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    Same, I'm a bit heartbroken. I don't want to live in a country full of hatred and racism. I don't want to live in a country where I can't get a job despite going to university and working hard for my degree. I don't want to live in a country where I can't freely travel Europe and experience new cultures, meet new friends, make job connections and have the possibility of working abroad without visas and hassle. I don't want to live in a country where agriculture receives no funding and the industry finally dies (my family are mosty from a farming background, I can't bear to see them potentially go bankrupt or have to sell everything they own and have worked for since the age of 16 and younger).


    Why on earth did this happen. Oh yes, because Farage. I hope he goes to hell.
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    (Original post by Jjj90)
    I feel really genuinely upset about it, it is a plunge into the dark, it goes in the face of so much of what I believe in - I think it is a vote founded in xenophobia, it probably wouldn't have happened if not for the plight of Syrian refugees and the fear that working class people have of brown-skinned foreigners, which is an appalling indictment of out country. It is a huge risk financially and whilst I am not averse to risk the fact that there is no clear benefit to leaving the EU makes me feel sick. I think that the fact that 16 and 17 year old's were not allowed to vote whilst sagging wrinkled grannies knocking on heavens door can vote is a disgrace (talk about undemocratic) and if the news is anything to go by most 60+ voters were voting leave for reasons that a particularly stupid toddler could pick holes in. Scotland are going to leave the UK (and lets not pretend this won't happen, it will), something which barely seemed to get a mention in the TV debates, presumably to avoid the pathetic petulant accusation of "scare mongering".

    I really do think this is a terrible moment for Britain. It may pay off, but probably won't - and even now I can't quite grasp what the leave vote is fundamentally for, beyond the sweeping, skin deep catchphrases like 'because immigration!' or 'to get our country back!'...

    It is a sad time, in which the most ignorant parts of society have managed to shove the rest of us around. It really is sad.


    I hesitated before replying as I might be thought to be trolling but I just couldn't help pointing out that it's precisely because the most ignorant parts of our society-I totally agree with that by the way,many leavers really are morons-that I celebrate the result.


    We have a political system that so much favours people who are fortunate enough to be intelligent and who will inherit property and/or be able to buy a house that frankly it makes me wanna puke.


    This was a once in a lifetime opportunity for the uneducated masses of this (overrated )country to stick two fingers up at the oh so precious,ungrateful,privileged,m iddle classes.

    Thank Christ they siezed the day.

    And to hell with the consequences.Especially as they wont be that bad ffs.
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    (Original post by Jjj90)
    I feel really genuinely upset about it, it is a plunge into the dark, it goes in the face of so much of what I believe in - I think it is a vote founded in xenophobia, it probably wouldn't have happened if not for the plight of Syrian refugees and the fear that working class people have of brown-skinned foreigners, which is an appalling indictment of out country. It is a huge risk financially and whilst I am not averse to risk the fact that there is no clear benefit to leaving the EU makes me feel sick. I think that the fact that 16 and 17 year old's were not allowed to vote whilst sagging wrinkled grannies knocking on heavens door can vote is a disgrace (talk about undemocratic) and if the news is anything to go by most 60+ voters were voting leave for reasons that a particularly stupid toddler could pick holes in. Scotland are going to leave the UK (and lets not pretend this won't happen, it will), something which barely seemed to get a mention in the TV debates, presumably to avoid the pathetic petulant accusation of "scare mongering".

    I really do think this is a terrible moment for Britain. It may pay off, but probably won't - and even now I can't quite grasp what the leave vote is fundamentally for, beyond the sweeping, skin deep catchphrases like 'because immigration!' or 'to get our country back!'...

    It is a sad time, in which the most ignorant parts of society have managed to shove the rest of us around. It really is sad.
    This. Northern Ireland might also leave, too. Obviously that is a whole new issue in its own (can Ireland afford NI? do they want NI? how much can Sinn Fein sell this to economic unionists? what will the main unionist parties say/do? will there be renewed violence if a border poll happens or does not happen?), but for the first time ever, it's the most likely it's ever been to happening. I've always been a purely economic unionist, but if we leave the EU, I want a United Ireland. We need EU funding for the economy in Northern Ireland to grow after all the years of fighting. We were just starting to get our feet off the ground, properly. Game of Thrones has brought in a lot more creative work. People are investing in Belfast for their companies. We have more employment than before. Now all of that seems to have been flushed down the toilet.

