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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    See it a bit different. If this has something to do with a handicap like autism, it is not an excuse in my opinion. And as far as I know autism like Asperger is a medically proven 'disease'...
    Yeah I know. If it's medically proven that one's slow or takes longer to think, fine! But just excuses that one writes slower or takes longer to think than others in the class with no medical reason/proof shouldn't be allowed. :P
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    But next to no one is going to hire someone who tells them that at interview.
    Not necessarily. If they excel at everything else, and have the grades and relevant experience to match, they may have developed coping mechanisms to help them with remembering things or may just require a little more time. They'll therefore stand out in comparison to someone with an average memory and a lack of experience/ideal grades.

    And a job spec will tend to say things like "input orders into such and such database/system" which sounds easy enough but unless you've used it before you're going to have to learn a whole new system, probably several.
    You can talk more explicitly about specific job roles at the interview process.
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    (Original post by HazMusicPanda)
    Yeah I know. If it's medically proven that one's slow or takes longer to think, fine! But just excuses that one writes slower or takes longer to think than others in the class with no medical reason/proof shouldn't be allowed. :P
    Same here. Those people know the time limit and thus know the framework conditions. Those people who have no medically proven handicaps/diseases are able to adapt themselves to those situations, by past papers for instance.
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    At school to get extra time you need to take some sort of test and a lot of slow people ended up not being allowed extra time
    - My autistic friend is ridiculously slow - and from what I see in class, he does need it - but he's only allowed rest breaks.
    Some people should be given rest breaks rather than extra time
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Not necessarily. If they excel at everything else, and have the grades and relevant experience to match, they may have developed coping mechanisms to help them with remembering things or may just require a little more time. They'll therefore stand out in comparison to someone with an average memory and a lack of experience/ideal grades.



    You can talk more explicitly about specific job roles at the interview process.
    But then you're not going to mention it in an interview, that would be a very dangerous thing to do.

    Even if you talk about what your role involves with the employer, you still don't know what you're using systems and processes wise until you use it. For example, Bloomberg; you can't have that explained to you and know how to use it before you've used it and learnt it yourself. It has over 30,000 functions. Or excel, another example where people think they know how to use it but are often required to really improve their knowledge of it once in the job in many financial services roles anyway. This is why probation exists. To see just how you'll cope.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    No we don't agree, but I'm tired of discussing this with you so we'll just leave it
    Hahaha that's a good one
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    (Original post by richpanda)
    why do you need it?
    Why? You don't think ADHD, autism and anxiety are enough to be able to have extra time in exams?
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    But then you're not going to mention it in an interview, that would be a very dangerous thing to do.
    No it's not. It is your duty to make the employer aware if you know you'll struggle or need extra help in an important aspect of your job. If you don't tell them, they won't think anything is wrong and you'll be penalised for consistently being too slow, so you'll probably lose your job anyway.

    Even if you talk about what your role involves with the employer, you still don't know what you're using systems and processes wise until you use it. For example, Bloomberg; you can't have that explained to you and know how to use it before you've used it and learnt it yourself. It has over 30,000 functions. Or excel, another example where people think they know how to use it but are often required to really improve their knowledge of it once in the job in many financial services roles anyway. This is why probation exists. To see just how you'll cope.
    Right so during the probation period, you'll know if you can cope? If you can, you continue. If you can't, you leave and find something else.
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    (Original post by xylas)
    Hahaha that's a good one
    Ok
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    See it a bit different. If this has something to do with a handicap like autism, it is not an excuse in my opinion. And as far as I know autism like Asperger is a medically proven 'disease'...
    Not talking about people with serious disabilities here, but I wonder what the difference is between two people of the same intellect, one of which writes slowly and one of which has been labelled with a learning difficulty because it has been observed that they write slowly? Both have brains that have been wired in a way that gives them equal intelligence yet slower writing speeds, but one of them is given extra time because they are deemed as having a recognised condition. Maybe the one with the recognised condition was labelled so because they displayed related traits such as difficulty with spatial awareness and difficulty in distinguishing left from right. But these problems aren't going to come into play in exams most likely, so you essentially have 2 people who are slow writers yet one of them gets 25% extra time because they possess other difficulties that affect not their exam marks?
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Ok
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    No it's not. It is your duty to make the employer aware if you know you'll struggle or need extra help in an important aspect of your job. If you don't tell them, they won't think anything is wrong and you'll be penalised for consistently being too slow, so you'll probably lose your job anyway.



    Right so during the probation period, you'll know if you can cope? If you can, you continue. If you can't, you leave and find something else.
    It's not your duty, and in the real world people do not do that. Hopefully you'd be deterred by a job spec that suggested you weren't suitable because of these things, but my point is that kids who've been awarded high grades because they've been assisted with extra time may believe they are capable of jobs that they just aren't capable of. It's actually not al that fair on the kid.

    A failed probationary period has serious consequences whether you decide to leave or whether you are asked to by your employer. It's not some sort of test drive. It's on your CV forever.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    It's not your duty, and in the real world people do not do that. Hopefully you'd be deterred by a job spec that suggested you weren't suitable because of these things, but my point is that kids who've been awarded high grades because they've been assisted with extra time may believe they are capable of jobs that they just aren't capable of. It's actually not al that fair on the kid.
    We are talking about the real world and It is your duty. Your employer is not psychic. If they don't make reasonable allowances for you, it's probably because you didn't tell them about your disability.
    How can you make the correlation that extra time = high grades? Because that's not usually the case.

