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    (Original post by super121)
    From the equation in the advanced notice, you can see that Na is a spectator ion, so just get rid of it. Then, split the reactants into ions (you know what chlorine in sodium chlorate had an oxidation state of 5 so it will be 2ClO3-). The same products form (minus sodium chloride), so all thats left to do is balance it.
    How come you split reactants into ions, but nor products? Btw what are ionic equations supposed to show us and how do they help us?

    Thanks!
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    Why did you minus sodium chloride?
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    (Original post by krisshP)
    How come you split reactants into ions, but nor products? Btw what are ionic equations supposed to show us and how do they help us?

    Thanks!
    They show us what is oxidised and what is reduced.
    Well, if we know how to use them, they help us by enabling us to pass the exam? :P

    (Original post by krisshP)
    Why did you minus sodium chloride?
    Because they Sodium is not involved in the reaction (Sorry, I'm really bad at explaining things)
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    (Original post by super121)
    They show us what is oxidised and what is reduced.
    Well, if we know how to use them, they help us by enabling us to pass the exam? :P



    Because they Sodium is not involved in the reaction (Sorry, I'm really bad at explaining things)
    Pass the exam hahahaha lol

    Let's hope they don't give a scary question like this in the exam.

    If sodium is a spectator ion, why did you get rid of the chlorines that are ended up being with Na?
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    (Original post by krisshP)
    Pass the exam hahahaha lol

    Let's hope they don't give a scary question like this in the exam.

    If sodium is a spectator ion, why did you get rid of the chlorines that are ended up being with Na?
    You're not really getting rid of it because it balances with the other chlorines.
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    (Original post by super121)
    You're not really getting rid of it because it balances with the other chlorines.
    So with ionic equations the reactants are expressed as ions if they are aqueous and the products are never expressed as ions? The spectator ions are ions which have had no change in oxidation state and are not displayed in the ionic equations right?

    Thanks
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    for nucleiphilic substitution, has someone got good way of explaining it to me when it is an a nuclepohile molecule cuch as h20. The main part I don't get is where the + comes from on the O (page 292 CI)
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    (Original post by Welbeck)
    for nucleiphilic substitution, has someone got good way of explaining it to me when it is an a nuclepohile molecule cuch as h20. The main part I don't get is where the + comes from on the O (page 292 CI)
    http://www.chemguide.co.uk/mechanism...water.html#top
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    (Original post by super121)
    Same method


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Heya could you help me with this one question please? I have an idea of what it's supposed to look like but I can't execute it properly.

    Ignore whatever I've drawn!
    Attached Images
     
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    (Original post by krisshP)
    So with ionic equations the reactants are expressed as ions if they are aqueous and the products are never expressed as ions? The spectator ions are ions which have had no change in oxidation state and are not displayed in the ionic equations right?

    Thanks
    Hey sorry I saw your message a bit late! but someone's already helped you out so its all well.

    Yeah with ionic equations first thing you do is:
    • write out a balanced equation of the chemical reaction
    • then you write a full ionic equation. To do that: you split all the aqueous reactants and products into their respective ions (don't forget to balance those out based on the balanced equation you previously wrote out)
    • REMEMBER: any solid product will stay the same, and won't split into ions.
    • Then you cancel out any ions which are the same on both sides.
    • Finally always always put the states.


    And just a simple shortcut: for all neutralisation reactions of an acid-alkali titration you always get this: H+ + OH- --> H2O as the ionic equation.

    It might also be a good idea to make note of common ions that appear every now and again. Like sulfate is SO4^2- and carbonate is CO3^2-, and oxide is O^2-
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    (Original post by Welbeck)
    to produce a aldehyde, do you do reflux then distil but for carboxylic acid, do you reflux, distil and reflux or just reflux? (obviously with acidified potasium dichromate)
    Aldehyde: Distill immediately with NO reflux
    Carboxylic acid: Reflux
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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    Heya could you help me with this one question please? I have an idea of what it's supposed to look like but I can't execute it properly.