    I'll be getting an Irish passport this month because I'm not dealing with the potential hassle of not having a European passport, but I feel for everyone in Scotland, England and Wales as this isn't an option for you. I'm lucky that being born in NI means I have the possibility of attaining dual Irish and British citizenship. But it doesn't help my economic situation at home, now. It's dire.

    The poorest voted and many voted to leave. Somehow, I can't see the fat cats in Westminster spending much of their budget on regeneration of the poorest areas of the United Kingdom. At least with EU funding, it had to go on those areas. Who knows what will happen now.

    This is such a mess.
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    http://imgur.com/a/sicaP

    Seems the Brexit vote has emboldened the scum to come out from their caves. I feel like we're living in 1930s Germany.
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    75 % of the MPs want the UK to remain in the EU.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016...ucated-old-an/
    Many people claim it is allabout democracy. Well, "The most significant benefit of representativedemocracy is the fact that it is the finest system devised that enables thehighest number of people inside the population to make participation withintheir government. One major argument against the use of referendum is that it weakens representative democracy byundermining the role and importance of elected representatives."

    The oldest democracies in the world Italy and Greece are in the EU.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    It's 27 countries that are incapable of agreeing on anything before months of negotiations. Look at the time they took on the Migrants Crisis, the Greek Debt Crisis, the Ukraine Crisis. The UK will not face a united front.
    The Spanish real estate sector was almost annihilated in 2008, but has since coyly recovered thanks to British pensioners who buy houses there. If the EU puts restrictions on British immigrants or investments, Spanish real estate will go down again. As Spain is still without a government (there are elections tomorrow), it will be a disaster (hence why Spanish markets have plunged on Friday).
    Btw, the Communists are set to win tomorrow, so the disaster may happen anyway (and the UK will suddenly not look that bad).
    Many, if not most, British industries have already left the UK. This is why people voted Leave in the North and Wales.
    The migrant crisis and greek debt crisis were not clear cut, they were very difficult issues on which there was a significant amount of internal disagreement (unlike this one, I think it's fairly clear what to do with the UK). Frankly I think it was impressive that they were able to agree things so quickly, and so generously given that countries like the UK refused to participate so the whole thing was shared out unequally. They got 28 member states with very divergent opinions to come up with a plan of action about a serious humanitarian crisis, and put it into action.

    The UK itself can't even agree things in spans of years let alone months. We can't even decide where to put a runway. You can't sit on a high horse about 'how long' it took them, they made a decision and they acted on it. The UK wasn't part of that at all because we can't make big decisions, our government is always just pooing its pants about whether it'll get people to vote for them at the next election, so we spend most of each election cycle in a state of utter uselessness in order to protect the political backsides at the top. The EU wasn't like that and I think it's pretty hypocritical to act like that's the case - actually it had the power to make big decisions that as individual countries we could never make, because we'd be spending our lives bickering about it, but it could bring together diverse people and views from across the EU for the good of everyone. That's part of why I was (and still am) proud to be a European Citizen.

    If you think English pensioners in Spain are genuinely *holding up the Spanish economy*, I despair.

    We have a lot of industries here in the UK. Not just 'British' ones but international ones that pay their taxes here and employ people here. The idea that some of them have gone abroad therefore we can afford to ruin all of the rest of them can go right up there with the "British oldies save Spanish economy" statement. If we wish to make the entire country like Northern England and Wales as regards destroying all our other industries alongside the old ones (which realistically speaking, were unsustainable in the modern world), so that we have nothing left, we're all morons. I sincerely refuse to believe that was anybody's motive for voting. Besides which, I live in the North and it is hardly some kind of post-industrial wasteland, there's a lot of wealth up here too and a lot of industry still, more so than where I originally come from in the East of England, so I'd ditch your stereotypes. The North is a diverse place with a lot to offer.
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    (Original post by The_Internet)
    The pound crashing, and the dissolution of our own union? Thanks to the leave guise for sorting that for us..
    Notice the similarity:

    This is too true
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    I'm concerned about my job. I don't want to lose it

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    If I may, this is NOT a first world problem. The European Union was founded to stop bloodshed in this continent, which had spilled into World War, more than once. But I'm guessing you probably dropped History before you took your GSCEs.
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    (Original post by chris888)
    The oldest democracies in the world Italy and Greece are in the EU.
    Greece is a democracy since 1974. Italy since 1945.
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    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    Okay, stupid question, of course you do.


