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    (Original post by IBzombie)
    Oh really? where are you living? I've spent almost 8 months total in Japan over the last two years Mainly in Fukuoka.
    Wow! I am Japanese and live in Fukuoka!

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    (Original post by missjessd)
    みなさん、こんにちは! I'm a 4th year student of Japanese & Business at university, I'm about to graduate and I'm going to take N1 within the next year. I will also be moving to Japan in September. I specialise in social culture and politics/international relations, especially in the Asia Pacific. Please feel free to ask me any questions about learning Japanese, university courses or job hunting with Japanese! I'll do my best to answer. Nice to meet you all
    Hello ! I'm about to start my undergrad in Japanese and Business & Management at the University of Manchester so I have quite a few questions for you if that doesn't bother you
    Did you already know some Japanese before you started university ? What will you do in Japan and where ? What do you think of the combination Japanese/Business, are you happy with your degree or do you wish, looking back, that you'd done something else ?
    Any advice about anything ?

    Best of luck for the future !
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    (Original post by Asami)
    Wow! I am Japanese and live in Fukuoka!

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    Really? Wow ^^
    I was in Fukuoka just last month


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    (Original post by Bambirina)
    Hello ! I'm about to start my undergrad in Japanese and Business & Management at the University of Manchester so I have quite a few questions for you if that doesn't bother you
    Did you already know some Japanese before you started university ? What will you do in Japan and where ? What do you think of the combination Japanese/Business, are you happy with your degree or do you wish, looking back, that you'd done something else ?
    Any advice about anything ?

    Best of luck for the future !
    Hi, I can honestly say that I don't regret taking Japanese and Management one bit! (a lot of people don't know what 'management' is, so I usually refer to it as 'business'). I had the most amazing time, I've learned so so much, and it's really set me up for a really wide choice of careers!

    A lot of people apply for JET after they graduate, but people also go into all sorts of careers, from working for the civil service (which is what I'm doing this summer) to working in international business, translation, teaching, media... anything really! After my summer internship, I will be flying over to Japan just to have a bit of fun. I wouldn't really be looking for a job, but if I come across something that suits me, I wouldn't mind taking a job and staying for the long term.

    I didn't know much Japanese before starting, just a few phrases and I also learned hiragana and kataka before university. At Leeds University, the course is amazing, it's a very intensive course - we do 'Minna no nihongo' books 1 and 2 in the first year, and then we're off on our year abroad in our second year. I think in Manchester you do books 1 in first year, and books 2 in second year? We had a choice of dorms or host families, I chose the latter and by the time we all came back, we were pretty much conversationally fluent. We spent third year and fourth year learning to read more complicated texts, such as newspaper articles, and to talk about more complicated topics, such as politics and business.

    On the Management side, it was a bit difficult to balance two different subjects, but it's certainly possible. You need to be able to motivate yourself to do lots of reading and lots of work, even if you don't feel like it, because you will have so much to do! But, having both definitely opens up more doors than just Japanese or Management alone.

    If there's anything else, you would like to ask, feel free
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    (Original post by missjessd)
    x
    Thank you so much for your response !
    I'm really happy I chose to do Business & Management and Japanese I had an offer from Leeds as well but I didn't want to go on my year abroad in second year - I've lived in Italy, came back to France for my last year of high school, now on a gap year to China ... I could use 2 years in the same place now
    I don't know about the Minna no nihongo books but I know that we will do the Genki 1 and 2 books in first year
    I'm a bit scared of the workload but as you said, I'll have to get myself to do it. I know it'll be hard but I'm really excited to start !

    May I ask what kind of job you're looking for ?
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    I totally understand, Manchester is a good university, and with Japanese and Management, you made a really good choice of degree, which is more than can be said for a lot of people :P Genki 1 and 2 in the first year is pretty impressive too, I hope you get on well on your course!

    I never took a gap year, so I've been thinking that I'm just going to go to Japan, stay with some friends, and have lots of fun! I've been in the cycle of lessons-revision-exams for so long now, I would just love a break to just chill :cool: I don't have to worry too much about money, and since I can speak Japanese, it would just be fun to travel around the country, trying out food, seeing sights etc. I was hoping to improve my Japanese further after I graduate so that I can take JLPT N1 next year.

