What career would suit me? Generally struggling with this. Watch

Hellz_Bellz!
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#221
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#221
(Original post by Biblio)
dont do it, my brother is on JSA after he finished his A levels he just plays xbox now
Didn't she just say she isn't going on JSA? You've made no decent contributions to this thread.
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Biblio
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#222
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#222
(Original post by Hellz_Bellz!)
Didn't she just say she isn't going on JSA? You've made no decent contributions to this thread.
ok sorry whatever bye
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Tyrion_Lannister
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#223
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(Original post by desdemonata)
You're really missing my point here. I said that it's not about making your boyfriend provide for you like he doesn't want to, it's the fact that you're willing to just rely on him (bad idea) and want a dream job with unrealistic criteria. My boyfriend also wants to work part-time in a well-paid profession, but in no way am I going to be so naive so as to plan my career around that and account for his earnings to validate my not wanting to work full time. And also... what if you two break up? What will you do then? What if your next boyfriend doesn't expect to put in any more financially than you, and expects you to work full-time? What if you stay single for a few years? You'll have set your life up for a horrific fall, because you'll find it damned hard to suddenly start supporting yourself and get work when it's already so competitive.

The thing is also, to get such a well-paid part-time job, you'd need to be damned good at whatever you do and to have already shown it through a lot of work experience. To ever have a chance of being in such high-demand as to be paid double the hourly rate for a part time job, you'd need to work full-time first and slog away until you can get there. You can't just get a part-time grad job that pays so well.
I don't plan on us breaking up neither does he We live together

I agree it's hard to get a well paid part time job
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Biblio
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(Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
I don't plan on us breaking up neither does he We live together

I agree it's hard to get a well paid part time job
What degree did you at university
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Tyrion_Lannister
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#225
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#225
(Original post by Biblio)
What degree did you at university
I do History of art..
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FlavaFavourFruit
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(Original post by Hanvyj)
Hmm, have you ever heard of 'managing expectations'?

You seem to want it all. Decent wage, decent job that isn't hard or boring and lots of free time.

It's just not very realistic. 20k is a pretty good wage for full time early on in a career, and unless you get on a grad scheme you would expect to be paid less than that.

But I noticed you are saying you don't care about the money so much. But isn't that kind of the reason you're getting a job? It's pretty difficult to support yourself on 15k a year. I'd be hesitant to put all your earning potential on a partner for two reasons:

1) It will breed resentment. I've worked full time, 9-5 + overtime for about 4 years now. It's pretty tough dragging yourself out of bed every day. There are so many other things I'd love to be doing that I'm too tired when I get home at seven o'clock. I've got books to write, that I'm reasonably good at. I've got cars to fix and a house to decorate a whole host of other things that I love doing with my spare time.

But I can't, because I need to pay for food, and energy and petrol for the car and our mortgage.

Don't get me wrong, I actually really like my job. It's what you listed, flexible, well paid. Analytical (vs creative because I like analytical). It's pretty much my dream job. But it's still really bloody hard to spend 40 hours or more doing it!

When my wife was working 8 hours a week, I found it hard. However much stuff you do around the house... you aren't really going to be dong it full time (the 'things' you wanted to do are a lot to do with yourself rather than your partner too) and it's tough working so hard so someone else gets all the nice things with none of the work. However much you love them, it introduces inequality, and that breeds resentment.

2) It's not a good idea for you to 'put all your eggs in one basket'. Your boyfriend might get fired. He might break a leg. He might get made redundant. What would you do then? A second income is invaluable for security to keep paying the rent.

What if your boyfriend leaves you? I know it doesn't seem likely now but even people who are married get divorced. In 20 years time do you want to start from rung 1 on a sensible career or already have a decent wage and experience. If you plan your life around your boyfriends income... you're taking a risk.

3) Money. Have you ever supported yourself? You never have enough money, trust me. As you get older your expenditure increases. You get mortgages, cars, kids, you live in nicer neighborhoods and buy nicer food.

Paying for it is hard. I earn a decent wage and we still struggle some months (more than when we were students). A second income is a god-send.

