Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I'm applying for primary PGCE in September
    Interested in applying to Cambridge, Reading and Bath Spa so need to narrow it down to two! I want to do the SEN specialism at Reading as I want to be a SEN teacher ultimately but might apply for the early years stream at Cambridge as really interested in teaching reception/year one/year two. I have a years experience working as a T.A in a unit for children on the Autistic Spectrum as a placement as part of my degree and have worked at a Saturday club for the past year for children with additional needs and worked at a holiday club for 5 years for children with additional needs but mainstream experience is more lacking - I sometimes work with mainstream children in the holidays at a holiday club, I have helped run a rainbow group for the last year, I helped one day a week for half a year in a year one class, but that was two years ago so am going to do two weeks in a mainstream class in September which I think I have lined up to pass the requirement of 10 days mainstream in the last year.
    More worried about my degree though - I'm doing social sciences so a mix of sociology, politics, education and psychology - so no national curriculum subjects and only have RS as a national curriculum subject at A-level so think this might hold be back.
    Really worried about the interviews too, I always mess them up! think I'm going to try get on with my PS this summer.

    Anyway good luck to everyone applying!! Would love to hear from anyone applying to the same places as me, or interested/specialising in SEN.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mango93)
    Hi, I'm really stuck: I have managed to find a school willing to let me do 5 days of observations in September (hallelujah!) but they have asked me to get a CRB check... I don't know much about CRB except that I can't just apply for myself, right? I emailed back asking for the form and got this:
    Here is the link to beginning the CRB procedure (now DBS). We don’t do it as it needs to be done through the official system.

    https://www.gov.uk/disclosure-barring-service-check/overview

    But that's where it says you can't do it yourself! Am I missing something really obvious here? Please help!
    CRB's have just moved over to an online form and i get the feeling that most places don't understand it properly, but basically you should receive a code and link from the school that identifies it to them. Then you fill in all the form online by yourself, then you take in the evidence to show them and then it is all processed I've just done one - well done all the online bit, just need to show evidence and that's how it was for me. Hope that helps.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Marcusian)
    If it's any help I am still learning, an intermediate welsh speaker and observed Year 7 Second language Welsh classes and was fine in terms of how my welsh is. I also have a five year old son who is in a Ysgol Gymraeg and we both understand each other fine. If I am not successful in the next couple of years in the English medium system I am hoping by then I would be fluent enough to try Welsh medium, I am definitely doing it as a my second subject though anyway. In terms of jobs it's definitely worth doing it in Welsh medium.
    Yeah that's what I thought it would be better to do it through Welsh especially if I want to work in Wales. I know the uni does an English Medium one but virtually all the primary schools around here are very Welsh so if English students do a PGCE here I'm sure they don't end up teaching around here.

    One thing that worries me is the academic writing etc in Welsh. I've not written in Welsh since my GCSE which I got 5 years ago. 6th form and uni were all in English.

    I mean I can speak Welsh fine and my writing is probably good enough for teaching, but for academic essays I might struggle!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jeffercake)
    Yep
    I'm also applying for Teach First in June, but if I'm unsuccessful in that, I will be applying for a PGCE. I want to do secondary English.
    I have lots of good experience so far, I've volunteered in three secondary schools, including a good school, a satisfactory school and a school that 'requires improvement'.
    Could you please tell me the difference between Teach First, School Direct and PGCE?

    I know about the PGCE but I am confused about Teach First and School Direct.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hello guys! I'm hoping to do my PGCE in Primary School teaching after my last year of my Undergrad course (Theatre and Performance) at Warwick. Just wondering when you guys are planning on applying for your courses? I'm hoping to stay at Warwick but am a bit nervous about doing the application without any help!

    Leah x
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Could you please tell me the difference between Teach First, School Direct and PGCE?

    I know about the PGCE but I am confused about Teach First and School Direct.
    The following is fromt he top of my head so anyone, please feel free to correct me as I'ms ure there may be some faults in what I'm saying.