    I'm doing an internship for the civil service this summer before I go. I think when I come back one day, I'll go into the Diplomatic Service (google: 'Faststream'). A few people also go into this career after getting a degree in Japanese. Over the years, you will probably develop an interest (and eventually an expertise?) in a certain area about Japan - business, politics, culture, society, linguistics, history, cinema.... there are so many areas! That's probably the biggest determinant of what kind of career you would go into after graduation.
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    So excited to be studying Japanese (and french :P) at UEA this year I have a lot of free time as I'm on a gap year so I'm hoping to get to GCSE standard by the end of september so that I don't have to start ab initio , simply because I have a good ground knowledge of the basics and don't want to have to go through the painstaking process of going through things I already know. I have Genki 1 and 2, and apparently they're the books used at UEA, so I guess I'm in a good place already
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    Anyone able to interpret this for me? It was a message I got from a Japanese friend, but unfortunately I'm nowhere near that level of competence yet.

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    (Original post by Bennybo)
    Anyone able to interpret this for me? It was a message I got from a Japanese friend, but unfortunately I'm nowhere near that level of competence yet.

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    べん、ちゃん。
    Calling you Ben-chan.
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    Hello Japanese people, might I say I think you and your culture is awesome and I am hoping one day to move to Koyoto :-)
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    (Original post by Y_123456)
    べん、ちゃん。
    Calling you Ben-chan.
    Thank you!
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    (Original post by missjessd)
    みなさん、こんにちは! I'm a 4th year student of Japanese & Business at university, I'm about to graduate and I'm going to take N1 within the next year. I will also be moving to Japan in September. I specialise in social culture and politics/international relations, especially in the Asia Pacific. Please feel free to ask me any questions about learning Japanese, university courses or job hunting with Japanese! I'll do my best to answer. Nice to meet you all
    Wow, you must be excited! I'll be starting my first year at university in September and I have hopes to study in Japan for a year at Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific, or enrol onto the Study in Kyoto Program if I'm lucky, or anywhere else my university partners with. I'm curious, how long have you been learning Japanese? And what study methods have you personally found most effective? I'd love to be at N1 level within 3 years. I've recently begun focusing my energies on vocabulary and grammar after completing Heisig's RTK 1 & 3 last month.

    Also, I'd love to hear your perspective on job hunting. I'm 80/20 on teaching English in Japan as an ALT for a while, and some translation work would be rewarding, but these are just daydreams at the moment.

    よろしくね
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    (Original post by Fan service)
    Wow, you must be excited! I'll be starting my first year at university in September and I have hopes to study in Japan for a year at Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific, or enrol onto the Study in Kyoto Program if I'm lucky, or anywhere else my university partners with. I'm curious, how long have you been learning Japanese? And what study methods have you personally found most effective? I'd love to be at N1 level within 3 years. I've recently begun focusing my energies on vocabulary and grammar after completing Heisig's RTK 1 & 3 last month.

    Also, I'd love to hear your perspective on job hunting. I'm 80/20 on teaching English in Japan as an ALT for a while, and some translation work would be rewarding, but these are just daydreams at the moment.

    よろしくね
    Hi! That sounds like a very good plan. I've been studying Japanese for 4 years, I would say that I am between N2 and N1. It would be very very difficult (although I wouldn't say impossible) to be N1 level in 3 years. It will take an immense amount of daily dedication, mostly on reading (so kanji, and grammar are best to focus on to pass the test) ganbare!

    ALT work is a popular choice, and being able to speak Japanese is a bonus. If you get to N1 level, you'd be able to do translation work, which pays a lot My advice is to let your studies guide you to the area of Japanese studies that you'll become interested in, and eventually find work in that area. Good luck
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    (Original post by missjessd)
    Hi! That sounds like a very good plan. I've been studying Japanese for 4 years, I would say that I am between N2 and N1. It would be very very difficult (although I wouldn't say impossible) to be N1 level in 3 years. It will take an immense amount of daily dedication, mostly on reading (so kanji, and grammar are best to focus on to pass the test) ganbare!

