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    (Original post by casio99)
    Quick question, how many poems should you write about for section B?
    There's been alot of debate on this - i've got a few scripts at home; 2 of them only talk about 1 poem for section B, and the other talks in detail about one, then does a small paragraph on the other.

    They got 34/40, 38/40 and 40/42 - which are all very strong A's; because of their exploration and evaluation of the one poem they chose to talk about.

    You have to make sure you explore the A0's, if the question is symbolism, don't just list 3 of Auden's/Rossetti/Tennyson/Keats poems ect that have symbolism.
    Pick one - EXPLORE and EVALUATE - and if you still have time, and feel you wanna add another poem for safety, by all means do it.

    I use this formula to help me hit the A0's.
    1) State your point using succinct language, (don't meander around the point...MAKE IT)
    2) Show evidence
    3) EXPLAIN the obvious connotations (A02)
    4) EXPLORE the various connotations explicitly focusing on the language (and form and structure if its important) but most apt quotes will generally have strong language (Stronger A02)
    5) Give conflicting viewpoints on your chosen evidence (feminism vs marxism, 1st reception audience/vs modern day, psychoanalytical vs religious) do whatever you want really, make it up even 'males vs females' (A03)
    6) Evaluate the STRENGTHS and WEAKNESSES of those interpretations (Strong A03)


    Because you have to do all of that (in the short space of time) to get a high mark - its tough to do 2/3 poems in enough detail to satisfy the mark scheme. Well that's my opinion anyway - english is pretty subjective!


    Hope it helps
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    (Original post by Popat21)
    Definitely text-by-text. Because they don't want you to be comparing authors (but still, a little bit of this is good) it's better for A01 to go text by text with a linking point between each paragraph.

    Thank you very,very much!

    Still worried if I'll be able to crack out 5 points for section B in under an hour
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    (Original post by thefirstnotlastsamurai)
    There's been on of debate about this - i've got a few scripts at home; 2 of them only talk about 1 poem for section B, and the other talks in detail about one, then does a small paragraph on the other.

    They got 34/40, 38/40 and 40/42 - which are all very strong A's; because of their exploration and evaluation of the one poem they chose to talk about.

    You have to make sure you explore the A0's, if the question is symbolism, don't just list 3 of Auden's/Rossetti/Tennyson/Keats poems ect that have symbolism.
    Pick one - EXPLORE and EVALUATE - and if you still have time, and feel you wanna add another poem for safety, by all means do it.

    I use this formula to help me hit the A0's.
    1) State your point using succinct language, (don't meander around the point...MAKE IT)
    2) Show evidence
    3) EXPLAIN the obvious connotations (A02)
    4) EXPLORE the various connotations explicitly focusing on language & form and structure if its important, but most apt quotes have strong language (Stronger A02)
    5) Give conflicting viewpoints on your chosen evidence (feminism vs marxism, 1st reception audience/vs modern day, psychoanalytical vs religious) do whatever you want really, make it up even 'males vs females' (A03)
    6) Evaluate the STRENGTHS and WEAKNESSES of those interpretations (Strong A03)


    Because you have to do all of that (in the short space of time) to get a high mark - its tough to do 2/3 poems in enough detail to satisfy the mark scheme. Well that's my opinion anyway - english is pretty subjective!


    Hope it helps

    Brilliant post that has allievated my worries a great deal. Thanks

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    (Original post by casio99)
    Brilliant post that has allievated my worries a great deal. Thanks

    No worries, we need to try and help eachother - this exam is very demanding. There is no set way to answer a question, people can take different routes, and still get the same grade. You just have to make sure you hit the A0's - like in particular for section B, use phrases like

    "The author explicitly manipulates language in order to ......."
    " In light of a .......... reading, many readers might be guided to the conclusion.......... alternatively, through aligning myself with a ............ interpretation, they may think ................... on balance a .............. reading would prove most useful as it .................

    If that makes any sense whatsoever - because then the examiner HAS to give you the marks, because your explicitly addressing the mark scheme.

