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    Does anyone have any experience with reapplying while starting at another university? I was rejected last year for Economics and Management post-interview and am still interested in trying to get in. I'm attending NYU this fall for Economics and Mathematics, so that could help my chances I'm assuming.

    Questions:

    1. Should I rewrite my personal statement? I spent a lot of time on it and still feel that it's applicable. I'd definitely add some new experiences, but is starting from scratch advised?

    2. How should I try to strengthen my interview skills? Will my courses at university be sufficient enough?

    3. Would it be advised to apply to a different college? I did random last year and got Keble, which I really liked while there, but would it hurt my chances to choose Keble? Are there any colleges that prefer mature applicants?

    Here are the stats that I'm applying with(I'm from the US):

    ACT 33
    SAT Mathematics II 800
    AP Calculus AB 5
    AP Statistics 5
    AP Microeconomics 4
    AP Macroeconomic 4

    Last year I got a 65.6 on the TSA, which I think I can improve, 65.3 in critical thinking and 65.8 in problem solving.
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    (Original post by ylmdk)
    I didn't start to use UCAS yet, but to be sure to not to miss deadline because of posting process, is there anything that I should post to England(I'm international) that couldn't be send electronically? My exam scores are accessible in Collegeboard now, and I don't know if there is a different process for those scores. Also one new score will be available before TSA, but after 15 oct. , how can I inform Oxford about that score? Just updating UCAS is enough?
    Depending on your subject, graded written work might be required. May have changed, but at least a couple of years ago they wanted original work, not a scan.
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    Hi guys I was considering Cambridge for quite a while but I'm now starting to consider Oxford instead as I just think I seem better suited to it. The main thing I like about Oxford is that the admissions tests are early on whereas with Cambridge everything would hang on achieving a good enough mark in the step papers.

    GCSE grades: 6A* 5A
    A-Levels: 3A* , Maths Physics and Art
    Course: Engineering/Maths/Physics (Undecided)

    I've completed my A2's and I'm now doing a third year at sixth form to do AS and A2 further maths and AS photography.
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    Would anyone happen to have any insight into why the entrance requirement for Physics is not A*A*A? It's incredibly competitive and I would imagine that most offer holders go on to get A*s in at least Maths and Physics, probably even in Further Maths? For Engineering it's A*A*A but that course is nowhere near as competitive as Physics..
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    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    Would anyone happen to have any insight into why the entrance requirement for Physics is not A*A*A? It's incredibly competitive and I would imagine that most offer holders go on to get A*s in at least Maths and Physics, probably even in Further Maths? For Engineering it's A*A*A but that course is nowhere near as competitive as Physics..
    Maybe because they think the other parts of their admissions process tell them more about the person's ability than grades? Medicine's even more competitive than Physics yet their entry requirement is also 'only' A*AA. When I was applying for my subject, they said they're not massively bothered about what grades you get as long as you get the standard offer since they use the interview to decide who they want and who they don't and I guess it's a similar thing for Physics - they're probably fairly confident with who they've chosen because of tons of information they gather about their applicants so they just use A Levels as a basic competency check? I don't know why there's such a difference within the sciences though, Chemistry for instance is one of the least competitive subjects (at least in terms of applications per place, which doesn't tell you everything) yet their entry requirement is A*A*A.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    I don't know why there's such a difference within the sciences though, Chemistry for instance is one of the least competitive subjects (at least in terms of applications per place, which doesn't tell you everything) yet their entry requirement is A*A*A.
    I surprised there isn't some sort of Chemistry aptitude test to reduce the workload on interview days. Maybe because, like you say, it's a lot less competitive than other subjects?
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    (Original post by KingKumar)
    I surprised there isn't some sort of Chemistry aptitude test to reduce the workload on interview days. Maybe because, like you say, it's a lot less competitive than other subjects?
    I understand that generally, Oxford tries to interview around 3 applicants for every place they have. Because subjects like Chemistry simply don't attract that many applications, they can afford to just interview most people (all serious applicants). I think that's the same reason why some of the other "less popular" sciences like Biological Sciences, Earth Sciences and Biochemistry don't have aptitude tests either. Having said that, there are some "less popular" subjects that do have admissions tests like Classics and Materials Science, I can't really explain that. Maybe they feel it would be difficult to make an aptitude test for Chemistry (that's certainly true in the case of Earth Sciences where a fair aptitude test would be practically impossible because of how broad the course is).
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    Maybe because they think the other parts of their admissions process tell them more about the person's ability than grades? Medicine's even more competitive than Physics yet their entry requirement is also 'only' A*AA. When I was applying for my subject, they said they're not massively bothered about what grades you get as long as you get the standard offer since they use the interview to decide who they want and who they don't and I guess it's a similar thing for Physics - they're probably fairly confident with who they've chosen because of tons of information they gather about their applicants so they just use A Levels as a basic competency check? I don't know why there's such a difference within the sciences though, Chemistry for instance is one of the least competitive subjects (at least in terms of applications per place, which doesn't tell you everything) yet their entry requirement is A*A*A.
    I think the vast majority physics offer holders will definitely meet their entry requirements but the ability to think abstractly and approach physics problems creatively and mathematically is not necessarily something that is tested in A-level exams.

