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Swords N Thorns
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#201
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#201
(Original post by James A)
As I've said before, if you want to know what you need to know / don't need to know, look at the spec. No point just going purely by the textbooks.
For some reason I never even thought of that... O_o
Thank you!
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biology911
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#202
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#202
(Original post by James A)
Where is this on the spec?

You're asking me to show you something that is implied rather than stated. Perhaps it would help if I expanded on the question under discussion.It is from an older ‘B’ Spec that was current in 2000 and only states the following in its section on tissue fluid:

“The relationship between blood, tissue fluid, lymph and plasma.”

There’s no mention of having to calculate pressure but it was perfectly in order to ask this in the actual paper. If your school has purchased Exampro, you can find the full question by applying the topic filter of “transport systems”
Similarly, the current specification refers to magnification and resolution but there’s no reference to calculation. In questions however,you can be asked to calculate magnification or object size. So experience tells us that some things are implied rather than stated.
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biology911
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#203
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#203
(Original post by Swords N Thorns)
What do we have to actually know about Meiosis?
My CGP book seems to go into a fair bit of detail compared to the Nelson Thornes one...
The Nelson Thornes book is a very good guide to what you need to know and it has the full backing of AQA. Complementing this with current past papers will give you the best idea of what you need. Your teacher should also be able to map legacy questions to the current spec, rather like the Thornes book already does but on a larger scale.
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Simran Mars Foster
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#204
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#204
JUST TO CONFIRM It's this paper where we have to know about primary secondary and tertiary in detail and not unit 1?
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F1's Finest
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#205
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#205
(Original post by Simran Mars Foster)
JUST TO CONFIRM It's this paper where we have to know about primary secondary and tertiary in detail and not unit 1?
Yeah, learn also what quartenary means.

You will find one of the past papers asking for what it means.

It usually is asked in the haemaglobin questions....
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biology911
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#206
(Original post by Simran Mars Foster)
JUST TO CONFIRM It's this paper where we have to know about primary secondary and tertiary in detail and not unit 1?
Protein structure appears quite a lot in Unit 1,invariably as part of a question on enzymes or immunity.

In Unit 2, as well as DNA/meiosis, you see it in haemoglobin/transport and a bit on how orgs are related.

Like cytology, it’s a good example of one of those things you just carry with you through the whole A level.
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Jessie-x
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#207
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Anybody have any predictions on what might be on the Biology Unit 1 and 2 exams, AQA?
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Simran Mars Foster
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#208
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#208
(Original post by Jessie-x)
Anybody have any predictions on what might be on the Biology Unit 1 and 2 exams, AQA?
I'm hedging my bets on something on immunity like the tole of B and T cells.
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biology911
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#209
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#209
(Original post by Jessie-x)
Anybody have any predictions on what might be on the Biology Unit 1 and 2 exams, AQA?

UNIT 1: enzymes, cholera, COPD, B & T (selection/cloning)

UNIT 2: haemoglobin, meiosis (variation), gills/spiracles
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omnom
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#210
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#210
(Original post by biology911)
UNIT 1: enzymes, cholera, COPD, B & T (selection/cloning)

UNIT 2: haemoglobin, meiosis (variation), gills/spiracles
What's COPD?


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Jimmy20002012
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#211
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#211
(Original post by biology911)
UNIT 1: enzymes, cholera, COPD, B & T (selection/cloning)

UNIT 2: haemoglobin, meiosis (variation), gills/spiracles
What kind if things could you get with cloning and selective


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science-oliver
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#212
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#212
Can someone explain to me cohesion tension theory please?
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biology911
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#213
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#213
(Original post by Jimmy20002012)
What kind if things could you get with cloning and selective


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By selection I mean of the B or T cells complementary to the incoming antigens. As any subsequent mitosis is always derived from these ‘chosen’ cells, it is by definition a form of cloning.
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biology911
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(Original post by omnom)
What's COPD?


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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It’s a collective term covering emphysema and long term bronchitis. Some might throw in farmer’s lung and asbestosis, but anything included has to be chronic rather than acute.
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biology911
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#215
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#215
(Original post by science-oliver)
Can someone explain to me cohesion tension theory please?
A good start would be “36 Drops of water on a penny” on YouTube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8O8PuMkiimg
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Rumaanaa
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#216
(Original post by sahdiya)
Hi I'm stuck on what I need to know about haemoglobin


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same,dont exactly understand the dissociation curve either.I get that for human haemoglobin it shifts to the right and for organisms that live in a o2 depleted enviroment it shifts to the left;but why?How do i interpret this graph?
Same applies to effetc of co2,enviroment and activity level of organism
someone please shed some light on this thankyou!
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Rumaanaa
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(Original post by science-oliver)
Can someone explain to me cohesion tension theory please?
Water is "pulled" up the xylem by the water lost through transpiration. The colum of water doesn't break because of the cohesive forces between the water molecules. Hydrogen bonds between indiviual water molecules is the force of attraction. The pulling action of transpiration stretches the water column in the xylem so that it is under tension.

yeaaaaaahh budddyyy
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Sapphire123
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#218
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#218
I made some notes for the first few topics which include transpiration if anyone wants them I can attach them or send them to you
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science-oliver
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#219
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#219
(Original post by biology911)
A good start would be “36 Drops of water on a penny” on YouTube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8O8PuMkiimg
Right okay, could you now tell me what on earth that had to do with cohesion tension theory :confused:
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biology911
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#220
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(Original post by science-oliver)
Right okay, could you now tell me what on earth that had to do with cohesion tension theory :confused:

As I said; it's a good start!
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