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Should teachers be banned from striking? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Should teachers be banned from striking?
    Yes
    65
    28.02%
    No
    167
    71.98%

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    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    :confused::confused:

    I do not think you will find any employer that pays striking workers
    Nor do I, but I expect the government would be the last of employers to consider it.
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    (Original post by All-rounder)
    everyone is lashing out against the teachers for striking, saying they're greedy or should only do it in a profession where it wont affect people.
    Well, the reason they do it is because it affects people, that's how they get their demands heard. If it made no difference whether or not they were striking, then they'd get nowhere.
    As you should all know, ALL teachers are required to be part of a union, NUT is an example of just one. When their union decides they are going to strike, BY LAW, the teachers in that union have to as well whether they want to or not. It's not a matter of greed or ignorance, most teachers have to take marking home so that they can finish it for the next day, not to mention planning lessons for upcoming exams which are constantly getting harder and then carry out those lessons whilst the pupils complain there's too much. They end up having to do more work than most professions and strikes allow them to get fairer pay/pensions for the work they do.
    Hi,

    Can Jammy and I ask (again) what you're on about in bold? Its just not not true...

    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Ummm, no they don't. By law, if it affects them, they must be included in the ballot to decide whether to strike or not, but there is no obligation for them to actually go on strike. If they were obliged to I would be surprised if ANY school was left open today since the majority of staff would have been sat at home.


    What's getting harder? The exams, or the planning? Neither are. Not to mention, that for the most part the same plans can be used from one year to the next with minor alterations, unless the syllabus is reworked.


    Define "fairer" please.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Hi,

    Can Jammy and I ask (again) what you're on about in bold? Its just not not true...
    I think by the "they have to be part of a union" thing they're probably just referring to the fact that it would be incredibly foolish not to be in a union as you would be completely unprotected if anything went wrong.

    You're completely correct with the strike bit of course, the majority of the relevant teachers in my school chose not to strike on both occasions this year.

    Xxx

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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    I think by the "they have to be part of a union" thing they're probably just referring to the fact that it would be incredibly foolish not to be in a union as you would be completely unprotected if anything went wrong.

    You're completely correct with the strike bit of course, the majority of the relevant teachers in my school chose not to strike on both occasions this year.

    Xxx

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    Putting it in caps makes it sound more than that.

    You wouldn't be unprotected, just wouldn't get union representation.
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    (Original post by A Mysterious Lord)
    I think it's got more to do with the fact that teachers can seemingly strike regardless of the effects on a child's education, but woe betide any parents taking their children out of school for a day or two. Horrendous double standards.
    Do you honestly think it was the teachers who decided that parents would get fined for taking their children out of school?! Funny! Google Mr Gove.
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    (Original post by A Mysterious Lord)
    I think it's got more to do with the fact that teachers can seemingly strike regardless of the effects on a child's education, but woe betide any parents taking their children out of school for a day or two. Horrendous double standards.
    Do you actually think that a day out is detrimental?
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Do you actually think that a day out is detrimental?
    Not at all, but that's the argument they throw around when a child takes time off.
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    A couple last week were prosecuted for taking their children on holiday during school-time.

    Teachers should face consequences IMO.
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    You can't force action unless your protest actually causes some harm. One day off school won't affect a student's learning, but a nation wide strike might affect the government enough to sit up and pay attention.
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    (Original post by lerjj)
    You can't force action unless your protest actually causes some harm. One day off school won't affect a student's learning, but a nation wide strike might affect the government enough to sit up and pay attention.
    How?
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    How?
    In the same way strikes usually do? In this case there's the added factor that people will get up in arms about teachers neglecting their duty and that'll put pressure on the government to listen to them.

    My point I was trying to make is: striking won't have an impact unless it disrupts something. Banning professions from striking because it's disruptive is therefore completely missing the point.
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    (Original post by lerjj)
    In the same way strikes usually do? In this case there's the added factor that people will get up in arms about teachers neglecting their duty and that'll put pressure on the government to listen to them.

    My point I was trying to make is: striking won't have an impact unless it disrupts something. Banning professions from striking because it's disruptive is therefore completely missing the point.
    Teachers need to learn to strike better, as it is nobody in their right mind should be complaining much, it's a mild inconvenience to working parents but has absolutely 0 impact on learning as they already waste that much time it's easy to catch up.
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    ITT: People who don't understand the purpose of strikes or the labour movement complaining that strikes make some people's lives inconvenient
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Teachers need to learn to strike better, as it is nobody in their right mind should be complaining much, it's a mild inconvenience to working parents but has absolutely 0 impact on learning as they already waste that much time it's easy to catch up.
    True, but the confusion re thisis actually helpful, as it gives the strike something of a sharper edge, even when it's not justified.
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    (Original post by lerjj)
    True, but the confusion re thisis actually helpful, as it gives the strike something of a sharper edge, even when it's not justified.
    If I were a parent regularly being affected by these strikes that have little hope of going anywhere I would sooner be calling for a change in the system or the outright banning of the strikes before calling for the government to cave to their demands.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    If I were a parent regularly being affected by these strikes that have little hope of going anywhere I would sooner be calling for a change in the system or the outright banning of the strikes before calling for the government to cave to their demands.
    Why? If I agreed with the demands (which normally I would I guess) then I don't see why I'd call for no striking. Striking actually gives some accountability.
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    (Original post by lerjj)
    Why? If I agreed with the demands (which normally I would I guess) then I don't see why I'd call for no striking. Striking actually gives some accountability.
    But why is it that they have been striking recently?
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    (Original post by lerjj)
    Why? If I agreed with the demands (which normally I would I guess) then I don't see why I'd call for no striking. Striking actually gives some accountability.
    Thats the if though isn't it? I don't think the majority of people do agree though. Clearly even those in the profession are divided, hardly like there was anywhere near full turn out of the teachers and int he civil service those who walked out were in the minority.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    But why is it that they have been striking recently?
    Not sure about the recent ones. I know that they were put on a pay freeze for quite a while while inflation kept up. They were striking about that reasonably recently, but the very latest ones... I have no idea. Maybe their salaries are still frozen? Maybe it's just general whining, no knows?
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    (Original post by lerjj)
    Not sure about the recent ones. I know that they were put on a pay freeze for quite a while while inflation kept up. They were striking about that reasonably recently, but the very latest ones... I have no idea. Maybe their salaries are still frozen? Maybe it's just general whining, no knows?
    They're striking over their pension plan, and their minimal rises, and that instead of being ensured a pay rise for the first x years they actually have to do their job properly. And while their pay was frozen and inflation was still happening, their base rate is still higher than the national median, and the top of the main scale outside of London is still 5k higher than the mean. They cry because their not actually bad pay isn't going up.
 
 
 
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