Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by micky022)
    I'm teaching myself to write English in Cyrillic, before I plunge into Russian.
    (Original post by micky022)
    фор ехампле, тчис ис цыриллиц ат итс бест. и тчинк. и чопе...
    Haha, that's quite amusing. Berlin sells a lot of postcards with that done for German.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jenny18)
    ---
    (Original post by M'Ling)
    ---
    I've only just received my list (History and English - History is optional [therefore none!] and English is Old English and Victorian) so I've made very little progress. Luckily, I've read some of the compulsories like Bleak House, Heart of Darkness, and Picture of Dorian Gray, but I'm way, way behind :ashamed2: So ashamed, already struggling...

    Anyway, I'm reading Eliot's Middlemarch (and making notes on themes, narrative etc.) but I'm finding that really tough, so it's going to take me about a week to read and understand it. I'm only a third of the way through. I hope I find Elizabeth Gaskell's works easier to follow - don't get me wrong, I've found Middlemarch to be entertaining ("I was not speaking in a religious sense, Harriet. I spoke as a mother." and "Not that marrying is everything. I would have you seek first the kingdom of God. But a girl should keep her heart with in her own power." being my favourite lines thus far), but her syntax is often hard to follow. Maybe that's just me.

    With David Copperfield, Mary Barton and poetry anthologies, I won't be able to read any more Victorian. Old English... I'll read Hamer's translations of Anglo-Saxon poems and possible Beowulf, alongside an Introduction to Literary Studies by Bennett and Royle, as it's easy to read. I can't manage much more.

    Also, I've read Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil and it's a very good read. It's split into chapters and further into aphorisms, so you can take say five at a time and go through them. Some of them are hard to follow if you're new to philosophy (which I was/still am!), but some are either witty or so fascinating that you can almost glide over them and understand it all...

    As for reading extra Gaskell? Well I really wanted to read some Hardy, so I managed Tess of the D'Urbervilles and Return of the Native before I felt guilty for prevaricating, even though I don't think that they're mentioned on the list. Jude the Obscure might be. I really wanted to read Dracula and find other Victorian Gothics, but I can't ignore the list! Anyway, I can't imagine that the Oxford tutors will get made and throw a brick/any book by Dickens at you for wanting to read around the area. It's all relevant! According to the term schedule they sent me for my course/college (HENG Pembroke), Mary Barton and North and South are both in Week 3's Social Issues in the Victorian Novel.

    Anyone else set an essay to write for their first tutorial?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by micky022)
    фор ехампле, тчис ис цыриллиц ат итс бест. и тчинк. и чопе...
    lol

    That puts my French struggle into perspective. Though I'm blitzing it now! A page every half an hour, which is a stratospheric improvement when it was initially a page per week. So, are you heading up to Oxford for straight Russian, or a joint school?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JAR12)
    Heart of Darkness
    Thats about Belgins in the Congo right?

    What's it like, I was thinking of getting it
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Apparently I'll be getting a list for philosophy after A-level results, which could be interesting.

    German bookshops seem to have much more stuff oriented to classics and academia than British ones; there's a brilliant place in Berlin which tempts me whenever I go in with things like Descartes in Latin/German...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by M'Ling)
    Hello offer-holders!

    I currently hold an offer for English, and was wondering how far into reading lists people are? I've just come back from holiday and, basically, have read nothing since finishing A-Levels!
    I haven't received a reading list from the college, although I presume (results pending) after the 18th August they might send one perhaps?!?
    What sort of things are people reading to prepare themselves for first year? I know we do Victorian, although I'm not sure I have time now to read several 500+ page books :/ , and I've read things like Beowulf (translated of course!) and The Canterbury Tales (again, sadly, a modern translation) to prepare for the Old-Middle English bits of the first year.
    I was going to just read some Dickens and 19th Century poets, as I've read quite a lot of Gothic and Sensation Novel anyway for my own enjoyment, but I imagine we do more than the 'obvious' writers, and I don't want to be miles behind before term even starts!
    .

    Thank you, sorry for the essay
    Hiya. Well you've certainly read more of your reading list than I had when I first received mine!! I think I had read Beowulf, but I wasn't into Victorian literature before this summer holiday! I am enjoying it now, especially Gaskell and Ruskin. Good luck with your reading!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by micky022)
    фор ехампле, тчис ис цыриллиц ат итс бест. и тчинк. и чопе...
    Я думаю, что я нeнавижу тебя для делал это. Не может читать!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yafoubnx)
    Я думаю, что я нeнавижу тебя для делал это. Не может читать!
    You realise the original post is in English, yes?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JAR12)
    I've only just received my list (History and English - History is optional [therefore none!] and English is Old English and Victorian) so I've made very little progress. Luckily, I've read some of the compulsories like Bleak House, Heart of Darkness, and Picture of Dorian Gray, but I'm way, way behind :ashamed2: So ashamed, already struggling...

