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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    It proves that YOU don't need a degree. It doesn't prove a thing for others; such as doctors, nurses, teachers, etc.

    Apprenticeships aren't that viable anyway. They pay minimum wage and are very restricting. Some people don't have the option of doing apprenticeships because of where they live and etc.

    Unfortunately, you need a degree nowadays because the majority are going to uni which makes it incredibly harder to apply for an £18K salary without a degree.
    18k is like £8.65 ph. You can get that by showing up at an agency with a strong Eastern European accent and a good attitude, you don't need a ****ing degree.
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    (Original post by jake4198)
    Hi,

    I know my making this post is going to raise a lot of anger, especially among the new-age mob who say passion and determination are the only factors levying success, but sadly I have seen a lot of posts giving students terrible advice regarding their academic future by telling them a degree in a non-vocational and non-traditional subject will have little impact on their future job prospects. Put simply, it is morally indefensible to advice young people that a degree in some bizarre liberal arts discipline is a good use of their one-off student loan; employers nowadays have an abundance of graduates whom to choose from and being disadvantaged in one aspect of your personal profile because you were fed misinformation by your peers will lead many young graduates fighting it out for low-paid employment.

    Of course there will be people who will tell you how they've become a millionaire with their English degree from London Met, but we also need to have a sense of perspective. Do not go to university if you are not sure what you want to do with the rest of your life. University is expensive. And is £50,000 of student debt a burden you want to carry when you don't even have an end-plan in mind? There are a lot of graduate opportunities available for students who graduate from any university with a 2:1, but if you don't possess much added-experience alongside your academic qualifications, then the subject discipline holds a lot relevance. My Area Manager, who is a young graduate, told me that he was informed during his application process that students with "weak degrees in weak subjects" are ignored during selection. He said the degree that you choose to study at university says a lot about you as a person and the level of work ethic you acquire as well. Spending time in industry and developing proper work experience is a much better and more efficient use of time for those who don't know what they want to do than going to university, as work experience is paramount for employers and the on-the-work pay is an added bonus as well.

    Here's an excellent video I'd advice you all to watch:

    can you just tell me what's classed as a terrible degree. I really can't be bothered reading that
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    (Original post by inhuman)
    You're excused.

    https://www.prospects.ac.uk/postgrad...-into-teaching

    "If your degree subject does not link closely to the subject you intend to teach you may be offered a subject knowledge enhancement course as a part of your application, for some secondary level subject areas."

    You are not here to clarify anything, but defend your preset view.
    You must be deluded if you think that option is as popular of viable as it was say; 15 years ago.

    You should see the amount of aspiring teachers on TSR and TES who complain about being rejected from PGCE courses because they don't have the necessary subject knowledge from their degree.

    I think you don't understand what "may be offered" means. This isn't an alternative pathway sweetie, it hardly takes in effect.

    I've spoken to a lot of PGCE organizers about this very issue. But each to their own sugar. :flutter:
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    You must be deluded if you think that option is as popular of viable as it was say; 15 years ago.

    You should see the amount of aspiring teachers on TSR and TES who complain about being rejected from PGCE courses because they don't have the necessary subject knowledge from their degree.

    I think you don't understand what "may be offered" means. This isn't an alternative pathway sweetie, it hardly takes in effect.

    I've spoken to a lot of PGCE organizers about this very issue. But each to their own sugar. :flutter:
    Lol'd.

    I know several people who did this. But then again they were clever people.
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    (Original post by SmashConcept)
    18k is like £8.65 ph. You can get that by showing up at an agency with a strong Eastern European accent and a good attitude, you don't need a ****ing degree.
    you can get that at mac Donald's to be honest. if your over 25 and a crew trainer on overnights but that's the extreme end of it.

    i don't think every degree if useless (yes there are some that make no sense) just that there are a lot of people going to do them but don't really think about after the degree and get lost in the here and now and not getting the most out of it.
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    I followed my passion, going into a good university for engineering on a scholarship.
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    (Original post by 1secondsofvamps)
    I'm in year 12, going into year 13 in September. You?
    Year 11 about to start year 12
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Why do you care what other people are doing so much? If they want to spend thousands on doing the course that they want to do, let them get on with it - it's their life and they're feeding the economy.
    Obvs, I agree with letting people do what they want for intrinsic reasons. But how do they 'feed' the economy?
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    History and English (especially at RG unis) are two competitive courses to get into and are respected by employers. 70% of graduate jobs don't require or prefer a specific degree- there are plenty of history and English grads in top jobs like law, accounting, research, banking, politics etc...
    I hate that word.
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    (Original post by AppleB)