    Teach First is a charity, you must be predicted a 2.1+ to apply and must go through a course of exams/interviews. Also, as it is a charity working in underdeveloped/poor preforming schools, they will send you where they need you ie. they will not always put your needs first in terms of what and where you want to teach. Just because you have a degree in Biomedical Sciences, does not mean you will teach Sciences (at secondary), they will look at your A-Levels too and decide ie. having done History at A-Level they might want you to teach that (heard that from the Teach First thread anyway, sounds a little weird to me though..). Also, I don't think you have any tuition fees to pay, it's like training on the job. School direct I think you must have had worked for 3ish years minimum to qualify and enables you to also train on the job and earn money whilst you do so. It is offered by schools and the school decides if they want to consider your application. I think you get less dedicated support this way, hence the prerequisite for 3 years work experience (in any field).
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Feartheunknown)
    The following is fromt he top of my head so anyone, please feel free to correct me as I'ms ure there may be some faults in what I'm saying.

    Teach First is a charity, you must be predicted a 2.1+ to apply and must go through a course of exams/interviews. Also, as it is a charity working in underdeveloped/poor preforming schools, they will send you where they need you ie. they will not always put your needs first in terms of what and where you want to teach. Just because you have a degree in Biomedical Sciences, does not mean you will teach Sciences (at secondary), they will look at your A-Levels too and decide ie. having done History at A-Level they might want you to teach that (heard that from the Teach First thread anyway, sounds a little weird to me though..). Also, I don't think you have any tuition fees to pay, it's like training on the job. School direct I think you must have had worked for 3ish years minimum to qualify and enables you to also train on the job and earn money whilst you do so. It is offered by schools and the school decides if they want to consider your application. I think you get less dedicated support this way, hence the prerequisite for 3 years work experience (in any field).
    You don't need 3 years experience for SD. You need ample work exp (can't remember how much) only for the salaried route, but for the fee paying route (that I'd imagine most of us will be applying for) it's the same requirements as a PGCE, roughly. It's not less dedicated either.

    I don't know much about Teach First. All I know it is very competitive with a long application process I believe. I did read you are able to teach a subject other than your degree as long as you have a good grade in it at A-Level. Last time I looked it didn't include a couple of national curriculum subjects. I remember History didn't count. I don't know why, and it may have changed. Yeah here you go:

    (Original post by Teach First)
    For secondary teaching eligibility participants will require a degree (2.1 or above) relating to one of the following secondary national curriculum subjects:

    Business Studies
    Design & Technology*
    English*
    Geography
    History
    Computer Science & ICT*
    Maths*
    Modern Foreign Languages
    Music
    Religious Education
    Science*
    or an A*, A or B A-Level (or equivalent) in any of the subjects asterisked above. Please note, to be eligible to teach Science two relevant A-Levels are required.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Airfairy)
    You don't need 3 years experience for SD. You need ample work exp (can't remember how much) only for the salaried route, but for the fee paying route (that I'd imagine most of us will be applying for) it's the same requirements as a PGCE, roughly. It's not less dedicated either.

    I don't know much about Teach First. All I know it is very competitive with a long application process I believe. I did read you are able to teach a subject other than your degree as long as you have a good grade in it at A-Level. Last time I looked it didn't include a couple of national curriculum subjects. I remember History didn't count. I don't know why, and it may have changed. Yeah here you go:
    Thanks for the info. So if Teach First is so competitive, you have no control over what/where will you teach, why go for this route? Is it because it has no fees?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Thanks for the info. So if Teach First is so competitive, you have no control over what/where will you teach, why go for this route? Is it because it has no fees?
    I don't know much about it if I'm honest. I'm not eligible to apply. I would imagine the lack of fees has something to do with it. I've just had a look - it's two years long, with a full time salary paid and you finish with a PGCE. So yeah, lack of fees makes it appealing I guess.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi all,

    Havn't posted for a while but I've been keeping up to date with the changes happening within the education sector and I just wanted to get people's opinions on the following article:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/...bath-childcare

    Obviously, with the majority of us on here hoping to embark on a PGCE at number of Universities, this article doesn't fill me with confidence...

