I opened my mouth and almost told her how I’d betrayed Hassan, lied, driven him out, and destroyed a forty-year relationship between Baba and Ali. But I didn’t. I suspected there were many ways in which Soraya Taheri was a better person than me. Courage was just one of them.

    Analysis: Apparently, Amir is afraid of telling Soraya about his past with Hassan. He foresees that doing so could deteriorate his image and chances of marrying her. The cowardice of his youth reappears, and Amir chooses to keep quite. In fact, his code of values is questionable as Amir decides to hide the truth about himself and begin a relationship with dishonesty.
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    (Original post by thefirstnotlastsamurai)
    X
    A few more

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    “That was a long time ago, but it’s wrong what they say about the past, I’ve learned, about how you can bury it. Because the past claws its way out. Looking back now, I realize I have been peeking into that deserted alley for the last twenty-six years.”

    At the outset of Chapter 1, just as the book begins, Amir writes these words. With them, he hints at the central drama of the story and the reason he is telling it. To the reader, the quotation functions as a teaser. It piques the reader’s interest without revealing exactly what Amir is talking about, and from the time period Amir mentions, twenty-six years, the reader gets an idea of just how important this moment was. As the story unfolds, we realize that the deserted alley Amir refers to is where Hassan was raped, and that this event has largely defined the course of Amir’s life since. This is what Amir means when he says that the past continues to claw its way out. Try as he might to bury it, he was unable to because his feelings of guilt kept arising. As a result, he figuratively continues peeking into the alley where Assef raped Hassan, literally meaning that he keeps going over the event in his mind.

    “A boy who won’t stand up for himself becomes a man who can’t stand up to anything.”

    Baba says these words to Rahim Khan while he is talking about Amir at the end of Chapter 3, and the quotation reveals important traits in both Amir and Baba. With these words, Baba sums up one of Amir’s major character flaws—his cowardice—and Baba shows how much value he places in standing up for what is right. Baba is reluctant to praise Amir, largely because he feels Amir lacks the courage to even stand up for himself, leaving Amir constantly craving Baba’s approval. Amir’s desire for this approval as well as his cowardice later cause him to let Assef rape Hassan. The quotation also foreshadows the major test of Amir’s character that occurs when he must decide whether to return to Kabul to save Sohrab. As Amir searches for redemption, the question he struggles with is precisely what concerned Baba: does he have the courage and strength to stand up for what is right?

    “Huddled together in the dining room and waiting for the sun to rise, none of us had any notion that a way of life had ended.” (p. 36)

    This quotation occurs at the beginning of Chapter 5, as Ali, Hassan, and Amir hide inside from the gunfire they hear in the street that signals the coup by Daoud Khan, which ended Afghanistan’s monarchy. Though the effects of this coup were not immediately apparent, the coup ushered in an era of political instability that would essentially ruin Afghanistan. The way of life Amir refers to is the lifestyle that he, Baba, Ali, and Hassan knew before the coup, when Kabul was still safe and stable. For Amir in particular this meant a relatively idyllic life spent going to school, flying kites, and playing with Hassan, made possible because Baba was wealthy. But in the years after the night Amir describes when the coup occurred, violence and murder plagued the city, forcing Baba and Amir to leave Afghanistan and with it everything they owned. As a result, almost overnight everything Amir knew growing up in Kabul changed.

    “I actually aspired to cowardice, because the alternative, the real reason I was running, was that Assef was right: Nothing was free in this world. Maybe Hassan was the price I had to pay, the lamb I had to slay, to win Baba.”