    Ignore whatever I've drawn!
    What you have drawn is correct, the would be without a catalyst. For the one with the catalyst, draw another line that is a bit lower (to show that the activation energy is lower).
    To show the enthalpy change, just draw a vertical arrow from the reactants to the highest point on the curve.
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    (Original post by super121)
    What you have drawn is correct, the would be without a catalyst. For the one with the catalyst, draw another line that is a bit lower (to show that the activation energy is lower).
    To show the enthalpy change, just draw a vertical arrow from the reactants to the highest point on the curve.
    Something like this? I worked it out, but I'm still not convinced if I'll get full marks for it
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    (Original post by StephenNaulls)
    Aldehyde: Distill immediately with NO reflux
    Carboxylic acid: Reflux
    Hey when I speak about rate of reaction etc, does it sound better to say "more collisions per unit of time" or "frequent collisions" because in every mark scheme its a different story!
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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    Something like this? I worked it out, but I'm still not convinced if I'll get full marks for it
    Yea, it's correct, by delta H would be for the arrows in the middle
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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    Hey when I speak about rate of reaction etc, does it sound better to say "more collisions per unit of time" or "frequent collisions" because in every mark scheme its a different story!
    Either. I prefer "frequent collisions" but both are fine.
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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    Hey sorry I saw your message a bit late! but someone's already helped you out so its all well.

    Yeah with ionic equations first thing you do is:
    • write out a balanced equation of the chemical reaction
    • then you write a full ionic equation. To do that: you split all the aqueous reactants and products into their respective ions (don't forget to balance those out based on the balanced equation you previously wrote out)
    • REMEMBER: any solid product will stay the same, and won't split into ions.
    • Then you cancel out any ions which are the same on both sides.
    • Finally always always put the states.


    And just a simple shortcut: for all neutralisation reactions of an acid-alkali titration you always get this: H+ + OH- --> H2O as the ionic equation.

    It might also be a good idea to make note of common ions that appear every now and again. Like sulfate is SO4^2- and carbonate is CO3^2-, and oxide is O^2-
    WTF are you serious? I thought you just split all aqueous reactants into ions? This is so bloody confusing!
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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    Hey sorry I saw your message a bit late! but someone's already helped you out so its all well.

    Yeah with ionic equations first thing you do is:
    • write out a balanced equation of the chemical reaction
    • then you write a full ionic equation. To do that: you split all the aqueous reactants and products into their respective ions (don't forget to balance those out based on the balanced equation you previously wrote out)
    • REMEMBER: any solid product will stay the same, and won't split into ions.
    • Then you cancel out any ions which are the same on both sides.
    • Finally always always put the states.


    And just a simple shortcut: for all neutralisation reactions of an acid-alkali titration you always get this: H+ + OH- --> H2O as the ionic equation.

    It might also be a good idea to make note of common ions that appear every now and again. Like sulfate is SO4^2- and carbonate is CO3^2-, and oxide is O^2-
    What do you mean by this?
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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    Hey sorry I saw your message a bit late! but someone's already helped you out so its all well.

    Yeah with ionic equations first thing you do is:
    • write out a balanced equation of the chemical reaction
    • then you write a full ionic equation. To do that: you split all the aqueous reactants and products into their respective ions (don't forget to balance those out based on the balanced equation you previously wrote out)
    • REMEMBER: any solid product will stay the same, and won't split into ions.
    • Then you cancel out any ions which are the same on both sides.
    • Finally always always put the states.


    And just a simple shortcut: for all neutralisation reactions of an acid-alkali titration you always get this: H+ + OH- --> H2O as the ionic equation.

    It might also be a good idea to make note of common ions that appear every now and again. Like sulfate is SO4^2- and carbonate is CO3^2-, and oxide is O^2-
    But I thought you only split aqueous reactants?

    This is so confusing ahhhhhhhhh
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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    Something like this? I worked it out, but I'm still not convinced if I'll get full marks for it
    Does a catalyst not need 2 'humps'? As they work by providing an intermediate step, so there are effectively 2 different activation enthalpies, both of which are lower than the original.
 
 
 
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