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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    Does anyone's revision guide contain info on this because mine doesn't :
    Attachment 226869


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    Electronic components are getting smaller

    1. Over the last 50 years or so, electronic components have gotten smaller- it's known as miniaturisation.
    2. This has both benefits and drawbacks for makers of electronics, and for the people who use them.
      Maker
      Benefits: Smaller devices use less raw materials. Most customers like smaller devices.
      Drawbacks: It can be more complex to produce small devices, and more expensive.

      Users
      Benefits: More portable electronic devices available. More powerful and feature-filled devices produced.
      Drawbacks: Smaller devices can be more expensive. They're easier to lose down the back of the sofa.
    3. Computers have become smaller, cheaper and more powerful too. As more people have access to more computing power (e.g. computers and phones) society needs to decide how this should, or should not, be allowed to be used.
      For example, society needs to think about controlling hacking, privacy and access to personal data.



    Copied this from my CGP revision guide.
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    Are the equations all still included on the paper?

    Because i can't find (m1 x u1) + (m2 x u2) = (m1+m2) x v anywhere?


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    (Original post by benwalters1996)
    Are the equations all still included on the paper?

    Because i can't find (m1 x u1) + (m2 x u2) = (m1+m2) x v anywhere?


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    I don't think all of them are in it?
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    Can someone help me understand magnetic fields and motors please? Or link a decent website?

    We weren't taught it and my revision book isn't that explanatory.


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    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1371310677.944729.jpg
Views: 78
Size:  191.1 KB guys....if electrons travel - to + why is the arrow drawn from + to -?


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    (Original post by benwalters1996)
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1371310677.944729.jpg
Views: 78
Size:  191.1 KB guys....if electrons travel - to + why is the arrow drawn from + to -?


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    I think it's cause scientists first thought they travelled from + to -, so even when they discovered it was actually - to + they were like ain't nobady gat time fo' dat, and so they just write + to - for the sake of simplicity.
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    (Original post by Red Fox)
    Electronic components are getting smaller

    1. Over the last 50 years or so, electronic components have gotten smaller- it's known as miniaturisation.
    2. This has both benefits and drawbacks for makers of electronics, and for the people who use them.
      Maker
      Benefits: Smaller devices use less raw materials. Most customers like smaller devices.
      Drawbacks: It can be more complex to produce small devices, and more expensive.

      Users
      Benefits: More portable electronic devices available. More powerful and feature-filled devices produced.
      Drawbacks: Smaller devices can be more expensive. They're easier to lose down the back of the sofa.
    3. Computers have become smaller, cheaper and more powerful too. As more people have access to more computing power (e.g. computers and phones) society needs to decide how this should, or should not, be allowed to be used.
      For example, society needs to think about controlling hacking, privacy and access to personal data.



    Copied this from my CGP revision guide.
    Thanks


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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    Thanks


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    I really hate P6, revising it is the most boring thing ever.
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    (Original post by Red Fox)
    I really hate P6, revising it is the most boring thing ever.
    Transformers, rectification and capacitors are the hardest topics in all three sciences i find :/


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    (Original post by Red Fox)
    I really hate P6, revising it is the most boring thing ever.
    Preach it, it feels like every new page contradicts what I had just spend hours trying to learn :mad:
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    I'm going to leave 2 days free just to revise P6 - from just skimming through yesterday I didn't really understand anything..


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    (Original post by Red Fox)
    I really hate P6, revising it is the most boring thing ever.
    Yes, I'm finding P6 very boring and dull, and I feel I'm actually learning new things rather than just revising them when I go through this module... :facepalm:

    I can't wait till this exam is over, hopefully physics A level doesn't have anything as boring as this!


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    (Original post by DeadUnicorn)
    Preach it, it feels like every new page contradicts what I had just spend hours trying to learn :mad:
    Same here- I keep managing to confuse different features of generators and motors up


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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    Yes, I'm finding P6 very boring and dull, and I feel I'm actually learning new things rather than just revising them when I go through this module... :facepalm:

    I can't wait till this exam is over, hopefully physics A level doesn't have anything as boring as this!


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    Haha same. I don't think I was even taught about potential dividers or diodes. My OCR AS Physics revision guide has 16 pages on electricity and electronics so I don't think I'm getting away from it any time soon.
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    Can anyone explain why the magnetic field goes from N to S?
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    (Original post by Red Fox)
    Can anyone explain why the magnetic field goes from N to S?
    I thought it was just convention that they do this


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    Is anyone using old spec past papers?
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    (Original post by Red Fox)
    Haha same. I don't think I was even taught about potential dividers or diodes. My OCR AS Physics revision guide has 16 pages on electricity and electronics so I don't think I'm getting away from it any time soon.
    Lol, well, for bridge circuits (a difficult topic which took me a while to understand it), our teacher just gave us a sheet with info about them on it and then expected us to learn it in class...

    That's unlucky but maybe, it won't be as bad


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    (Original post by Daniel97g)
    Is anyone using old spec past papers?
    I am

    I did the jan 2009 paper today and some of the questions in there were in the specimen paper :L


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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    I am

    I did the jan 2009 paper today and some of the questions in there were in the specimen paper :L


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    Do you find the past papers really help your learning or are you just doing it to test yourself?
 
 
 
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