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Poll shows majority of British people support burqa ban watch

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    (Original post by Josb)
    The Quran doesn't mention the burqa/niqab, it would be difficult to read passages about these clothes.
    If the Qur'an doesn't mention the burqa or niqab, how have they been able to define it as a symbol of religious extremism? I'm not a Muslim, presumably that means I would be allowed to wear it since they would not suspect there is religious motivation. Those burkinis looks very much like wetsuits, I would get away with wearing one much more than a brown woman I'm sure.


    The whole thing is a mess of hypocrisy, inconsistency and pandering to the worst feelings in people.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    It is made compulsory by the vilest regime on earth.
    As is paying taxes. Are taxes, therefore, also a symbol of extremism?
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    (Original post by Josb)
    By your logic, any law regarding social welfare or regulating the economy shouldn't exist. Only extreme libertarians hold such views.
    *sips coffee*

    I respect everyone, even the brown people.


    In reality my libertarian views only really stretch to social issues since it's obvious that the government can maximise economic prosperity in a measurable and definite way


    (Original post by Josb)
    It was a representative poll by Yougov. The Daily Mail has nothing to do with it. But I would like a real vote on the question, the electorate is not only made of "Daily Mail reading boomers", you know.
    Guardian reading pussies are just as bad.



    (Original post by Josb)
    It is made compulsory by the vilest regime on earth.

    I don't want to ban the burqa because women that wear it kill people, but because of its meaning.
    What meaning? Some girls are just more comfortable wearing it, leave them alone.
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    (Original post by JRKinder)
    I agree with everything you've written 100%. In principle I would support a ban (definitely in places in need of high security, such as airports or banks) and because it's a symbol of oppression, but at the same time I struggle with the fact that it's breaching basic liberty to wear what you like. Whilst I'm sure many women have no choice in the matter, I'm sure some out there probably do actually choose to wear it (sad, but no less a choice) so it's a difficult one. I think if it came down to it I probably would be in favour of banning it, but tentatively due to these reservations.
    To say that we can wear what we want is a nonsense. There are norms here and we can't really break them. Nobody else can cover their face, so I don't know why some people should receive special treatment.
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    (Original post by lawyer3c)
    As is paying taxes. Are taxes, therefore, also a symbol of extremism?
    :rolleyes:
    Taxes are compulsory everywhere, not only in the IS or KSA.

    (Original post by DicksOut4Haraam)
    If the Qur'an doesn't mention the burqa or niqab, how have they been able to define it as a symbol of religious extremism? .
    Because some people have added texts to the Quran for political purpose; they then claim it's religious to get approval without discussion.
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    (Original post by YaliaV)
    To say that we can wear what we want is a nonsense. There are norms here and we can't really break them. Nobody else can cover their face, so I don't know why some people should receive special treatment.
    Did you even read my post, I stated that I believe covered faces are a security hazard and should not be allowed. What I meant, aside from security, was that the government shouldn't be allowed to tell people what to and what not to wear. I'm conflicted because it's a beneficial policy if the woman is forced to wear it by her husband (which does happen in lots of cases), but on the few cases that she does genuinely choose to wear it the state would be interfering with her freedom to choose what she wears. But in the end I have to go down the line of security and the potential for public intimidation and vote to ban it, if such a vote ever arises.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    :rolleyes:

    Because some people have added texts to the Quran for political purpose; they then claim it's religious to get approval without discussion.
    which texts?
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    (Original post by DicksOut4Haraam)
    which texts?
    Hadiths.
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    If this is true, I have list all faith in Britain. I'm emigrating.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    I'm aware of that, which is why the case would probably be even weaker.
    I'm sure even you recognise the difference between political uniforms (which will certainly be worn in public during election times) and religious clothing that is "kind of" political.
    It's only a matter of time before we see Islamist parties. The link will be much more obvious then.
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    (Original post by Platopus)
    If this is true, I have list all faith in Britain. I'm emigrating.
    To where?
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    I find that in all this debate we don't hear much from the women behind the Burqa's
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    (Original post by Josb)
    Hadiths.
    you can't really argue that the niqab/burqa is not Islamic becuase it's not in the Qur'an if it's in the Hadiths and Muslims still use them as guidelines for their lives.
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    (Original post by JRKinder)
    Did you even read my post, I stated that I believe covered faces are a security hazard and should not be allowed. What I meant, aside from security, was that the government shouldn't be allowed to tell people what to and what not to wear. I'm conflicted because it's a beneficial policy if the woman is forced to wear it by her husband (which does happen in lots of cases), but on the few cases that she does genuinely choose to wear it the state would be interfering with her freedom to choose what she wears. But in the end I have to go down the line of security and the potential for public intimidation and vote to ban it, if such a vote ever arises.
    We are told how to behave and even what we can/can't wear to an extent. That's part and parcel of being in a society. Everybody has their freedoms interfered with every day.

    Would you object to people hiding their faces in general? Do you think it's acceptable in certain cases because it's "cultural"? Why should it be acceptable for some and not for others?
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    (Original post by YaliaV)
    We are told how to behave and even what we can/can't wear to an extent. That's part and parcel of being in a society. Everybody has their freedoms interfered with every day.

    Would you object to people hiding their faces in general? Do you think it's acceptable in certain cases because it's "cultural"? Why should it be acceptable for some and not for others?
    I'd argue that people should be allowed to wear whatever they want as long as it does not incite violence or have pornographic images or whatever. Obviously everyone has their own tastes, and I certainly don't approve of some of the things people do wear, but that doesn't mean anyone should have the right to stop them from wearing it.

    Yes, I object to people hiding their faces in general. You can't walk around wearing a balaclava or motorbike helmet, so the same should apply to the burqa. No, it isn't acceptable because it's 'cultural'; if it's a security hazard then it should be banned regardless of where the garment originates from. When have I said it's acceptable for some, but not others? I think you're misinterpreting what I'm saying.
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    (Original post by lawyer3c)
    As is paying taxes. Are taxes, therefore, also a symbol of extremism?
    How are they same?:lol:

    Possibly one of the worst false equivalencies possible. And you're a lawyer/aspiring lawyer? *Pretty much all countries have taxes. You implement them because you need it to operate. Saudi implements compulsory Burqa wearing because they're Salifist nuthouse of zealotry and oppression.*

    "Yeah but Britain has a minister for agriculture, just like Saudi. So.....executing homosexuals is ok....?"*
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    (Original post by KimKallstrom)
    How are they same?:lol:

    Possibly one of the worst false equivancies possible. And you're a lawyer/aspiring lawyer?!*
    2dense4me
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    I can't support such legislation. Banning items of clothing (obviously I'm not saying you should be able to wear stuff with hate speech like "kill all black people" on it lol) is wrong and extremely authoritarian.

    It is everybody's right to wear stupid things. I do however worry about the fact that loads of Muslim women are in families and communities that would completely destroy their lives for not wearing it though. That's if they don't disown them completely of course.

    Still, banning clothing is not the way a decent society operates. Leave that retardation to Saudis and Afghans etc*
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    (Original post by lawyer3c)
    2dense4me
    If you can't see why your point was asinine then I don't hold out much hope for your future posts.*
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    (Original post by CrazySkittles)
    The burqa is not compulsory. It's a rule or law from the country of which that muslim is from. For example Tantawi it's compulsory but the religion doesn't say it is. It's more of a culture. The Hijab or Head scarf is however compulsory by law in Islam.
    Yeah i thought it would be a cultural thing if not religious. This doesn't mean just because its cultural they shouldn't wear it, you can't change someones culture.
 
 
 
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