Do you ever want to buy a house? If so, your deposit is going to take 20 years to save up, or 2 if you have a decent second wage.



Personally, I think it's pretty selfish to want to work part time and expect someone else to provide for you. If you have to because you are working on building your own business or look after kids or just can't find a job - fine. But to just expect someone else to support your 'activities' just doesn't seem right to me. I'd hate it.
Absolutely agree. The future is the future and it's not certain, anything can happen.
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desdemonata
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#227
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#227
(Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
I don't plan on us breaking up neither does he We live together

I agree it's hard to get a well paid part time job
Tyrion, do you even realise how naive that is.

My sister was with her boyfriend for 4 years and they lived together for 3 years during that time. They didn't plan on breaking up either, but they did, and now he lives in Australia. Nobody ever plans on breaking up in a serious relationship, but it's incredibly naive to think that in a year, two years, 5 years time things can't change. Seriously, did you actually just say that...

But you don't want just that, you want your dream job. And you can afford to be picky because you're being dependent on someone else. As I said, the issue people are taking here is that you're being dependent on someone else and yet trying to dress it up as having "different priorities". Most people would call this "not wanting to grow up".
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Biblio
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(Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
I do History of art..
ok, maybe you could look at being a curatour at an muesem of art#
musems have management role dat yhou can maybe get in to perhaps maybe idk

you cant start wokring in the caf if you want making coffee i done that once not in musem in asda
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awkwardchild
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#229
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#229
How about a wedding planner?
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Moosferatu
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#230
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#230
(Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
It isn't lazy to not be career focused. Why are you not getting that?

But it is nothing to do with you. So basically your point is "Because I have to do something unpleasant, you have to too!"..
That's pretty much the motto of the human experience.
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River85
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#231
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(Original post by tehforum)
So you get DSA?
I think you mean ESA (Employment and Support Allowance) or perhaps DLA (Disability Living Allowance)? DLA is not a work-related benefit.

DSA is Disabled Students Allowance, a non-repayable grant for students in higher education.

I believe this is where the confusion with Job Seekers Allowance began.

(Original post by Biblio)
no, get a supermarket job and job search whilst you work there dont be a scrounger
Not that the OP receives JSA (see above, I think you read DSA as JSA), but there isn't anything wrong with claiming Job Seekers Allowance if looking for a job, especially having made National Insurance contributions. If you pay into the system why not receive something from it?

(Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
That's why he's going to work full time and I'm not.
There's nothing wrong with you wanting to work part-time only, though it may be difficult supporting yourself and building a career early on (part-time or flexible working is more realistic later down the line). People on this thread seem to have the mistaken belief that part-time work is only for parents when this isn't the case. The ignorance and lack of understanding that some people, even young people, can have long-term limiting illness' is disheartening. That said, the way you phrased your post does make you sound like you want the best of both worlds with as little effort as possible, so people will make judgements.

I can't criticise. I just took a 20 hour a week contract instead of a 37 hour a week contract myself. This is because I have about 20 hours of voluntary work a week, important for getting a job in the charity sector, and a Zero Hours contract (which I'd like to continue balancing with the other job if possible). But even without the voluntary work I am concerned that a 37 hour week, especially in the role I've been offered, will be too much for my health.

But my concerns would be, and sorry for putting this thought into you head, that you may not always have a boyfriend to bump up the household income. Even if you do, establishing a career in incredibly competitive areas can be tough. You will be competing against people who can work full time and pay will not be good. You need to keep this in mind. But at least you've revised the 20k figure to 15k. 20k, for a three day working week, was never particularly realistic.

Now onto my suggestion, how would you feel about working as an Occupational Therapist? It can be a very creative profession and is very versatile. Depending on your own interests and abilities, and where you want to work, you may find yourself using art therapy/arts and crafts in sessions.

I just thought of this as you mentioned you would like a people focused role. I have no idea how you feel about working with people who have mental health problems or other health conditions/disabilities. Also it will require another degree, which can be quite intensive (classroom learning, self study and workplace placements), so might not be suitable.
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awkwardchild
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#232
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(Original post by desdemonata)
The thing is, your plan is basically relying on someone else for the things you don't want to do. What are you going to do if you aren't with someone who works full time? Your set of priorities only works in one situation, you shouldn't plan for your life to be that way, because then if you end up single you'll be screwed.

