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    (Original post by NewtonsApple)
    I thought he must have been, he must have had an exceptional interview. He's competing against the strongest mathematicians in the world by applying to Trinity as an international! Congratulations to him though.

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    Yeah, he deserved it.
    But I would still like to point out that there's a difference between being brilliant at maths and being brilliant enough to win IMO gold.

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    (Original post by souktik)
    No, he's brilliant. His interviewer gave up asking questions after a while and asked him to teach something instead. And called him a "true mathematician" in the end. Did the IPhO guys apply for physics or maths? And why weren't they pooled?

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    I don't know why they were rejected. Maybe they didn't have very good interviews. They applied for maths and physics I think.

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    (Original post by souktik)
    Yeah, he deserved it.
    But I would still like to point out that there's a difference between being brilliant at maths and being brilliant enough to win IMO gold.

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    Agreed. However, even though your friend didn't get an IMO Gold, he was probably stronger at the style of maths studied at University, a different syllabus to the Olympiad syllabus. The IMO and the Cambridge Tripos, or University Maths are two different beasts. Given the fact that he made it to an IMO Shortlist, and was good at 'University Maths' is probably why he stood out as exceptional I think. Although IMO students are almost always good at uni maths, they probably enjoyed teaching him and he gave a good impression to the tutors, which certainly accounts for a lot. Otherwise they most likely wouldn't want you despite your ability, which is true for any top university I suppose.
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    (Original post by fluteflute)
    I admit to not knowing anything about international entry for Trinity mathematics, but I can't see a reason why it would be much more competitive.
    Just curious, why would that be the case? I mean you'd have a larger pool of talent with internationals, so naturally if you attract the best, there would be tougher competition than with domestic applicants only a handful of which are likely to have achieved the same in terms of Olympiad achievement?
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    (Original post by NewtonsApple)
    Just curious, why would that be the case? I mean you'd have a larger pool of talent with internationals, so naturally if you attract the best, there would be tougher competition than with domestic applicants only a handful of which are likely to have achieved the same in terms of Olympiad achievement?
    Because usually at Oxford and Cambridge then UK students and international students are competing for the same places, there's not a set number of international spaces.
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    (Original post by fluteflute)
    Because usually at Oxford and Cambridge then UK students and international students are competing for the same places, there's not a set number of international spaces.
    Sorry, but I'm not fully knowledgeable about the admissions process, so correct me if I'm wrong.

    From the Cambridge admissions policy listed on their website:

    "Just over 10% of our undergraduates (around 1200 students) are from overseas, representing more than 120 countries. "

    And furthermore:

    "Cambridge is fortunate in that it continues to attract many talented international applicants. Competition for places amongst international students is therefore fierce. Academic achievement and potential remain the criteria for the selection of all undergraduates and no priority is given to those who pay the overseas rate of fees."

    So roughly 90% of places are for domestic students, and 10% are for internationals. So Im just wondering why that they are competing for the same places? Surely if they only have just over 10% of places, and there is a wider pool of talent it would be harder to get into?

    I'm not entirely sure about Oxford though, so please correct me if I'm wrong.
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    (Original post by NewtonsApple)
    Agreed. However, even though your friend didn't get an IMO Gold, he was probably stronger at the style of maths studied at University, a different syllabus to the Olympiad syllabus. The IMO and the Cambridge Tripos, or University Maths are two different beasts. Given the fact that he made it to an IMO Shortlist, and was good at 'University Maths' is probably why he stood out as exceptional I think. Although IMO students are almost always good at uni maths, they probably enjoyed teaching him and he gave a good impression to the tutors, which certainly accounts for a lot. Otherwise they most likely wouldn't want you despite your ability, which is true for any top university I suppose.
    Fair point. I don't know even a single high school student who knows more college maths than him. As I said, the interviewer asked him to teach an undergrad topic in the end.

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    (Original post by NewtonsApple)
    Sorry, but I'm not fully knowledgeable about the admissions process, so correct me if I'm wrong.

    From the Cambridge admissions policy listed on their website:

    "Just over 10% of our undergraduates (around 1200 students) are from overseas, representing more than 120 countries. "

    And furthermore:

    "Cambridge is fortunate in that it continues to attract many talented international applicants. Competition for places amongst international students is therefore fierce. Academic achievement and potential remain the criteria for the selection of all undergraduates and no priority is given to those who pay the overseas rate of fees."

    So roughly 90% of places are for domestic students, and 10% are for internationals. So Im just wondering why that they are competing for the same places? Surely if they only have just over 10% of places, and there is a wider pool of talent it would be harder to get into?

    I'm not entirely sure about Oxford though, so please correct me if I'm wrong.

    Also, I thought I would include the sources:

    http://www.study.cam.ac.uk/undergraduate/info/international.html


    http://www.study.cam.ac.uk/undergrad...rnational.html
    10% is just the current figure, it's not strictly a quota. But yes, I suppose it's a little more difficult for international students to get admitted. I doubt that the disparity would be comparable to that at top American unis, though.