    When Amir says this, toward the end of Chapter 7, he has just watched Assef rape Hassan,and rather than intervene, he ran away. Amir says he aspired to cowardice because, in his estimation, what he did was worse than cowardice. If fear of being hurt by Assef were the main reason he ran, Amir suggests that at least would have been more justified. Instead, he allowed the rape to happen because he wanted the blue kite, which he thought would prove to Baba that he was a winner like him, earning him Baba’s love and approval. The price of the kite, as Amir says, was Hassan, and this is why Amir calls Hassan the lamb he had to slay. He draws a comparison between Hassan and the lamb sacrificed during the Muslim holiday of Eid Al-Adha to commemorate Abraham’s near sacrifice of his son to God. In this context, Hassan was the sacrifice Amir had to make to get the kite and ultimately to gain Baba’s affection

    “My body was broken—just how badly I wouldn’t find out until later—but I felt healed. Healed at last. I laughed.” (p. 289)

    This quotation occurs during Amir’s meeting with Assef as he tries to find Sohrab in Chapter 22. Assef beats Amir with brass knuckles, snapping Amir’s ribs, splitting his lip and busting his jaw, and breaking the bone beneath his left eye, but because Amir feels he deserves this, he feels relief. He thinks he should have accepted the beating from Assef years ago, when he was given the choice of saving Hassan—and likely getting physically hurt—or letting Assef rape Hassan. Since that time, Amir has struggled with his guilt, which was only made worse by the fact that he was never punished for his actions. He had even gone looking for punishment in the past, as when he tried to get Hassan to hit him with the pomegranates, because he felt then there would at least be some justice for the way he treated Hassan. But Amir’s guilt lingered until his confrontation with Assef, which despite the physical pain, made him feel psychologically healed. Thus, while Assef beat him, he began to laugh.
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    so in the exam do we talk about language,structure,form or characters,time,narrative,settin g ? blimey im confused

    kite runner
    keats
    gatsby
    rime of ancient mariner
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    (Original post by LondonLT)
    so in the exam do we talk about language,structure,form or characters,time,narrative,settin g ? blimey im confused

    kite runner
    keats
    gatsby
    rime of ancient mariner
    In the marking criteria there are 4 assessment objectives (from memory):
    AO1 - quality of writing, terminology etc
    AO2 - Language, Form & Structure
    AO3 - Alternative interpretations
    AO4 - Context

    AO1 applies to them all.
    AO2 applies to part Ai and part B
    AO3 applies to part Aii and part B
    AO4 applies to part Aii

    If the question of part B was 'How do the authors of the texts you have studies create their characters etc.' Then you would answer the question, making sure that you fulfil all the AO's

    For example (off the top of my head): In the first chapter Amir tells us about his 'past of unatoned sins' and how it 'claws its way out', this makes the reader feel sympathy for Amir as he is apparently repentant, feeling pain, consumed by guilt for the past '27 years'. However some readers will regard him with suspicion, wondering why it took him 27 years before he tried to redeem himself - this feeling perhaps further emphasised by the fact Hosseini does not disclose his past, making the reader assume it must be terrible due to the impact it's had.

    Not my best, but it hits AO2 'past of unatoned sins', AO3 'However some readers will regard him with suspicion' and maybe AO1, 'teleological progression'.
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    Could someone write me some Section B questions please? Preferably on things that have yet to come up? Would be most appreciated!
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      Does anyone have anything on Browning's "Fra Lippo Lippi"? I know it has already had a question on section A whereas other poems have not but i'm terrified of it coming up and I need some notes.

      I understand the overall stuff about art and its purpose but I don't really understand in what parts of the poem it's clear as I just read an overview of the poem to find this out. Overall it just seems like rambling.
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      Hi this is going to sound really stupid but could someone give me an example paragraph of section A (a), using destination? I am a bit miffed about how I can talk about it....
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      Can summarize the plot of small island please, i lost my notes for it and the plot summary (chapter summaries) was really helpful to me. Anyone?
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      Quick question, how many poems should you write about for section B?
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      (Original post by casio99)
      Quick question, how many poems should you write about for section B?
      2/3. It depends on the length of the poem and how much time you have.
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      (Original post by Popat21)
      2/3. It depends on the length of the poem and how much time you have.
      Thanks

      One more question regarding structure. Is it wiser to structure your section B essay on order of points or on a text-by-text basis?
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      (Original post by casio99)
      Thanks

      One more question regarding structure. Is it wiser to structure your section B essay on order of points or on a text-by-text basis?
      Definitely text-by-text. Because they don't want you to be comparing authors (but still, a little bit of this is good) it's better for A01 to go text by text with a linking point between each paragraph.

     
     
     
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