    Teachers apparently have the highest salary after graduating

    They dont, their salaries are unfair imo
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    (Original post by SugarCoatedCart)
    They dont, their salaries are unfair imo
    Hhhmmmmm
    Majority of teachers I have spoken to say they cope fine with their salary.
    Idk
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Obvs, I agree with letting people do what they want for intrinsic reasons. But how do they 'feed' the economy?
    If you know anything about how economic growth works, you should know this already mate. If not and you want the answers, I suggest a bit of research, far be it from me to sit and write out how the economy works. Short answer - public spending feeds the economy. There's obviously more to it than that, but that's the short answer.
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    Lol Did marketing and business management now work for Google. I have also worked for the NHS,Shell and HSBC.
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    (Original post by Tsrsarahhhh)
    Lol I feel like I'm studying one of these 'useless' degrees as I'm going to start studying linguistics this year. Tbh no degree is useless just bc it doesn't lead straight to a job. Many people just apply to degrees like medicine and engineering bc they pay well and end up realising they have no passion for the subject. There are many degrees that people take as kind of a base, after they finish they may be clearer about what their interests are and they can build from there. I'm taking linguistics for example and I have a slight idea of what I want to do. I'm quite interested in speech therapy but I don't want to commit to the 4 year degree bc it might not be something I want to do. By doing a linguistics degree I can figure out what my exact interests are, take on some work experience in the field and If I enjoy it become one by taking a MSc or if I don't enjoy it do something else.
    Dude (or dudette) don't let this thread make you think Linguistics is useless. I graduated in Linguistics 3 years ago and got a job that started at 24k when I left and that was back then. Sure it's not as much as these doctors and engineers and what have you but being a Community Manager was fun and the company was relaxed with frequent desk beer days. Linguistics is not more useless but you need to be smart. Don't piss about during your holidays, get work experience. Join societies and do extracurricular activities, join leadership schemes do volunteer work. If you want to do speech therapy realise the postgraduate course is competitive and try and get relevant shadowing or volunteer work.

    This thread does make some good points, degrees that are more in demand will provide an easier ride but this shouldn't be taken as gospel. Computer Science graduates will struggle if all they have is their degree and nothing else so it's not a problem unique to non-stem.
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    (Original post by 99_Problems)
    Dude (or dudette) don't let this thread make you think Linguistics is useless. I graduated in Linguistics 3 years ago and got a job that started at 24k when I left and that was back then. Sure it's not as much as these doctors and engineers and what have you but being a Community Manager was fun and the company was relaxed with frequent desk beer days. Linguistics is not more useless but you need to be smart. Don't piss about during your holidays, get work experience. Join societies and do extracurricular activities, join leadership schemes do volunteer work. If you want to do speech therapy realise the postgraduate course is competitive and try and get relevant shadowing or volunteer work.

    This thread does make some good points, degrees that are more in demand will provide an easier ride but this shouldn't be taken as gospel. Computer Science graduates will struggle if all they have is their degree and nothing else so it's not a problem unique to non-stem.
    Thanks for the words of encouragement . Recently I've been thinking about life after my degree and it's hard to keep a positive outlook on it when people are constantly telling you that you should do a more vocational degree. What are you doing now??
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Obvs, I agree with letting people do what they want for intrinsic reasons. But how do they 'feed' the economy?
    Some of us older people have fed the economy, and university wasn't possible when I was the age of many of you here. My degree won't lead to employment - I was offered a place at Reading to study Law in '98-99, but family logistics made it impossible, so went local for Criminology.
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    (Original post by TercioOfParma)
    Can you not take the banter?


    Actually, I stand corrected, you did Women's Studies after all.
    Banter? I take it by your ad hominem attacks that you have studied nothing worthy of a university degree, much less any degree that stresses reasoning.

    I am still waiting on someone to tell me what is studied in a WMST degree and to offer any clear reasons for the label it has received.

    I'm starting to wonder if no one has because no one has a clue

    My point is that it seems that the same people stressing rigour in education are the same people operating from received "wisdom,", ignorance, and prejudice rather than thinking any reasoned thoughts of their own.

    And I'm speaking not only in defense of WMST, but in defense of most, if not all, of the degrees listed under "MM degrees." I have no reason to take this personally; my law degree is listed under the "approved" courses by GroupThink, after all.
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    (Original post by TercioOfParma)
    I am taking the piss because you went "muh orthographical error", which was a pathetic response. There are no issues with women in particular, I am almost certain I have a better understanding of both of the issues you bring up in this post.You are completely legally equal to a man.
    Wrong person.

    P.S My iPad keyboard is set to Czech or Spanish for the majority of the day - not English. (As such the letters are in different places... if that connection is too much for you to make.)
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    Well society has become more difficult for young people, it's harder to get job's. Some employers want both degree's and experience. I think it's good to do a degree that you enjoy and are passionate about, people who bash the 'bad' degrees have not even studied the degree which baffles me. :laugh: :laugh:
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    But surely, people do degrees for more than one reason. You are assuming people do a degree for employment purposes. I am considering doing a degree to expand my mind, and learn about something I'm interested in (BA (Honours) Politics, Philosophy and Economics)

    Why should I be discouraged from doing this, just because maybe someone somewhere in the world thinks it is a rubbish degree?
 
 
 
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