    I've felt so down all day because of this, and just have this constant sick feeling in my stomach. I genuinely feel like I'm grieving.

    I feel like I'm grieving for our growing economy (slow but steady).

    I'm grieving for our loss of cultural enrichment. If we weren't a part of the EU I'd never have met people from the likes France, Norway, Germany, who have so much to offer to our country. We have so much to gain from these cultures.

    I'm grieving for us no longer being a leading institution for academia. The vast majority of my lecturers were European researchers- Germans, Dutch, Portuguese, Swiss, Italian. Without these people, the research department at my university would be nothing. UK is no longer going to be at the forefront of science.

    I just feel so ashamed for us as a country. For making such a strong gesture of unwelcome to EU migrants. My sister's boss is Portuguese, and she could see the sheer hurt in her, with her boss expressing that she now feels unwelcome in the place she calls home. This is mirrored by so many EU immigrants across the UK. My university professor tweeted-

    "I am an EU migrant trying to make a contribution to your country. It is because of people like me you voted Leave. Yes, it hurts."

    I just feel so disgusted and sickened that we chose to make these people unwelcome. These who have such much to contribute to us.

    I feel genuinely depressed about this. Can anyone who voted Stay shine a light on this for me please. And anyone who voted Leave, **** off, you should be made to pick up the pieces.

    I'm more pissed off than depressed tbh
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    (Original post by Alexion)
    "get over it"

    Our country's sustained a major wound and you're making it sound like we lost a card game. OK.
    Sustained a major wound? How so?

    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    I expect we may well keep free movement anyway. It will be difficult to negotiate a deal which does not allow this while maintaining decent trade links, so there will probably be compromise. Even if not, skilled workers like professors simply would not be the target of restrictions on immigration. There will not suddenly be a mass shortage of professors. We won't be shut off from Europe simply because we are not in the EU. Norway and Switzerland are no less European for being out of the EU.

    If they feel unwelcome, I am sorry but that is something they have to deal with. Until they are explicitly made unwelcome, this is just their perception of the result. We opted out of a political and economic union, we did not tick a box "get rid of EU migrants". It is utter nonsense and generalisation to insinuate that the majority of leave voters voted leave because of EU migrants with skilled jobs. Personally, for instance, I am barely even concerned about limiting immigration relatively speaking, let alone limiting the immigration of those who obviously contribute to the economy and to society like your professors. It is not all black and white, the world is not going to end and we are not shutting ourselves off from Europe.
    We have a lot of leverage and bargaining power.

    (Original post by 16characterlimit)
    I was starting to think, "ah its alright, just a little of economic struggles"

    Then I realised what an excellent unique deal we had, I also realised how this vote was decided by baby boomers, who have lived their lives with free education, little debt and cheap housing, and in a final act of selfishness, in their dying breaths took a permanent decision we were unhappy with.

    I also thought about how we might have brought the beginning of the end of a true force for good, the final destiny of Europe, after such a rich history, all thrown away for fear of our own brothers and sisters, many by people who has never met such people.

    So yeah, I'm quite depressed.

    I don't usually like Vox, since its quite reactionary and likes to talk about identity politics mainly, but this really hit the nail on the head for me: http://www.vox.com/2016/6/24/1202595...-voters-remain
    Oh ffs get off your pedestal and be rid of your sense of entitlement. They had every right to vote to leave in the EU referendum, you unprincipled, opportunistic idiot.