    The joys of Michael Gove eh...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Also, for School Direct or SCITT you still get University support, usually 1 day a week with the other 4 days being in whichever school you are placed in. However you should check whether the particular SD or SCITT provider includes a PGCE as well as QTS as not all do.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Anyone know if you have to do CRB checks through the school you're going to do work experience at or is there some service where I could pay to get one done over the summer? Was under the impression that CRB checks weren't open to the individual and had to be done through an organisation (e.g. employer).
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by StandardUsername)
    Anyone know if you have to do CRB checks through the school you're going to do work experience at or is there some service where I could pay to get one done over the summer? Was under the impression that CRB checks weren't open to the individual and had to be done through an organisation (e.g. employer).
    You usually have to get them done through individual organisations.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi guys, planning on applying for a PGCE Primary this year to start next, just a little sketchy on the way to do it. Is it through UCAS? When exactly do you have to apply? Are there tuition fees like in Masters or is it the same system as undergrad i.e. student finance?

    I'm just so scared. I just got my grades back for last year and I'm averaging a low 2.1 so will be hoping to work really hard this year and pull my grades up. I think I can achieve a first (MAYBE) since I know how unfocused I was and how little revision and prepartion I did. If I pull my socks up I'm sure things can change dramatically, but balancing that with an application as important as this seems a bit daunting if you know what I mean. Scared!!

    Also if anyone knows, is getting experience in different schools important?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Search "get into teaching". There are two routes - gttr (uni for a year) or school direct itt -


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Getting experience is essential - and it's very competitive to get on a course as places are limited. A 2-1 is probably going to be a big help. Look at some of the posts re preparing for interview - I've summarised some of the requirements on one which show you just how much is required just to get on the course - it's a lot.
    If you want to do it go for it - make sure you are up to date with the requirements - that's more important than applying before the 1 December deadline. Good luck.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I am getting some school experience arrange at 2/3 schools for the whole of september and some october. In addition, I am trying to do some volunteering with a local scouts group. Will this be enough? Also, what volunteering are you doing (or have you done)?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi guys. This thread is proving to be quite helpful!

    I have a few questions about my situation. Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

    I am from Ireland so I will be applying for the PGCE (Primary) '14 intake as an EU student. I am hoping to apply to Strathclyde, Bangor and 1 more university. I know that the courses are quite competitive in terms of applications.

    My Bachelors degree (2.2) is largely unrelated but did contain many modules that directly relate to Primary Education. I recently completed 2 weeks observation in an Irish primary school. I have also taught ESL full time for 2 years at primary school level and 6 months at middle school level, both in South Korea. By the time the course starts I will have added another year of primary school ESL teaching experience, albeit in a different country.

    Will this be enough experience or should I look to gain more during my holidays? Also, can any Irish applicants give me any advice re: fees?

    Thanks in advance!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yahowho)
    Hi guys. This thread is proving to be quite helpful!

    I have a few questions about my situation. Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

    I am from Ireland so I will be applying for the PGCE (Primary) '14 intake as an EU student. I am hoping to apply to Strathclyde, Bangor and 1 more university. I know that the courses are quite competitive in terms of applications.

    My Bachelors degree (2.2) is largely unrelated but did contain many modules that directly relate to Primary Education. I recently completed 2 weeks observation in an Irish primary school. I have also taught ESL full time for 2 years at primary school level and 6 months at middle school level, both in South Korea. By the time the course starts I will have added another year of primary school ESL teaching experience, albeit in a different country.

    Will this be enough experience or should I look to gain more during my holidays? Also, can any Irish applicants give me any advice re: fees?

    Thanks in advance!
    Have you thought about applying to St Marys in Twickenham as a lot of irish people go there?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by polka_dott)
    Have you thought about applying to St Marys in Twickenham as a lot of irish people go there?
    Hi! Well, the fee levels and cost of living are significant factors that I am taking into account. Tuition fees in England are usually in the region of £9000, as opposed to <£2000 in Scotland and <£4000 in Wales (if I qualify for the fee grant which I'm not certain of yet).
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.