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    (Original post by thefirstnotlastsamurai)
    No worries, we need to try and help eachother - this exam is very demanding. There is no set way to answer a question, people can take different routes, and still get the same grade. You just have to make sure you hit the A0's - like in particular for section B, use phrases like

    "The author explicitly manipulates language in order to ......."
    " In light of a .......... reading, many readers might be guided to the conclusion.......... alternatively, through aligning myself with a ............ interpretation, they may think ................... on balance a .............. reading would prove most useful as it .................

    If that makes any sense whatsoever - because then the examiner HAS to give you the marks, because your explicitly addressing the mark scheme.


    How much points are you looking to make in Section B?
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    (Original post by casio99)
    How much points are you looking to make in Section B?
    You have around 16 minutes per 'text' in the exam, and in that time i'd make 2-3 solid points. Again im going to back to symbols as i sincerely hope it comes up! In the kite runner - thanks to esachica, id probably have my response centred around "kites" - and i think i'd make a link to the rape scene, and then the "pomegranate tree." For gatsby - id talk about the clock and the green light. And then for Tennyson - id chose his poem 'Marianna' - mainly focus on her physical landscape being one big symbol for her mindframe, and if i have time, might incorporate abit 'Godiva' and talk about how she represents the good in mankind in contrast to the idiotic Earl.
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    (Original post by OneInSolidarity)
    In the marking criteria there are 4 assessment objectives (from memory):
    AO1 - quality of writing, terminology etc
    AO2 - Language, Form & Structure
    AO3 - Alternative interpretations
    AO4 - Context

    AO1 applies to them all.
    AO2 applies to part Ai and part B
    AO3 applies to part Aii and part B
    AO4 applies to part Aii

    If the question of part B was 'How do the authors of the texts you have studies create their characters etc.' Then you would answer the question, making sure that you fulfil all the AO's

    For example (off the top of my head): In the first chapter Amir tells us about his 'past of unatoned sins' and how it 'claws its way out', this makes the reader feel sympathy for Amir as he is apparently repentant, feeling pain, consumed by guilt for the past '27 years'. However some readers will regard him with suspicion, wondering why it took him 27 years before he tried to redeem himself - this feeling perhaps further emphasised by the fact Hosseini does not disclose his past, making the reader assume it must be terrible due to the impact it's had.

    Not my best, but it hits AO2 'past of unatoned sins', AO3 'However some readers will regard him with suspicion' and maybe AO1, 'teleological progression'.
    thannkk you! however how is that structure/form?
    ahh failing this exammm
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    (Original post by thefirstnotlastsamurai)
    There's been alot of debate on this - i've got a few scripts at home; 2 of them only talk about 1 poem for section B, and the other talks in detail about one, then does a small paragraph on the other.

    They got 34/40, 38/40 and 40/42 - which are all very strong A's; because of their exploration and evaluation of the one poem they chose to talk about.

    You have to make sure you explore the A0's, if the question is symbolism, don't just list 3 of Auden's/Rossetti/Tennyson/Keats poems ect that have symbolism.
    Pick one - EXPLORE and EVALUATE - and if you still have time, and feel you wanna add another poem for safety, by all means do it.

    I use this formula to help me hit the A0's.
    1) State your point using succinct language, (don't meander around the point...MAKE IT)
    2) Show evidence
    3) EXPLAIN the obvious connotations (A02)
    4) EXPLORE the various connotations explicitly focusing on the language (and form and structure if its important) but most apt quotes will generally have strong language (Stronger A02)
    5) Give conflicting viewpoints on your chosen evidence (feminism vs marxism, 1st reception audience/vs modern day, psychoanalytical vs religious) do whatever you want really, make it up even 'males vs females' (A03)
    6) Evaluate the STRENGTHS and WEAKNESSES of those interpretations (Strong A03)


    Because you have to do all of that (in the short space of time) to get a high mark - its tough to do 2/3 poems in enough detail to satisfy the mark scheme. Well that's my opinion anyway - english is pretty subjective!