    You think that all had done it in an act of selfishness (read: spite)? People don't work like that.
    People in their dying breaths are in their 80s and 90s.
    What about all those 50 and 60 year olds who have another 30 years to live? Would you gladly revoke their right to vote just to get your way? What about when you get older, do you just give back the vote so you can, or do you start discriminating in another way, like by class? Yes, you would, as ostensible and evident by your post.

    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    It's absolutely horrible, it doesn't even feel real. I feel unwelcome in my own country.
    I think you need to grow up; you're acting like a petulant child.

    Why would you possibly feel unwelcome just because of the EU referendum result? Not all voted on the grounds of immigration, and that isn't inherently xenophobic. They might have voted out to help save the steel industry in Port Tablot or Teaside, perhaps they wanted lower energy prices, considering the power sector are not entitled to any free allowances in the EU emissions trading scheme; all have to be bought at an auction or bought as leftovers of other companies. Perhaps they wanted a reform of the EU lesser duty rule, which prevented certain taxes from being raised higher. (Though Sajid Javid/David Cameron's government objected to a proposal to reform said rule.)

    Perhaps they wanted a reform of phase 4 in the Emissions Trading Scheme, which even on the UK government's own website was said to cause concerns. This creates uncertainty --> extra large industrial users of electricity relocate.

    Perhaps they wanted a simplified regulatory framework, or they wanted a dynamic allocation system for emissions, which they thought was unlikely.

    All of these reasons revolve around one to two points; the steel industry crisis & the power sector (energy prices.) And there are a plethora more about so many other points made in the referendum.

    (Original post by maryamzahid)
    I am disgusted not at the result, but at the kind of people that enforced it. Fear mongering and misinformation, that inevitably swayed many to regret their vote. I am disappointed, but can only force myself and others to remain optimistic and hopeful about our future here.
    Fear mongering was on both sides.

    I recall "ISIS would [probably] want it" David Cameron; no confirmation.
    "Economic meltdown"
    These were passed of as fact, even though at most they can only be forecasts; predictions. This works on the premise that no foul agendas, no agenda but honesty and truth, were at play.

    (Original post by Rhythmical)
    How pathetic, don't come crying to us when your Brexit plan falls through.
    I bet you can't even list or make any arguments.

    You're being just as anti-intellectual as people on both sides of the argument.

    The leave voters who accept the £350 million at face value.
    The remain voters who accept the opinions of experts as "fact" (a biggie.)
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    (Original post by XcitingStuart)
    Sustained a major wound? How so?
    Destroyed our economy, destroyed our relationship with Europe, destroyed our position as a place of international business and investment, unleashed a tide of previously thinly disguised racism, declared ourselves internationally as xenophobes who would rather ruin our own state and everything in it than welcome foreigners, destroyed our rights and benefits as European citizens, destroyed Great Britain itself if the Scottish have the re-referendum they certainly deserve after being screwed in this almighty fashion... I wouldn't jump on a sinking ship either.

    We will of course not be doing anything of the sort about changing emissions or competition or anything like that because we'll have to buy into the free market and follow most of their rules anyway. Or completely lose the right to free movement and genuinely bankrupt ourselves into the deepest recession the country has ever seen by destroying just under 50% of our trade in one fell swoop. So assuming we buy in, we'll be following the rules but no longer have any say in making them. Contrary to popular belief, the UK actually got a lot done to our benefit in the EU and also blocked a lot of things which weren't to our benefit, which will now affect us without us being able to have any say.

    I honestly cannot say that any of the rules we can now ditch are anything more than trivial compared to what we have just done to ourselves in damage. People got so fixated on the relatively few rules the EU did impose that we disagreed with that they lost sight of the bigger picture.

    This nation is coming across to the world as legions of small minded bigots who'd rather shoot themselves in the foot, divide their country into separate nations and destroy their futures than have a tolerant society that looked outwards into the world to solve problems, instead of opting out so we can sit in a little dark corner by ourselves, spitting at passers by when they come too close.