Also relying on someone else your whole life to do the ****ty stuff (working full time, doing a job they don't like) is basically never growing up and being a kid. It's not about being academic at all, it's about being a grown up. Grown ups work, earn their own money, pay their own bills, do things they don't want to do because they need to. They don't rely on someone else to make their life easy.

And I'm sorry, but you DO NOT need to have more of your week dedicated to free time than work to be able to look after a house, do the shopping and meet people. The weekend is more than enough. The only time you could feasibly argue you need plenty of free time is if you have very young children.
Darn, ran out of reps! Wish I could rep you for this!
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River85
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#233
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(Original post by Biblio)
ok, maybe you could look at being a curatour at an muesem of art#
musems have management role dat yhou can maybe get in to perhaps maybe idk
That will likely require a PhD, or at the very least a Masters degree, with a substantial commitment to museum work through voluntary experience. It isn't really people facing, at least not in large museums, where curators will spend their times doing research and other things rather than answering queries from the public and helping with exhibitions.

There are some entry level jobs which may be suitable working with events and exhibitions, and direct contact with the public, but not for 15k part-time. Visitor Assistant for example. Significant voluntary experience may be needed.
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Machop
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#234
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(Original post by Occams Chainsaw)
I think it's more fun to be a dreamer. I have always wanted to be an astronaut. I know the odds are slim to none but I'm going to go for it. One day, the harsh reality will probably hit me in that I don't have a chance but I'd rather be (overly) ambitious and risk failure and disappointment than live life assuming it's not possible or it's not worth the risk.

The fact is, it's only people like that who actually get in to those jobs. The people who are in 'the real world' mindset - no doubt the stereotype you might see in economics - will live perfectly average lives most of the time.

Sure, not every person aspiring to reach space will get there but they have a better chance than the guy who laughed at everybody who tried.
I think the OP is the exact opposite of ambitious or a dreamer, just naive.
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User990473
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(Original post by Machop)
I think the OP is the exact opposite of ambitious or a dreamer, just naive.
:mmm:
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pane123
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#236
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(Original post by desdemonata)
The thing is, your plan is basically relying on someone else for the things you don't want to do. What are you going to do if you aren't with someone who works full time? Your set of priorities only works in one situation, you shouldn't plan for your life to be that way, because then if you end up single you'll be screwed.

Also relying on someone else your whole life to do the ****ty stuff (working full time, doing a job they don't like) is basically never growing up and being a kid. It's not about being academic at all, it's about being a grown up. Grown ups work, earn their own money, pay their own bills, do things they don't want to do because they need to. They don't rely on someone else to make their life easy.

And I'm sorry, but you DO NOT need to have more of your week dedicated to free time than work to be able to look after a house, do the shopping and meet people. The weekend is more than enough. The only time you could feasibly argue you need plenty of free time is if you have very young children.
This is the best post I have read on TSR - well done. I must have given you rep recently so cannot do so again, but you deserve lots.

OP, the job you describe probably does not exist, other than in 12 year olds' imaginations.
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interact
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#237
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#237
Do whatever makes you happy and tell your boyfriend to marry you.
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natninja
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#238
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#238
Become a stock photo model? (and do your own makeup - you could be the next 'woman laughing with salad' XD)
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User990473
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#239
(Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
I don't expect him to do a job he's not interested in though? My boyfriend wants to work full time and wants to be a lawyer, it's not like I've said he has to? I don't get why people are saying I'm being unfair to him?

I can understand your point about it only works if I'm in a relationship
Don't you think you could be seen as mooching off of him a little bit and how that could be annoying for him later on in the relationship when he feels like he's doing most of the leg work?
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Tyrion_Lannister
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#240
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(Original post by Occams Chainsaw)
Don't you think you could be seen as mooching off of him a little bit and how that could be annoying for him later on in the relationship when he feels like he's doing most of the leg work?
He's fine with it though
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