    Anyway, I'm reading Eliot's Middlemarch (and making notes on themes, narrative etc.) but I'm finding that really tough, so it's going to take me about a week to read and understand it. I'm only a third of the way through. I hope I find Elizabeth Gaskell's works easier to follow - don't get me wrong, I've found Middlemarch to be entertaining ("I was not speaking in a religious sense, Harriet. I spoke as a mother." and "Not that marrying is everything. I would have you seek first the kingdom of God. But a girl should keep her heart with in her own power." being my favourite lines thus far), but her syntax is often hard to follow. Maybe that's just me.

    With David Copperfield, Mary Barton and poetry anthologies, I won't be able to read
    any more Victorian. Old English... I'll read Hamer's translations of Anglo-Saxon poems
    and possible Beowulf, alongside an Introduction to Literary Studies by Bennett and
    Royle, as it's easy to read. I can't manage much more.

    Also, I've read Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil and it's a very good read. It's split into chapters and further into aphorisms, so you can take say five at a time and go through them. Some of them are hard to follow if you're new to philosophy (which I was/still am!), but some are either witty or so fascinating that you can almost glide over them and understand it all...

    As for reading extra Gaskell? Well I really wanted to read some Hardy, so I managed Tess of the D'Urbervilles and Return of the Native before I felt guilty for prevaricating,
    even though I don't think that they're mentioned on the list. Jude the Obscure might be. I really wanted to read Dracula and find other Victorian Gothics, but I can't ignore the list! Anyway, I can't imagine that the Oxford tutors will get made and throw a brick/any book by Dickens at you for wanting to read around the area. It's all relevant! According to the term schedule they sent me for my course/college (HENG Pembroke), Mary Barton and North and South are both in Week 3's Social Issues in the Victorian Novel.

    Anyone else set an essay to write for their first tutorial?
    Hello!!

    You're so lucky, I want to read north and south, but cranford is gaskell's only novel on the list. As for essays, mini ones were suggested, but no specific titles. I haven't done any yet, I perhaps should do something, or at least some plans for the stuff I have read. What is your essay on??
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by deFossard)
    lol

    That puts my French struggle into perspective. Though I'm blitzing it now! A page every half an hour, which is a stratospheric improvement when it was initially a page per week. So, are you heading up to Oxford for straight Russian, or a joint school?
    I'm doing Law
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bestofyou)
    Thats about Belgins in the Congo right?

    What's it like, I was thinking of getting it
    I love it, and had the luck to do a creative-writing piece on it for AS coursework. It's a small book but there's a lot of symbolism packed into each sentence, so it's dense. Fantastic novel, if a bit bleak - the most pessimistic book I've ever read, and I've read some of Dostoyevsky's works!

    (Original post by jenny18)
    Hello!!

    You're so lucky, I want to read north and south, but cranford is gaskell's only novel on the list. As for essays, mini ones were suggested, but no specific titles. I haven't done any yet, I perhaps should do something, or at least some plans for the stuff I have read. What is your essay on??
    No more than 2,500 words, in reference to at least 2 novels by Dickens and other Victorian novels, if I want (which I do not), either:
    a) 'In Dickens, external and physical settings are also interior landscapes'. Discuss.
    b) "She is somebody's child - anybody's - nobody's" (Little Dorrit). Discuss the significance of parentage or inheritance in Dicken's novels.
    I've read Bleak House (for A2 coursework Yay!) so I only have to read Copperfield/Little Dorrit. (b) might be a safer option, but (a) sounds interesting - there's lots of pathetic fallacy in Bleak House, and the settings are all really symbolic.



    Edit: Would any single/joint English applicants want to share reading lists, purely to see what others are doing? Also just to be nosey :popout:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yafoubnx)
    Я думаю, что я нeнавижу тебя для делал это. Не может читать!
    Ya, dumayu, chto ya nenavezhu tebya delya delal zto. Ne mozhet chetatb!

    I think?

    Sorry fella, I'm still trying to master Cyrillic before I even attempt Chapter One of my book... Give me a month or so

    I'm currently transcribing Deuteronomy 21:1-9 into English in Cyrillic to try and learn the characters.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by micky022)
    Ya, dumayu, chto ya nenavezhu tebya delya delal zto. Ne mozhet chetatb!

    I think?

    Sorry fella, I'm still trying to master Cyrillic before I even attempt Chapter One of my book... Give me a month or so

    I'm currently transcribing Deuteronomy 21:1-9 into English in Cyrillic to try and learn the characters.
    I'm glad I did Greek at school, it makes figuring out Cyrillic so much easier. I signed up to a Russian course here but the course turned out not to exist, which was a pain. Might try and find a different one if I can be bothered; I'd love to speak Russian.

