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    they have no ambition, there just happy earning 20k a year because they enjoy their job
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    (Original post by theBranicAc)
    they have no ambition, there just happy earning 20k a year because they enjoy their job
    Generalising is fun huh

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Generalising is fun huh

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    yep because its true
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    (Original post by theBranicAc)
    they have no ambition, there just happy earning 20k a year because they enjoy their job
    Tell that to Taylor Swift. Raking in the cash right now.
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    Tell that to Taylor Swift. Raking in the cash right now.
    obviously not celebritys, rich or famous people,
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    Probably intimidated by the wage gaps
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    Tell that to Taylor Swift. Raking in the cash right now.
    Can hardly use her as an example now can you. Most people, much less women, are not raking in anything.
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    (Original post by theBranicAc)
    yep because its true
    I'd normally be inclined to agree that feminism in this country and side of the globe is ******** since otherwise fortunate women can only complain about nothing except wage gaps, while the difference between their salary and another man's (supposedly) is more than what a woman gets paid in several other countries!?

    But that doesn't mean life isn't generally harder for them. My pity stops there.
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    Not all girls go for poorly paid degrees, everyone goes into a career that they are passionate about, and sometimes it comes back to being a poorly paid degree unfortunately.
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    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    Well, university lecturing will always have a higher threshold of entry than teaching for two reasons. Firstly, there's the obvious fact that university lecturers are teaching far harder work than school teachers, so they quite simply have to be more intelligent. Secondly, university lecturers have to be do research. Especially in science subjects, you're pushing the boundary of knowledge. It is obviously more demanding.

    Teaching is a piss-take, and it's half the reason why education standards are so low in Britain.

    Again, for whatever reasons - there's growing evidence that it's rooted in biology, but it's still too early to say for sure - the jobs women tend to dominate tend to be 'easier', in the sense that more people are capable of doing them.

    The view people have about psychology is less about the actual degree or the fact that women dominate it though. It's viewed a little scathingly because pretty much every uni offers it, and comparitively few graduates actually use their degrees. Psychology is an incredibly good degree if you're doing it to go on and work further in the field of psychology. But the overwhelming majority of psychology students are doing it because they couldn't think of anything else to do; that's what damages the reputation of the degree. In countries where there are far fewer psychology graduates, a psychology degree typically leads to a psychology job, which makes the degree more reputable.
    I appreciate the bouncing of ideas.

    Agreed about the job being more academically strenuous - but I do feel that there should be higher requirements for teaching (akin to that of being a lecturer) - as teaching is, in real terms, such an incredibly important job. My teachers only really knew of their subjects (most of them anyway), really should know a lot more about how children function.

    I think I get your point about biology - in that males tend to perform better as visual-spatial tasks and females tend to have better social skills (in adulthood, if I recall correctly - differences but not considerable differences, but significant. Note also that it appears to be societal expectations driving these biological changes rather than it being genetic, as far as I'm aware). So my supposition may be confounded by this.

    But then that would, I guess, pose the question of why we (as society(s)) expect women to display features which are less favorable than those which are (expected to be) developed by males. ^^
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    I appreciate the bouncing of ideas.

    Agreed about the job being more academically strenuous - but I do feel that there should be higher requirements for teaching (akin to that of being a lecturer) - as teaching is, in real terms, such an incredibly important job. My teachers only really knew of their subjects (most of them anyway), really should know a lot more about how children function.

    I think I get your point about biology - in that males tend to perform better as visual-spatial tasks and females tend to have better social skills (in adulthood, if I recall correctly - differences but not considerable differences, but significant. Note also that it appears to be societal expectations driving these biological changes rather than it being genetic, as far as I'm aware). So my supposition may be confounded by this.

    But then that would, I guess, pose the question of why we (as society(s)) expect women to display features which are less favorable than those which are (expected to be) developed by males. ^^
    Couldn't agree more. I'd only add that in my experience, you couldn't even count on the teachers knowing their subjects!

    It actually goes beyond that, it seems. There is a growing weight of evidence to suggest that the different predispositions of men and women are affected to some extent by our genetic differences. Interestingly, men and women appear to show the greatest divergence in their career choices in those countries which have the most gender equality; it's the countries where women lack equality that we see the greatest proportion of them entering STEM fields, for instance. This would rather suggest that when social and economic pressures are at a minimum, and men and women are most able to make their own personal decisions, they generally make different choices. This is fairly compelling evidence to a more fundamental genetic influence.

    Like I said, the jury is still very much out on this; the studies are fairly cutting edge and the pressure from feminist lobbyists on scientists to not find any genetic differences is a real stumbling block - if you want to see evidence of this, there's a really interesting documentary that was conducted in Norway (I think) on the matter.
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    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    Couldn't agree more. I'd only add that in my experience, you couldn't even count on the teachers knowing their subjects!

    It actually goes beyond that, it seems. There is a growing weight of evidence to suggest that the different predispositions of men and women are affected to some extent by our genetic differences. Interestingly, men and women appear to show the greatest divergence in their career choices in those countries which have the most gender equality; it's the countries where women lack equality that we see the greatest proportion of them entering STEM fields, for instance. This would rather suggest that when social and economic pressures are at a minimum, and men and women are most able to make their own personal decisions, they generally make different choices. This is fairly compelling evidence to a more fundamental genetic influence.

    Like I said, the jury is still very much out on this; the studies are fairly cutting edge and the pressure from feminist lobbyists on scientists to not find any genetic differences is a real stumbling block - if you want to see evidence of this, there's a really interesting documentary that was conducted in Norway (I think) on the matter.
    Really interesting discussion cheers.
    Surprised that there are still big (or bigger) differences in countries with the most gender equality! I didn't know that.
    I'll have to check the documentary out (when finished this lovely dissertation - fun stuff!)
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    (Original post by FredOrJohn)
    Google says average starting salary of engineer is £23.5K
    Google says average starting salary of a teacher is £22.2K
    Its not that a big difference.
    Teachers have a high starting salary (presumably to lure in young graduates) but very limited progression.
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    (Original post by RamocitoMorales)
    Teachers have a high starting salary (presumably to lure in young graduates) but very limited progression.

    Define 'high'.

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    I dunno, lots of girls I know including myself are going for very well paid degrees....(biomedicine, pharmacology and law)
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    (Original post by Foregodecay)
    I dunno, lots of girls I know including myself are going for very well paid degrees....(biomedicine, pharmacology and law)
    Degrees don't pay salaries btw, jobs do

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    I'd rather do something I vaguely enjoy - I did a girly subject and in my job could probably reach £30k in a few years - not too bad, I don't particularly want more than that.*
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    (Original post by theBranicAc)
    obviously not celebritys, rich or famous people,
    :cookie:
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Define 'high'.

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    Relatively high with respect to starting salaries of other careers.
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    (Original post by neal95)
    Well from the girls I know who have done poor degrees, they either want to be a kept woman so to speak, were the husband is the main breadwinner and they make use of the joint account, or, particularly in the case of ethnic minority women such as Muslims etc then they expect to be in the homestead anyway and so just do a degree to part etc for 3 years. This is just from my experiences and Dosent apply to all women so mods don't send me a card and sjw's please don't lambast me lol.
    When I read posts like these about Muslim women I always think 'which Muslims are these?' - there's nothing inherent in our religion stopping us from working. I come from a household where every person works 8-12 hour shifts for the NHS - no one is expected to stay at the homestead.

    I think this is a case of backwards culture and being uneducated leading to people being forced/choosing to just look after the home regardless of their capabilities.
 
 
 
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