Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Are there any truly 'bad' universities in the UK? Watch

    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alibobs)
    I do know that some unis have better reputations/are more prestigious though and that is what I'm going to base my final decisions on.
    Coventry University - offer conditional 30 credits @ merit
    De Montfort University - acknowledged 03/12/10
    University of Leicester - offer! :woohoo: conditional 30 credits @ distinction
    University of Northampton - conditional 30 credits @ merit
    University of Warwick - acknowledged 26/11/10

    You are not prepared to concede that geography played the teenciest weenciest part in your decision?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ish90an)
    Source for this survey?
    Did I argue that ex-polys are completely worthless? No. Did I argue that on average top employers and top universities do have a correlation, and hence a degree was not a degree and that other factors such as uni reputation do on average, matter for top employers? Yes. Are the 2 the same? No.
    Source: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/07..._unemployment/
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    You are not prepared to concede that geography played the teenciest weenciest part in your decision?
    oh gosh yes, I meant out of my choices my final decision is going to be based on rhe other things I mentioned. All the places I applied for were choesn because they are in my localish area, should have said that before
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Yeah I'd think so, because we're a Western country doesn't mean we're exempt from having poor universities, but of course it's subjective to the criteria you're using - in TSR this is overridingly academia.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    People can be as pompous as they like but nurses, paramedics and teachers from ex-polys are usually much more socially usefull than an English graduate from 'top-rate' universities.

    (Original post by tillytots)
    Looool, I thought this so I applied as an ultimate back up insurance,turns out for them to even look at my application I have to write a 700 word essay and then another 300 on why I'd like to go to MMU, despite the fact that I really don't want to go there.
    And?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Peel)
    Yeah I'd think so, because we're a Western country doesn't mean we're exempt from having poor universities, but of course it's subjective to the criteria you're using - in TSR this is overridingly academia.
    True

    Ask Experian which are the worst universities you would get quite a different list (though with Oxbridge as the best).


    I don't think anyone's looked at the value of a qualification from a defunct institution.

    The Polys all gave out CNAA degrees

    What about a BA from London Guildhall University?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ilickbatteries)
    Oh come on, you and I both know that Cambridge and Oxford can be excepted from most general rules regarding these things.

    Besides, Cambridge is so popular that they have to give out A*AA for everything, the sheer volume of applicants is unreal.
    Not really. Most Cambridge/Oxford courses are about 5, 6 applicants per place. Take Keele medicine, it has 20 applicants per place - pretty much everybody AAA, good GCSE grades and only a small number are interviewed when compared to most Oxford and Cambridge courses.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    This includes not just people doing CS, but "Applied Computing", "IT" and the other degrees that do not offer the same skills or have the same demand as a Computer Science course. Plus, unemployment rate alone isn't the perfect indicator of a degree's worth, Economics had a higher unemployment rate in 2009 than Sociology, yet it also has a higher average graduate salary. The same is true of the comparison between Media Studies and CS.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    People may be surprised how many really outstanding people in some fields have been to some of the universities that are amongst the lowest ranked overall.

    If you wanted to work on making a groundbreaking videogame, what would you do? You'd find that the ex-polytechnics have some of the best videogame / graphic design courses.
    Or at least they are the only avenues that are available to the most able students in that field because the universities that are higher up the rankings overall don't respect videogames (nor the best of popular music) as an art form to be studied.

    Is it really clever of some of the higher ranked universities not to take seriously medias that have existed for several decades now? Or do they humbly acknowledge that they'd be no good at teaching about them? In which case maybe they could be more humble about their claims to be the elite of education.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I think the subject is more important than the university. However there are certain universities where it really doesn't matter what course you did either (Oxbridge etc.)

    I read a story in the newspapers a while back about the CEO of WHSmith. She has a degree from a low ranked uni (Bradford or Deby I think ?) anyway her competition was 3 Oxbridge grads, an Imperial grad and a York Grad. She got the job.

    Obviously you try and get into the best university you can but there are more important things.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Picnic1)
    People may be surprised how many really outstanding people in some fields have been to some of the universities that are amongst the lowest ranked overall.

    If you wanted to work on making a groundbreaking videogame, what would you do? You'd find that the ex-polytechnics have some of the best videogame / graphic design courses.
    Or at least they are the only avenues that are available to the most able students in that field because the universities that are higher up the rankings overall don't respect videogames (nor the best of popular music) as an art form to be studied.


    Is it really clever of some of the higher ranked universities not to take seriously medias that have existed for several decades now? Or do they humbly acknowledge that they'd be no good at teaching about them? In which case maybe they could be more humble about their claims to be the elite of education.
    The reason why only ex-poly's/poorer universities do video game courses is because they aren't respected post grad. If you want to be a game designer post university and actually get a decent job, it is well known that you should do CS or something similar since gaming courses are just laughed at.

    You may be right in general, but that was a poor example to use I'm afraid and perhaps I've shed some light on why 'better' universities don't do certain courses - the traditional degrees are still better to do in some cases, even though they don't relate to a post grad job as directly as a more specific degree.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Wookie42)
    The reason why only ex-poly's/poorer universities do video game courses is because they aren't respected post grad. If you want to be a game designer post university and actually get a decent job, it is well known that you should do CS or something similar since gaming courses are just laughed at.
    It's possible that a decent gaming course doesn't yet exist in this country, partly because anyone taking the time to create one is whistling in the wind in terms of getting academic respect. They're probably regarded as less worthy of study than board games by many people.

    The word 'game' is a problem to them gaining respect. Yet 'game theory', which is dubiously associated with military tactics (even though war has few rules) or chess (which has cleatly defined rules) does have respect. So why shouldn't videogames?

