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    I can go on for hours talking about medical history, ethical issues etc...

    but when it comes to NHS , I just don't know where to start
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    (Original post by star10159)
    I can go on for hours talking about medical history, ethical issues etc...

    but when it comes to NHS , I just don't know where to start
    Oh wow that's funny as I'm exactly the opposite.

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    (Original post by star10159)
    I can go on for hours talking about medical history, ethical issues etc...

    but when it comes to NHS , I just don't know where to start
    Opposite for me! Lol


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    (Original post by RadioheadAnton)
    I seem to know nothing about anything :s. Would anyone recommend the Ace Medicine course?
    I'm planning to go on the ace medicine course.

    The reviews sound really good!
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    (Original post by star10159)
    I can go on for hours talking about medical history, ethical issues etc...

    but when it comes to NHS , I just don't know where to start
    Lool and I'd have blank face when talking about medical history
    Can we go through a few pointers ?
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    (Original post by RadioheadAnton)
    I seem to know nothing about anything :s. Would anyone recommend the Ace Medicine course?
    I have a friend who went on the course last year and ended up getting an offer from St George's! She really recommended the course
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    You know if we're talking about work experience in an interview, and we use examples, should we avoid examples we already mentioned in our PS, or could we use that example and elaborate more on it?
    Eg/ if they ask us to describe a memorable patient/case we encountered or something along those lines. Or if they asked 'tell me what you learned in work exp'.
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    Question:

    "A man has been responsible for taking care of his wife who is in a vegetative state for 6 years after a car accident. She can breathe on her own but that is the extent of her abilities. He requests that her feeding tube be removed. What should you, as her physician do? Why?"
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    (Original post by Joannywhite)
    Question:

    "A man has been responsible for taking care of his wife who is in a vegetative state for 6 years after a car accident. She can breathe on her own but that is the extent of her abilities. He requests that her feeding tube be removed. What should you, as her physician do? Why?"
    As a physician, I would firstly talk to her husband, and empathise with his current predicament. This scenario is rather complex, and can not be given a concrete decision in such a rush. Therefore, it would need additional comments from members of my multi-disciplinary team (nurses, Juniors, consultants etc.) who were all responsible for her care.

    After gathering information from the medical team and her relatives, as a doctor, I would do anything which lies in the best interest of the patient. The patient has not got the capacity to make a decision for herself, and I would be inclined to assess her prognosis and hence- her quality of life if she did improve. If there is no hope for the patient, and there is no chance for her state to improve, I would remove her feeding tube. The notion of forcing the husband to take care of his wife after six years of her condition deteriorating is ludicrous, and I would therefore support his decision. I would try and let her die peacefully. As sad as this may sound, the prospect of her dying beside her husband, with dignity, is an achievement, and I'd follow up with the gentleman for further psychological support if needed.
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    (Original post by akpad)
    I have a friend who went on the course last year and ended up getting an offer from St George's! She really recommended the course
    Correlation does not imply causation remember....


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    (Original post by Pittawithcheese)
    Correlation does not imply causation remember....


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    They say 90% got conditional offers which is whats gnawing at me. I'm thinking along the same lines, If these people who went on the course had an interview (more likely to be more than one if they are going on a course probably) then they probably would have had a high offer rate regardless. hmmm Idk
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    Does any one know how long the gap is between the Offer given and the interview day.
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    (Original post by bushra)
    Does any one know how long the gap is between the Offer given and the interview day.
    Ranges from 24 hours to 6 months. It really depends on the medical school.
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    (Original post by frogs r everywhere)
    Ranges from 24 hours to 6 months. It really depends on the medical school.
    24 hours?!?!?! No way, i might as well start my preparation now :'(
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    (Original post by bushra)
    24 hours?!?!?! No way, i might as well start my preparation now :'(
    I'm sure he meant 24 hours between the interview and when they give you an offer later on, not 24 hours between the invitation for interview and the interview, no need to panic
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    (Original post by Mehhhh)
    I'm sure he meant 24 hours between the interview and when they give you an offer later on, not 24 hours between the invitation for interview and the interview, no need to panic


    (Original post by bushra)
    24 hours?!?!?! No way, i might as well start my preparation now :'(
    Apologies. Yes, I did mean the gap between the offer and the interview. UCL are famous for their fast responses post-interview.
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    (Original post by Joannywhite)
    Question:

    "A man has been responsible for taking care of his wife who is in a vegetative state for 6 years after a car accident. She can breathe on her own but that is the extent of her abilities. He requests that her feeding tube be removed. What should you, as her physician do? Why?"
    I agree with what frogs everywhere said.

    However, isn't this non- voluntary passive euthanasia? Is it legal? I think it is as the patient will end up in palliative care ?

    Edit: it is

    Also if the husband has power of attorney, then he is able to make the majority of healthcare decisions on behalf of his wife, if not, then the whole medical team and husband have to find common ground.
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    (Original post by prafto)
    You know if we're talking about work experience in an interview, and we use examples, should we avoid examples we already mentioned in our PS, or could we use that example and elaborate more on it?
    Eg/ if they ask us to describe a memorable patient/case we encountered or something along those lines. Or if they asked 'tell me what you learned in work exp'.
    :bump: :bump:
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    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/10...n-murders.html
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    (Original post by 06npate)
    Lool and I'd have blank face when talking about medical history
    Can we go through a few pointers ?
    Well they won't ask you complicated questions on medical history.

    Probably something along the lines of, "What do you think was the greatest advancement in medicine in the 20th century and why? etc..

    And then the answer to that can be anything from the discovery of penicillin, corticosteroids, IVF, RCTs , chlorpromazine in treatment of schizophrenia, and the list goes on....
 
 
 
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