    ALT work is a popular choice, and being able to speak Japanese is a bonus. If you get to N1 level, you'd be able to do translation work, which pays a lot My advice is to let your studies guide you to the area of Japanese studies that you'll become interested in, and eventually find work in that area. Good luck
    I passed N1 3.5 years after starting learning Japanese. I think that the level of N1 is heavily overestimated. I would call it intermediate level.
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    (Original post by Azimuth)
    I passed N1 3.5 years after starting learning Japanese. I think that the level of N1 is heavily overestimated. I would call it intermediate level.
    I agree... you look at N1 questions and think "how can this be the hardest level of the most widely recognized Japanese test?"
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    (Original post by Ash S)
    I agree... you look at N1 questions and think "how can this be the hardest level of the most widely recognized Japanese test?"
    I took the old level 4 (N5) exam a few years ago and recently took GCSE Japanese purely because I wanted to have something that pushed my speaking and writing skills as well as reading and listening. For me at that level it felt a more of a rounded exam.

    I guess with the JLPT structure it assumes that both your speaking and writing skills will be similar to what is being tested but I've heard stories of people who have passed N1 (this level was supposed to have been made slightly harder since 2010) who don't speak or write Japanese very well at all. Also for studying in Japan at most universities I believe the EJU test is used rather than relying on JLPT scores.

    PS-Regardless of this if anyone passes N1 after only a few years of study in Japanese then I take my hat off to them. I guess I'm just a lazy student sometimes.:rolleyes:
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    Yes, I agree, there are some aspects of N1 that are easy to learn by just memorising from textbooks, such as grammar structures. Kanji is a little harder, especially in the context of reading in a set text, but it is doable after dedicated study of around 3 years.

    However, I agree with sumo73 that a lot of people who have passed N1 in such a short amount of time suffer on the speaking front a little, mostly because of the JLPT focus on reading and complicated grammar. Plus the fact that it is multiple choice and that it can be passed after doing a fair amount of practice papers makes it much easier than the level of overall Japanese it is supposed to test for. Finally, even though it does include some keigo, one cannot necessarily be able to speak business Japanese even after having N1, which is a requirement for a lot of well paying jobs outside of English teaching in Japan.

    Of course, there are some people who can handle business/speaking very well as well as having N1, all in around 3-4 years. My hat goes off to them. Usually, this requires living in Japan for at least a year a so, rather than just purely self-study.
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    I think if you dedicate your time to studying Japanese (like doing a degree) then N1 can certainly be accomplished in a relatively short period of time (2-4 years) and I guess N1 aims to take people to an advanced "general" level in reading/writing/listening. However, past N1 there is definitely room for improvement in many areas like specific subjects / business Japanese / casual Japanese / pre-war or old Japanese etc.

    I think N1's goal is to show you are at a level from which you can adapt/adjust/focus your Japanese to any situation.

    I've lived in Japan for 2 years but I am also working teaching English so I don't have as much focused time to practice and study Japanese. In that time I've probably just about reached N3 so I take my hat off to you for managing to get to an N1 level in just 3.5 years!
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    I'll be going to the University of Edinburgh to start studying Japanese and Linguistics this year which I really can't wait for. I got a chance to speak to most of the staff in the department while there so I'm sure that I'll get on well there, as they seem like very nice and helpful people.

    To continue the discussion about the JLPT, I was told that at Edinburgh most students will pass a level of the test at the end of each year of the degree, with the most dedicated students taking both N2 and N1 at the end of the fourth year. They encourage the students there to take the tests given that it's another qualification and that the university holds the tests, so it's very convenient.
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    I have just read a comment by a girl who has two nationalities, namely the British and the Japanese one. She wrote too that she has to decide which nationality she takes after the age of 21 due to Japanese law. Why Japanese law doesn't accept two or more nationalities? I would love to know the reason.
 
 
 
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