    A problem is that people are simply discriminatory towards videogames so such so that, instead of investigating a game that has some political /sociological aspect to it that they could easily hang academic analysis on like Bioshock, they choose to play the most very basic of videogames whenever they do play them. They like to believe the self fulfilling prophesy that all of the games that aren't awful ones where you kill prostitutes are the most basic of 'family friendly' games like Tetris and Pacman - which are practically glorified board games.

    Another problem is that academics often tend to be predisposed to reading. So they may feel that any serious storyline is hidden beneath flashy presentation.
    They may resent being in control of the character rather being continually shown a story. What they don't get is that the game itself is the 'serious' thing. There didn't even have to be a subtext about failed socialism for Bioshock to be a great game. The atmosphere alone does that. It's theatre in the most directly affecting way possible.

    Another way of looking at videogames is as abstract puzzles. They are often composed of levels and those levels may inhabit various spacial levels which may contain hidden levels. It seems incredible that philosophy has shown no wide interest in looking at how these virtual worlds (as with television and cinema) constitute different worlds within the world.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ish90an)
    I got the lists off their career service and department sites, personal contacts in some firms in various sectors and visiting a few of their fairs.
    Shell and co form a subset of top employers. It also includes IBs, Big 4 accountants, IT places like Google and MS, GSK, Rolls-Royce etc. Basically the FTSE 100 and Times 100 list.
    Do you actually have a list that can be verified, because I'm getting an overriding feeling that you're pulling things out of your arse, and the fact that you're being deliberately vague about specific engineering related firms (which is what we're discussing here) also adds to this suspicion.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Picnic1)
    It's possible that a decent gaming course doesn't yet exist in this country, partly because anyone taking the time to create one is whistling in the wind in terms of getting academic respect. They're probably regarded as less worthy of study than board games by many people.

    The word 'game' is a problem to them gaining respect. Yet 'game theory', which is dubiously associated with military tactics (even though war has few rules) or chess (which has cleatly defined rules) does have respect. So why shouldn't videogames?

    A problem is that people are simply discriminatory towards videogames so such so that, instead of investigating a game that has some political /sociological aspect to it that they could easily hang academic analysis on like Bioshock, they choose to play the most very basic of videogames whenever they do play them. They like to believe the self fulfilling prophesy that all of the games that aren't awful ones where you kill prostitutes are the most basic of 'family friendly' games like Tetris and Pacman - which are practically glorified board games.

    Another problem is that academics often tend to be predisposed to reading. So they may feel that any serious storyline is hidden beneath flashy presentation.
    They may resent being in control of the character rather being continually shown a story. What they don't get is that the game itself is the 'serious' thing. There didn't even have to be a subtext about failed socialism for Bioshock to be a great game. The atmosphere alone does that. It's theatre in the most directly affecting way possible.

    Another way of looking at videogames is as abstract puzzles. They are often composed of levels and those levels may inhabit various spacial levels which may contain hidden levels. It seems incredible that philosophy has shown no wide interest in looking at how these virtual worlds (as with television and cinema) constitute different worlds within the world.
    You're missing the point I'm afraid. Game related courses are not respected by employers because of the content of the degree - it has nothing to do with word association. It isn't that making video games is disrespected, that would be insane since it is a multi billion pound market. However, to get into a decent job related to gaming you need a CS degree since the quality of a CS graduate is far higher than someone who has done a video game course.
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TheFlyingDutchman)
    I think the subject is more important than the university. However there are certain universities where it really doesn't matter what course you did either (Oxbridge etc.)

    I read a story in the newspapers a while back about the CEO of WHSmith. She has a degree from a low ranked uni (Bradford or Deby I think ?) anyway her competition was 3 Oxbridge grads, an Imperial grad and a York Grad. She got the job.

    Obviously you try and get into the best university you can but there are more important things.

    Probably wasn't her first job either TBH.

    Can you imagine how strange it would be if selection comittees of grown adults hiring for senior jobs like that were playing TSR 'league table bingo'
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    :dontknow: Most expolys usually have a specific area where they excel in. Nursing at Huddersfield is meant to be good, as is Law at Notts. Trent, and Social Work at Bradford has a 100% graduate employment rate, which is outstanding (yes, I realise that this means nobody went on to do a masters, but it has got a large mature student rate, so this has probably got a lot to do with it.)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Wookie42)
    You're missing the point I'm afraid. Game related courses are not respected by employers because of the content of the degree - it has nothing to do with word association. It isn't that making video games is disrespected, that would be insane since it is a multi billion pound market. However, to get into a decent job related to gaming you need a CS degree since the quality of a CS graduate is far higher than someone who has done a video game course.
    Actually it doesn't even seem to matter. My bf was in the Grand Turismo team, and his degree is in economics
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kerny)
    There are numerous departments in this country which have good teaching and research, but still remain relatively unpopular
    This is so true.

    The problem here is that people on TSR, and the age group that are applying to universities in general, are immature, naive and arrogant.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    Actually it doesn't even seem to matter. My bf was in the Grand Turismo team, and his degree is in economics
    I think you've missed out 90% of the conversation we were having - I was only making the point that having a 'gaming' degree won't get you into a 'gaming' job easily, whereas a CS degree would. I didn't mean to say specific jobs only allowed for one kind of degree graduate to have a chance at all.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joinedup)
    You do know that the polytechincs used to teach to degree level, do postgrad research etc... all that changed in '92 was they gained degree awarding power and changed the name over the door.
    Lets be honest mate, almost everyone on TSR has no idea what so ever what polytechnics taught, were for or even their reputation at the time....

    Your fully correct, but I cant help but feeling pointing out the truth is a losing battle...
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
    Useful resources
    Uni match

    Applying to uni?

    Our tool will help you find the perfect course

    Articles:

    Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

    Quick link:

    Educational debate unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.