    Why Deuteronomy? Pick something fun. :p:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dbmag9)
    I'm glad I did Greek at school, it makes figuring out Cyrillic so much easier. I signed up to a Russian course here but the course turned out not to exist, which was a pain. Might try and find a different one if I can be bothered; I'd love to speak Russian.

    Why Deuteronomy? Pick something fun. :p:
    It's an epigraph in Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets, which is possibly my favourite book ever

    I bought this. It seems alright, if a little brief at the start. Two Cyrillic exercises and it's straight into LET'S DO RUSSIAN!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by micky022)
    It's an epigraph in Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets, which is possibly my favourite book ever

    I bought this. It seems alright, if a little brief at the start. Two Cyrillic exercises and it's straight into LET'S DO RUSSIAN!
    Best of luck with it. Have you looked at the language courses Oxford offer? They look quite tempting.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dbmag9)
    Best of luck with it. Have you looked at the language courses Oxford offer? They look quite tempting.
    I have; I bought this book because it's the one the Beginners' Russian LASR course uses
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by micky022)
    I have; I bought this book because it's the one the Beginners' Russian LASR course uses
    Aha, very cunning.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jenny18)
    ...

    (Original post by M'Ling)
    ...

    (Original post by JAR12)
    ...
    Glad to hear that other people are behind with the list, I worried that it was only me! I've nearly finished Middlemarch, I'm really enjoying it, but it's just so long. I haven't had trouble with the syntax, but often feel like I'm missing out on noticing a lot of important stuff because I haven't already read it so don't know everything that will be significant, thematically etc.

    I'm just trying to get through everything that's required, and anything that is optional will only be if a miracle occurs and I get through the list. And I haven't started on the Old English yet, although have read the Introduction to Literature, Criticism and Theory. I haven't been set any essays thankfully, it's bad enough balancing reading and my strange desire to learn Italian!

    As for reading extra books, I've been keeping two books on the go, one reading list and one other, just so that I don't get too bogged down (although currently I'm rereading Inferno as my 'fun' book ), so I'd say maybe use it as a reward for getting some of the reading list books done? Also, on my list it says that any book from the period is useful, so you could use that as an excuse?

    Oh, and I think I saw someone wondering about how the reading lists differ: I laughed at my friend (who's doing English at a different college to me) as he had bits of the Bible on his, but then he had no Old/Middle English stuff at all.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dbmag9)
    You realise the original post is in English, yes?
    Of course, one gets used to Cyrillic being written in a certain manner. Certain letter combinations just hurt the eyes.


    (Original post by micky022)
    Ya, dumayu, chto ya nenavezhu tebya delya delal zto. Ne mozhet chetatb!

    I think?

    Sorry fella, I'm still trying to master Cyrillic before I even attempt Chapter One of my book... Give me a month or so

    I'm currently transcribing Deuteronomy 21:1-9 into English in Cyrillic to try and learn the characters.
    Haha, you're almost there. Russian's a real pain. The alphabet, for me at least, was actually the easiest part. Verbs of motion and perfective/imperfectives though, two years on and I'm still working on them.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shinobi93)
    Glad to hear that other people are behind with the list, I worried that it was only me! I've nearly finished Middlemarch, I'm really enjoying it, but it's just so long. I haven't had trouble with the syntax, but often feel like I'm missing out on noticing a lot of important stuff because I haven't already read it so don't know everything that will be significant, thematically etc.

    I'm just trying to get through everything that's required, and anything that is optional will only be if a miracle occurs and I get through the list. And I haven't started on the Old English yet, although have read the Introduction to Literature, Criticism and Theory. I haven't been set any essays thankfully, it's bad enough balancing reading and my strange desire to learn Italian!

    As for reading extra books, I've been keeping two books on the go, one reading list and one other, just so that I don't get too bogged down (although currently I'm rereading Inferno as my 'fun' book ), so I'd say maybe use it as a reward for getting some of the reading list books done? Also, on my list it says that any book from the period is useful, so you could use that as an excuse?

    Oh, and I think I saw someone wondering about how the reading lists differ: I laughed at my friend (who's doing English at a different college to me) as he had bits of the Bible on his, but then he had no Old/Middle English stuff at all.
    Yeah, that sounds like a plan. I think I'll finish Ruskin, then download North and South and blitz through it whilst reading poetry to keep up appearances of being a 'focused' reader. I am seriously considering doing an essay tomorrow, but since I haven't been given any possible titles, I worry that it might just be me rambling. The most interesting idead I have come up with is something to do with Ruskin, Blake and Keats, but since I haven't finished the first and have never studied the others it could still be tricky. But then again, I could do something about the presentation of women, I think that's what the list is steering me towards, what with Cranford and Middlemarch.

    It all seems so much work! But I am enjoying it, even if I now do nothing else but read.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.