    Law is one of their most competitive courses, as well as PPE, and they all require AAA, so I guess it follows that entry requirements do not reflect how difficult it is to get on the course. But A*AA for subjects such as Computer Science and Physics?! I'd have thought that for CS they'd at least want A*A* in maths and further maths..

    Also, do you know why you have to take the MAT for Computer Science and Philosophy, but not for Computer Science on its own? Or is that just an error on the website?
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    How strict are Oxford on GCSEs for biomedical sciences? I know I would have to do the BMAT ...
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    has anyone started writing their personal statements yet?
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    (Original post by KingKumar)
    I surprised there isn't some sort of Chemistry aptitude test to reduce the workload on interview days. Maybe because, like you say, it's a lot less competitive than other subjects?
    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    I understand that generally, Oxford tries to interview around 3 applicants for every place they have. Because subjects like Chemistry simply don't attract that many applications, they can afford to just interview most people (all serious applicants).
    There have been moves to introduce an admissions test for chemistry but I guess it hasn't gained enough support yet. You're right that introducing an admissions test when there are still few enough applicants to interview almost everyone could be seen as an unnecessary additional burden, even though it would give the tutors more information to base their decisions on. The additional information that the admissions tests provide must be the main reason for keeping them for the less oversubscribed courses that you mentioned.

    I don't agree that you couldn't have a fair admissions test if the Oxford course is very broad – after all, the admissions test could be used to see how applicants would deal with one part of the course while interviews focused on another, if you could interview a large enough proportion of applicants. I would imagine it's more likely that the A levels people study (i.e. OCR chemistry vs AQA chemistry, etc.) don't overlap enough to create a test that would be equally approachable for students on different boards while also providing meaningful differentiation between candidates.

    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    Also, do you know why you have to take the MAT for Computer Science and Philosophy, but not for Computer Science on its own? Or is that just an error on the website?
    You do sit MAT for comp sci. (link)
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    (Original post by BJack)
    I don't agree that you couldn't have a fair admissions test if the Oxford course is very broad – after all, the admissions test could be used to see how applicants would deal with one part of the course while interviews focused on another, if you could interview a large enough proportion of applicants. I would imagine it's more likely that the A levels people study (i.e. OCR chemistry vs AQA chemistry, etc.) don't overlap enough to create a test that would be equally approachable for students on different boards while also providing meaningful differentiation between candidates.
    Sorry if there was any misunderstanding, when I was talking about not being able to make an admissions test due to the broadness of the course I was talking about Earth Sciences rather than Chemistry.
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    (Original post by mattpas)
    has anyone started writing their personal statements yet?
    Yeah my school wanted my first draft in before we even broke up for the summer, so now I'm on my fourth and almost finished
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    (Original post by googolplexity)
    Yeah my school wanted my first draft in before we even broke up for the summer, so now I'm on my fourth and almost finished
    Does your school give you a lot of support for the statement? I'm a French student and they really dont give any as few people apply to the UK. I was wondering if there was a place where i could get my drafts reread by students for cheap?
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    (Original post by mattpas)
    Does your school give you a lot of support for the statement? I'm a French student and they really dont give any as few people apply to the UK. I was wondering if there was a place where i could get my drafts reread by students for cheap?
    Depending on what subject you are applying for, I could point you in the direction of such a place :ninja:
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Depending on what subject you are applying for, I could point you in the direction of such a place :ninja:
    PPE, willing to spend up to 10£
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    (Original post by mattpas)
    PPE, willing to spend up to 10£
    Hmm, not sure the place I was thinking of can do PPE (very few reviewers), sorry
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Hmm, not sure the place I was thinking of can do PPE (very few reviewers), sorry
    No problem, thanks though!
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    (Original post by mattpas)
    PPE, willing to spend up to 10£

    I'd suggest Jamie Mills. Former PPE student. The fee is 20£ apparently, but think he offers more than what you want.
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    (Original post by Bearbert)
    I'd suggest Jamie Mills. Former PPE student. The fee is 20£ apparently, but think he offers more than what you want.
    What does he do in addition to proofreading and commenting?
 
 
 
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