    Hope it helps
    Very helpful, you will have some good karma for this!
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    Just another quick question...question a part a is usually structured in this way "how does...tell the story in..." or "write about...`s narrative methods in... what is the difference between the questions, or are they roughly the same just worded differently?
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    How would you hit the AO3 marks in 'The Great Gatsby'?
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    (Original post by LondonLT)
    thannkk you! however how is that structure/form?
    ahh failing this exammm
    It wasn't, that point was aimed at the language part of AO2. I'd have to make further points to him form/structure.
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    (Original post by casio99)
    How would you hit the AO3 marks in 'The Great Gatsby'?
    I'm going to try making it explicit. For example, in a symbolism question, you have the symbol of the clock which Gatsby rested his head on you can make a point about. There are 2 interpretations of this symbol, some consider it a symbol of Gatsby's hunger to reach his dream and his strong demands of time. Some might consider it symbolic of the American dream cracking under his pressure, and a clue by Fitzgerald of things to come (Gatsby failing to reach his dream).

    Obviously make 1 main strong point, and just add in the 'weaker' alternative idea with ''This symbol might also be considered as a representation of.....''. Make it explicit that you're considering different interpretations and you should get the mark. I think many symbols have possible different interpretations to them.
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    (Original post by TWF)
    I'm going to try making it explicit. For example, in a symbolism question, you have the symbol of the clock which Gatsby rested his head on you can make a point about. There are 2 interpretations of this symbol, some consider it a symbol of Gatsby's hunger to reach his dream and his strong demands of time. Some might consider it symbolic of the American dream cracking under his pressure, and a clue by Fitzgerald of things to come (Gatsby failing to reach his dream).

    Obviously make 1 main strong point, and just add in the 'weaker' alternative idea with ''This symbol might also be considered as a representation of.....''. Make it explicit that you're considering different interpretations and you should get the mark. I think many symbols have possible different interpretations to them.
    So it's not imperative that you relate an interpretation to a specific group (e.g. feminism, contempary etc)

    And a sidenote, when using quotes in your essays is it necessary to specify the chapter, line...?

    Thanks
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    I think we all need a pep talk or whatever on Sunday. Personally, I nominate the firstnotlastsamurai ;D

    (Original post by thefirstnotlastsamurai)
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    If you were to look at destination within texts is that the message of the texts and the journeys within the texts?

    Also in section B, if you were to do a novel and two poets could you just do one poem for each poet or would you need to do a couple for each?
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    (Original post by dyhtps)
    If you were to look at destination within texts is that the message of the texts and the journeys within the texts?

    Also in section B, if you were to do a novel and two poets could you just do one poem for each poet or would you need to do a couple for each?
    Google tells me
    -Destination (finish): the place designated as the end (as of a race or journey); "a crowd assembled at the finish"; "he was nearly exhausted as their destination came into view"
    -The ultimate goal for which something is done
    I See the destination of a novel to be what the author wants the reader to take away from the text (eg. morals), what he wants to achieve with the story (catharsis or awareness) and to some extent the ending (this is why people think that it won't come up, as endings were in June. We've seen throughout this thread how subjective 'destination' can be.

    In section B I've been told do to half of it based on a novel (the kite runner in my case), the other half on poems. The poems section made up of four poems, two from each author (Rossetti and Browning)
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    (Original post by OneInSolidarity)
    I See the destination of a novel to be what the author wants the reader to take away from the text (eg. morals), what he wants to achieve with the story (catharsis or awareness) and to some extent the ending (this is why people think that it won't come up, as endings were in June. We've seen throughout this thread how subjective 'destination' can be.

    In section B I've been told do to half of it based on a novel (the kite runner in my case), the other half on poems. The poems section made up of four poems, two from each author (Rossetti and Browning)
    Brilliant, thanks!

    I think Browning is going to be fairly easy if Destinations comes up: Pied Piper more or less tells you in it's last line the fundamental moral
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    Another question

    What is the difference in place and setting?

    For place I look at as it creating moral standards, local customs, social status etc. For setting is it more looking at the surroundings of particular events? Such as in kite runner when Hassan gets raped and it's in the dark alley. Is that the sort of thing setting means?
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    does anyone know what the rosetti poems/enduring love section a questions were last year (ie june 2010)??
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    (Original post by dyhtps)
    Brilliant, thanks!

    I think Browning is going to be fairly easy if Destinations comes up: Pied Piper more or less tells you in it's last line the fundamental moral
    I hate the Pied Piper :P! I haven't even looked at it. I hope to use The Patriot and Porphyria's Lover.
 
 
 
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