Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

I've got a degree, I shouldn't be stacking shelves Watch

    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by firetigertron)
    I am salaried £30K I get paid overtime at £15 an hour, I got a 2.5K bonus at the beginning and I will get a year of end bonus (prob around 3K)and if i go offshore i get paid extra on top of that..... i hope to earn 40K this year.
    Thats hardly megabucks...

    Aldi's grad scheme is £40k starting.

    Accenture grads gets get £31,500 and a £10k sign on (although admittedly thats split into two payments in the first year).

    Bugger it when I started in the public sector five years ago having completed my undergrad I was on £28k, and I bet my pension benefits were better :P oh and I didn't have the expense of living in London.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jjj90)
    It's all a moot point anyway!

    There aren't even many shelf stacking jobs! This isn't an issue, not one that I've experienced anyway, people not wanting to work in a supermarket etc. I know several people that have not got a job since University and it isn't because of their attitude, it's down to the almost complete lack of jobs (in my town anyway) and the fact that a lot of stores seem highly reluctant to employ anyone with a degree because they're 'over-qualified'. In fact I found that at the jobcentre I was actively dissuaded from looking for retail work because of this!

    The best advisers at the Job Center try and help you on the way to a CAREER not just a job.

    I think this whole article is a load of nonsense. I think everyone having a go at the unemployed (Britain's new underclass) need to get a grip. How can anyone bemoan this person the right to study photography and the right to pursue a career in that field??

    This is a very cold country, it's all about money, somebody is on JSA in the few months following university and people say all sorts of ****, the whole "he sits on his arse whilst the tax payer blah blah blah" attitude is tearing through this country like the plague. Bitter nobodies, stuck in a dead end job, 9 to 5, think they have a right to pass judgement and tell people how to live their lives. Well it doesn't wash with me, the HUGE majority of graduates will go on to pay taxes for the VAST majority of their lives so don't give me the whole pitiful taxpayer bull****.

    I do hate where this country is going and I hate the attitude that so many people harbor towards the unemployed.
    were you actually on jsa yourself?

    how was it?

    what were the advisers like?
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kratos90)
    Let's be honest the main problem with grads with good degrees is that they have no direction and don't know what they want to go into. They think, 'I'm going to get an excellent degree in (Maths, Economics, Engineering etc)', because these types of degrees open up so many opportunities or so we are told. But they get their degree and apply for this here or that there and have no real conviction behind what they want to do. I'm guilty of this too.

    Let me tell you the most successful grads are not always the most intelligent and don't always have the best degrees. They are the ones who know exactly what they want to go into. They get work experience in this area, they join societies that are related to this area. I know loads of people from sixth form in my Accounting class who wanted to go into accounting since then. They got work experience, applied for jobs early, got interviews, knew what to talk about, knew what they would be doing, what they wanted to achieve and had genuine interest in their field. They had clear direction. At least three people in my small class at a state school sixth form went on to work for the Big 4 Consultancy firms, because they knew they wanted to do it since then. They had clear direction.

    It doesn't just apply to accountancy graduates, it is the same in any field.
    That's the key part, I think. You trust your parents, you trust your teachers, and do as you're told. Your parents have no idea what it's like starting a career these days because (presumably) they'll have started theirs decades ago when degrees weren't so prevalent. Your teachers incentivise you to study hard by telling you it'll make your next stage easier, and their responsibility for you ends after A Levels. Plus they too started their careers decades ago or if they are young enough teaching is all they know.

    This is why I have sympathy for someone who has trusted people they had no reason to distrust. Even politicians, who hail education as a top priority, you probably have no reason to be so cynical at that age. They've been lulled into a false sense of security by people who really should have been more honest, or at the very least not assumed everything will be the same as it was for them.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Whenever there's a story like this it's always people who did degrees like Media Studies/Film/Photography/Art courses; never those who actually did useful degrees with skills employers value.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CEKTOP)
    1. Stacking shelves is a physically demanding job.
    Well it isn't really compared to jobs that are deemed physically demanding such as brick-laying or masonry.

    However what has that got to do with that I said? There is nothing so physical about the job that requires a certain level of strength. Provided that the applicant is able to walk around with a school back full of books for 5 days of the week, they already meet the 'physical demands' of stacking shelves.

    2. You cannot pay less than minimum wage.
    Well you can, it just happens it is illegal to do so, though there is no barrier preventing anyone from paying someone below the legal requirement.

    However, that is besides the point, as indeed is this entire second statement since I mentioned absolutely nothing to do with paying below minimum wage.

    3. Nobody expects loyalty from a shelf stacker, everybody understands that they will be out the door as soon as they find something even marginally better. The point here lies in the fact that there are thousands of people who would be happy to stack shelves coming from all over the EU.
    Again, not the point. Do you think that the likes of Asda is full of shelf stackers from the shelf stacking positions right up to the managerial roles? Businesses need experienced staff who know how the business works from ground level up, a 15 year old has more potential to stay and work their way through the ranks than a 21+year old who has a degree and will be looking for other jobs all the time.