    Like we are now literally the opposite of everything the UK has ever been in its history - outward looking, problem solving, negotiating, assuming roles of responsibility, innovating, pioneering and welcoming things from other countries in order to better our own.
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    (Original post by snailsareslimy)
    Same, I'm a bit heartbroken. I don't want to live in a country full of hatred and racism. I don't want to live in a country where I can't get a job despite going to university and working hard for my degree. I don't want to live in a country where I can't freely travel Europe and experience new cultures, meet new friends, make job connections and have the possibility of working abroad without visas and hassle. I don't want to live in a country where agriculture receives no funding and the industry finally dies (my family are mosty from a farming background, I can't bear to see them potentially go bankrupt or have to sell everything they own and have worked for since the age of 16 and younger).


    Why on earth did this happen. Oh yes, because Farage. I hope he goes to hell.
    lol butthurt
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    (Original post by XcitingStuart)
    x
    I've explained myself to you before, I'm not going to repeatedly again mention it. You sound like the leave voters who voted on the premise of immigration.
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    (Original post by Rhythmical)
    I've explained myself to you before, I'm not going to repeatedly again mention it. You sound like the leave voters who voted on the premise of immigration.
    Cry more
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    (Original post by Rhythmical)
    I've explained myself to you before, I'm not going to repeatedly again mention it. You sound like the leave voters who voted on the premise of immigration.
    Ironically I didn't vote on the grounds of any immigration argument.
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    I felt annoyed on Friday but I've slowly accepted that the only people we should be laughing at are the Brexit supporters who believed that leaving the EU would fix everything wrong with the UK
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    (Original post by Cadherin)
    Only 48% of them.
    nah try again
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    (Original post by seaholme)
    Destroyed our economy, destroyed our relationship with Europe, destroyed our position as a place of international business and investment, unleashed a tide of previously thinly disguised racism, declared ourselves internationally as xenophobes who would rather ruin our own state and everything in it than welcome foreigners, destroyed our rights and benefits as European citizens, destroyed Great Britain itself if the Scottish have the re-referendum they certainly deserve after being screwed in this almighty fashion... I wouldn't jump on a sinking ship either.

    We will of course not be doing anything of the sort about changing emissions or competition or anything like that because we'll have to buy into the free market and follow most of their rules anyway. Or completely lose the right to free movement and genuinely bankrupt ourselves into the deepest recession the country has ever seen by destroying just under 50% of our trade in one fell swoop. So assuming we buy in, we'll be following the rules but no longer have any say in making them. Contrary to popular belief, the UK actually got a lot done to our benefit in the EU and also blocked a lot of things which weren't to our benefit, which will now affect us without us being able to have any say.

    I honestly cannot say that any of the rules we can now ditch are anything more than trivial compared to what we have just done to ourselves in damage. People got so fixated on the relatively few rules the EU did impose that we disagreed with that they lost sight of the bigger picture.

    This nation is coming across to the world as legions of small minded bigots who'd rather shoot themselves in the foot, divide their country into separate nations and destroy their futures than have a tolerant society that looked outwards into the world to solve problems, instead of opting out so we can sit in a little dark corner by ourselves, spitting at passers by when they come too close.

    Like we are now literally the opposite of everything the UK has ever been in its history - outward looking, problem solving, negotiating, assuming roles of responsibility, innovating, pioneering and welcoming things from other countries in order to better our own.
    I couldn't have put it any more perfectly. Even setting aside all the major economic and diplomatic benefits, EU membership also provided many 'soft' benefits such as having the freedom to simply live anywhere else in the union, a benefit that, contrary to popular belief, benefits British citizens too. I did have plans to move to the continent later in life, but this has been quashed now as that job no longer exists. I also have a friend who lives in Germany, and visiting will be made more difficult because of this result. Just little aspects of life like this, that affect thousands of people, now face barriers due to our EU exit.


    (Brexiters):

    And regarding the steel industry crisis, the government was already committed to provide funds to rescue the industry if they could find a buyer. Even if this were not the case, it is arguably economically more viable simply to import cheaper steel. Pumping funds into a dying industry is like sustaining someone for a few more weeks on life support; no one wants to let go but in the end it will make little difference. If you think the job losses in this industry were bad, just wait until you see the thousands of workers who are now jobless as a result of Brexit, this includes large numbers of European civil servants, workers in the finance sector, contractors, building companies etc etc
 
 
 
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