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    (Original post by NewtonsApple)
    Sorry, but I'm not fully knowledgeable about the admissions process, so correct me if I'm wrong.

    From the Cambridge admissions policy listed on their website:

    "Just over 10% of our undergraduates (around 1200 students) are from overseas, representing more than 120 countries. "

    And furthermore:

    "Cambridge is fortunate in that it continues to attract many talented international applicants. Competition for places amongst international students is therefore fierce. Academic achievement and potential remain the criteria for the selection of all undergraduates and no priority is given to those who pay the overseas rate of fees."

    So roughly 90% of places are for domestic students, and 10% are for internationals. So Im just wondering why that they are competing for the same places? Surely if they only have just over 10% of places, and there is a wider pool of talent it would be harder to get into?

    I'm not entirely sure about Oxford though, so please correct me if I'm wrong.
    What souktik says is the summary:
    (Original post by souktik)
    10% is just the current figure, it's not strictly a quota.
    But I see what you're saying, in particular "competition for places amongst international students is therefore fierce" does seem to suggest international students are competing only with each other (and therefore UK students are competing only with each other).

    However they also say "Academic achievement and potential remain the criteria for the selection of all undergraduates and no priority is given to those who pay the overseas rate of fees." and the implication (and what I always assumed) is that there's no priority given the other way around.

    But I agree that if that is true, it seems strange that both only 16%* for Oxford and 12% Cambridge's undergraduates are internationals. For a large part it's down to international students not applying, as only about 30% of Oxford applicants and 17% Cambridge applicants are internationals. But UK students are approximately twice as likely to take up a place. The question then is are international applicants really weaker? Is it believable that lots just apply, and are just weak applicants? Or are unaware of what the universities are looking for? (e.g. make applications not focusing on academics, like you might make to a US university). That would explain why the numbers are low. If not it suggests that internationals are discriminated against. It's certainly not clear that that is the case.

    * I've found contradictory figures on this, so I'm not very confident in this number
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    (Original post by NewtonsApple)
    While I think it would be incredible to study at an ivy league US university for a PhD, I'm pretty sure I wouldnt get in as an international. The international competition for Cambridge at least as far as I know is intense to the extent that unless you have a gold medal at the IMO you could very likely be rejected by Trinity. (I had a friend who applied to Trinity last year with a gold medal in the APMO and got rejected). The competition puts me off, and I think it would probably be easier for me to get into Oxford/Cambridge for a masters as opposed to Princeton or Harvard. But it's definitely something I would consider if I knew there was a chance for me like, at Stanford, if it was possible for someone like me.

    Also I'm not sure I want to go to the US for a PhD, since I intend to drop out after the masters!

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    Ph.D application is very fair. You won't be disadvantaged because you're interntional. That being said, academics and proven ability to do research is the only criteria for admissions. So go publish 2 research papers and you will have a good chance at MIT etc. I'm going to forget about the rejection and focus on my theoretical machine learning research now Good luck!

    Also, you don't need to pay any tuition; they pay you instead!
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    (Original post by souktik)
    It looks like only MAT guys are posting.

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    Congratulations on the offer from St. John's by the way!

    I also applied there for Maths and Philosophy, but I'll be at Pembroke next year after being reallocated Who knows, maybe I'll see you around the maths department!
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    (Original post by alexmufc1995)
    Congratulations on the offer from St. John's by the way!

    I also applied there for Maths and Philosophy, but I'll be at Pembroke next year after being reallocated Who knows, maybe I'll see you around the maths department!
    Congratulations to you too! And yeah, maybe we will.

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    (Original post by SherlockHolmes)
    Unfortunately not

    I was happy to receive an interview let alone an offer to be honest. My firm choice is now Imperial, so I'm not too disappointed.
    See you next year!
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    (Original post by chriselle15)
    See you next year!
    Yeah hopefully! I need a 2 in STEP II or III to meet the offer though...
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    (Original post by SherlockHolmes)
    Yeah hopefully! I need a 2 in STEP II or III to meet the offer though...
    Wow, what did you apply for?
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    (Original post by TSR561)
    Wow, what did you apply for?
    Imperial I believe.
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    (Original post by TSR561)
    Wow, what did you apply for?
    Imperial.
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    (Original post by SherlockHolmes)
    Yeah hopefully! I need a 2 in STEP II or III to meet the offer though...
    You can do it! I'm freaking out as well don't worry. Does everyone have the STEP offer or is it only for certain people?
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    (Original post by SherlockHolmes)
    Imperial.
    Sorry, I meant course
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    (Original post by chriselle15)
    You can do it! I'm freaking out as well don't worry. Does everyone have the STEP offer or is it only for certain people?
    Thanks. I don't think many people have a STEP offer from Imperial unless they didn't sit the MAT exam. I did sit the MAT exam so I'm probably a borderline applicant. Nice to have the offer though!

    (Original post by TSR561)
    Sorry, I meant course
    I have applied for straight Maths.
 
 
 
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