    Regardless of how easy or unskilled a job may be, it always requires time and money to train new staff, that can be from putting through paper your to the new employee not working efficiently as they are only learning the basic duties. Employers do not have a mentality of 'we don't give a care because we can fill this job twice of before the day if through.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bestofyou)
    Well it isn't really compared to jobs that are deemed physically demanding such as brick-laying or masonry.

    However what has that got to do with that I said? There is nothing so physical about the job that requires a certain level of strength. Provided that the applicant is able to walk around with a school back full of books for 5 days of the week, they already meet the 'physical demands' of stacking shelves.



    Well you can, it just happens it is illegal to do so, though there is no barrier preventing anyone from paying someone below the legal requirement.

    However, that is besides the point, as indeed is this entire second statement since I mentioned absolutely nothing to do with paying below minimum wage.



    Again, not the point. Do you think that the likes of Asda is full of shelf stackers from the shelf stacking positions right up to the managerial roles? Businesses need experienced staff who know how the business works from ground level ume.p, a 15 year old has more potential to stay and work their way through the ranks than a 21+year old who has a degree and will be looking for other jobs all the ti

    Regardless of how easy or unskilled a job may be, it always requires time and money to train new staff, that can be from putting through paper your to the new employee not working efficiently as they are only learning the basic duties. Employers do not have a mentality of 'we don't give a care because we can fill this job twice of before the day if through.
    You clearly have no idea what shelf-stacking involves. Most of these jobs are in huge warehouses and involve you walking around for 8 hours straight with boxes in your hands, not retail stores - warehouses. Try doing that sometime.

    There is a barrier, your employees can easily screw you over low pay and report you to the authorities, so baying below the minimum wage always involves risk, lots of people get fined and/or lose their licenses over that.

    There is almost no upward mobility in large chain supermarkets - most managers are hired via graduate programmes while shelf stackers can stack shelves for years without getting closer to managerial positions.

    These jobs require a minimal amount of on the job training , in the grand scale of things these expenses are negligible. Working conditions are just too poor to justify any loyalty to the firm.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    Quite possibly. I was surprised to see the link he showed me for starting salaries..... But after a bit of digging they seem to be the exception rather than the rule.
    Yes. ~£40,000 is a fairly standard starting salary for a small/mid-sized E&P company, based on what people on my course who got jobs with such companies were offered. They have to offer the highest salaries as they probably have the worst overall career prospects. The bigger oil companies tend to offer a little bit less because they instead offer much better career prospects and get a lot of applicants regardless of how much money they'd offer (although I was at one interview at a big oil company whose starting salary plus joining bonus was over £40,000). The contractors tend to offer salaries in the low-mid thirties region nowadays, again based on what people on my course were offered.

    Also oil companies tend to offer a very good work-life balance. The place I'm at for example only does a four and a half day week, and I've worked at other companies who have done things like every second Friday off, or 45 days holiday a year.

    I think what have it away though is the calibre of those selected tend to be of the kind of people who don't go on a website and start bragging.
    Possibly. I noticed he says he gets £15 an hour overtime. Well, that's less than his standard hourly rate, assuming he works a 37.5 hour week.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hopple)
    That's the key part, I think. You trust your parents, you trust your teachers, and do as you're told. Your parents have no idea what it's like starting a career these days because (presumably) they'll have started theirs decades ago when degrees weren't so prevalent. Your teachers incentivise you to study hard by telling you it'll make your next stage easier, and their responsibility for you ends after A Levels. Plus they too started their careers decades ago or if they are young enough teaching is all they know.

    This is why I have sympathy for someone who has trusted people they had no reason to distrust. Even politicians, who hail education as a top priority, you probably have no reason to be so cynical at that age. They've been lulled into a false sense of security by people who really should have been more honest, or at the very least not assumed everything will be the same as it was for them.
    I agree completely. You get told how important qualifications are (which they are) but you don't get enough advice on how important work experience is, interships and the stages involved in getting into a particular area. Deloitte for example, require 4 weeks work experience; can be in any area and doesn't have to be in the same period of time. Work is very very different to study, and qualifications don't prepare you well enough for the world of work. Students need to be encouraged to join societies, get jobs/placements, practice interview skills etc. not just pass exams.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smack)
    Possibly. I noticed he says he gets £15 an hour overtime. Well, that's less than his standard hourly rate, assuming he works a 37.5 hour week.
    I did wonder that.

    But if its 38 hours that'd be £15,18, which is fair to round down to £15.

    I'm just confused by their first post spouting that its a mega wage, and it'd pretty good as a grad, but hardly scary high money.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I have always been told it's rude to wave your salary around in the air. I think this thread has reaffirmed that.

    But yeah, if you are graduating from Derby with a degree in Photography you don't really have a right to complain about career prospects.

    I myself have looked for degrees with industrial placements (economics) and hope to get into internships through other summers whilst there. Last summer I work shadowed at KPMG and this year I'm planning to apply to a Goldman Sachs shadowing experience for summer 2014. I know that if I don't do this, I wont really get a sense for what line of work I'd be interested in upon graduation (either with a BSc or an MSc) and may end up making a horrible career choice.

    If I didn't take these experiences, I wouldn't feel as confident securing employment after university. And I am not planning to wear a McDonald's uniform ever again.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.