    A failed probationary period has serious consequences whether you decide to leave or whether you are asked to by your employer. It's not some sort of test drive. It's on your CV forever.
    A probationary period is supposed to help you learn the dynamics of your job and whether it is suitable. If you leave because it's unsuitable for you due to a disability that your employer was aware of, it will not count negatively towards you.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    We are talking about the real world and It is your duty. Your employer is not psychic. If they don't make reasonable allowances for you, it's probably because you didn't tell them about your disability.
    How can you make the correlation that extra time = high grades? Because that's not usually the case.


    A probationary period is supposed to help you learn the dynamics of your job and whether it is suitable. If you leave because it's unsuitable for you due to a disability that your employer was aware of, it will not count negatively towards you.
    But that's just not how it works in the hiring process. It is not a 'duty'. You have the legal responsibility to inform your potential employer of any unspent convictions and you must report the dates of your employment history correctly, but there is no duty to explain that you have a slow processing speed. Just as well because you'll unlikely get a decent job after admitting to being a slow thinker, for whatever reason.

    A failed probationary period and a stint of only 3/6 months on your CV is not going to look good. And as unfair as some may think this; if you went to a potential employer and told them that you left your last job after 3 months because you were not suited to it because you were a slow thinker, you would be really sabotaging your career chances. Regardless of your reasons, it's a red flag who you don't meet probation in the eyes of most employers. And this is why it doesn't happen in the real world.
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    In so many ways, no.
    I go to a private school and honestly half the people in my year (11) half extra time.
    not many of these people even have dyslexia or an issue with processing, the school just gave them it and I honestly dont know how they are getting away with it. I have asked many people and their reply is 'because im dumb they gave it to me' which makes no sense as it doesnt improve your knowledge by having it.
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    One girl in my year gets all A stars and nothing else, yet she has extra time and doesnt even use it half the time!!!!
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    i used a laptop in my exams and was given extra time but never needed to use it
    so i'd say the laptop was a massive help the extra time not really
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    But that's just not how it works in the hiring process. It is not a 'duty'. You have the legal responsibility to inform your potential employer of any unspent convictions and you must report the dates of your employment history correctly, but there is no duty to explain that you have a slow processing speed. Just as well because you'll unlikely get a decent job after admitting to being a slow thinker, for whatever reason.
    There's a responsibility to explain that you have a condition that will affect your work. If you feel that it's not relevant, then of course you don't have to tell them if you don't want to, but if you know it will directly impact upon your work, you have a responsibility to tell them so that they can make adjustments for you. It would be illegal for them to turn their nose at you if you feel that you can still fulfill your job description. It's not just about 'slow processing speed' it's about having a condition that means you have a slow processing speed. There's a difference.

    A failed probationary period and a stint of only 3/6 months on your CV is not going to look good. And as unfair as some may think this; if you went to a potential employer and told them that you left your last job after 3 months because you were not suited to it because you were a slow thinker, you would be really sabotaging your career chances. Regardless of your reasons, it's a red flag who you don't meet probation in the eyes of most employers. And this is why it doesn't happen in the real world.
    It's not about being a slow thinker. It's about having a disability. its not a red flag because by law, it would be discriminatory for an employer to reject you solely on that basis.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    There's a responsibility to explain that you have a condition that will affect your work. If you feel that it's not relevant, then of course you don't have to tell them if you don't want to, but if you know it will directly impact upon your work, you have a responsibility to tell them so that they can make adjustments for you. It would be illegal for them to turn their nose at you if you feel that you can still fulfill your job description. It's not just about 'slow processing speed' it's about having a condition that means you have a slow processing speed. There's a difference.



    It's not about being a slow thinker. It's about having a disability. its not a red flag because by law, it would be discriminatory for an employer to reject you solely on that basis.
    But you would be, quite categorically and measurably a slow thinker regardless of cause.

    Yes if you had a severe impairment then you'd need to talk to your prospective employer, but most people are not severe and have no obligation to mention it. If they did, an employer could argue that they required someone who could process information quickly to make fast decisions, for example, and that the person with a slow processing speed, whilst not their fault, is not suited to the job. In the same way that a double amputee could not be a manual labourer. It's not discrimination, they just can't do the job.

    I'm sorry but out there in the real world you don't have the benefit of all these exceptions being made for you, and often you are not treated in a particularly compliant way because you do not have the power to challenge an employer without negatively affecting your own prospects.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    Not talking about people with serious disabilities here, but I wonder what the difference is between two people of the same intellect, one of which writes slowly and one of which has been labelled with a learning difficulty because it has been observed that they write slowly? Both have brains that have been wired in a way that gives them equal intelligence yet slower writing speeds, but one of them is given extra time because they are deemed as having a recognised condition. Maybe the one with the recognised condition was labelled so because they displayed related traits such as difficulty with spatial awareness and difficulty in distinguishing left from right. But these problems aren't going to come into play in exams most likely, so you essentially have 2 people who are slow writers yet one of them gets 25% extra time because they possess other difficulties that affect not their exam marks?
    Yeah, fair enough. From this point of view it can be considered as a handicap in the future. Lack of spatial awareness might be very likely, distinguishing from left to right rather unlikely. I guess there are more handicaps than known at the moment. Either way, it depends on how this slower writing speed can be reasoned as a disease or handicap in general.
 
 
 
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