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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    I found A-Levels way harder then degree and I just did a set recently. Degree stuff is a walk in the park, Ive got the UCL pharmacy stuff infront of me. Doesn't seem hard at all, because you grasp the concepts in A-level, makes learning downhill!

    The system isn't to be blamed as you said its the parents, personally you need to make them more accountable.
    Thats because you're doing pharmacy, try a medicine/dentistry degree
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    (Original post by a10)
    I'm not sure about maths but i don't think you have professional institutions accrediting the courses. With engineering for example, we have professional institutions which accredit the courses under the UK engineering council this ensures that several universities are teaching core modules which MUST be done at every university in order for that course to be accredited as a mark of quality (also one of the reasons why in things like engineering reputation of the university doesn't really mean anything, accreditation has a greater bearing).

    Also it was the individuals choice to study at any of those universities knowing that the course is very theoretical, so if they end up getting a 2.2 that shouldn't be used an excuse and shouldn't make you entitled to anything like OP put it in his original post. Sure the course may have been harder in some aspects but again it doesn't mean people at the so called "lower" universities aren't competent enough in the subject.
    Most subjects aren't accredited though (an even engineering varies across degrees, altohugh I have to take other peoples word for that).

    I never said anything about how theorectical the course is, maths at manchester i just as theoretical as maths at Oxford, it's just they do less stuff in less depth and the questions are significantly less difficult. Someone with a mid-high 2.2 at Oxford (55%+) will be more competent in the subject than someone who gets a 2.1 at manchester.
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    (Original post by alevelzzz)
    Thats because you're doing pharmacy, try a medicine/dentistry degree
    Had a place for Medicine at the University of Buckingham, the name just put me off completely. I applied in Jan because that was the Pharmacy deadline.
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    (Original post by james22)
    Most subjects aren't accredited though (an even engineering varies across degrees, altohugh I have to take other peoples word for that).
    I study engineering myself, and im pretty sure all accredited universities teach very very similar content the only difference being each university may excel in one specific area of engineering compared to the other and this may be squeezed in as a little extra on top of the core modules other than that we all study pretty much the same content, otherwise if this wasn't the case employers wouldn't bother specifying that the degree should be accredited (which they do because they know this..).

    As to what you said about maths, going more in depth in topics makes the course more theoretical.
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    (Original post by a10)
    I study engineering myself, and im pretty sure all accredited universities teach very very similar content the only difference being each university may excel in one specific area of engineering compared to the other and this may be squeezed in as a little extra on top of the core modules other than that we all study pretty much the same content, otherwise if this wasn't the case employers wouldn't bother specifying that the degree should be accredited (which they do because they know this..).

    As to what you said about maths, going more in depth in topics makes the course more theoretical.
    I won't even try to argue with you on engineering as I know very little about it, but if by more theoretical you just mean going into more depth then that's fine, but I assumed you meant it in a theoretical vs practical sense.
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    (Original post by james22)
    I won't even try to argue with you on engineering as I know very little about it, but if by more theoretical you just mean going into more depth then that's fine, but I assumed you meant it in a theoretical vs practical sense.
    Comp sci has that problem too.

    Had guys from Edinburgh, St Andrews transfer to my uni Aberdeen because there were not enough practical units in the syllabuses.
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    (Original post by juiceboxy)
    I'm looking through graduate roles and a bunch of them require a 2.1 and wont even let you apply without one. What makes this so bad is that they often don't specify what you need a 2.1 in, just any degree.

    I got a 2.2 in MORSE at Warwick. I looked at a graduate role for Fujitsu- 2.1 degree and 240 UCAS points from 3 A-Levels. I have 400 UCAS points from 3 A-Levels.

    Why is the system so broken? I'm not going to pretend like I performed well at Uni, but don't mock me with these ridiculously low A-Level requirements and then say 2.1 in ANYTHING.
    Have you tried emailing the HR department? Sometimes a job may not get many good candidates or any candidates at all, if you show interest they may accept your application. I had a colleague on my course who graduated with a 2.2, he emailed HR of a grad scheme, got his application in, interview and now a job, a year later no one cares about his 2.2
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    (Original post by Brit_Miller)
    Your generalisations make me cringe every time. Kids aren't dumb at 17/18 if they haven't gotten 3 A*s, there's so many factors. The amount of incredibly bright kids from GCSE didn't do as well due to family, socialising, working etc and who the hell are you to generalise a whole group of people anyway? Life doesn't stop after getting A-Levels, if you can't perform at university you clearly don't excel at the course you applied for and should have no complaints.
    (Original post by donutaud15)
    A lot of people in my class had very good A levels. What a lot of people don't seem to understand is sometimes people choose to go to a certain uni despite its rankings because they simply just want to. Not because they're too dumb or whatever. It's a stupid mentality and it's high time people get over their superiority complex. So bloody what if they have 400 UCAS points? If they have a 2.2 it still means **** all, unless they can prove mitigating circumstances to potential employers. Hell in ten years A levels wouldn't even matter when applying for a job.
    I think Dalek's case has some merit, despite himself. Qualifications are generally indicative of, while not linearly determined by, some dimensions of intelligence. Everything else being equal, achieving higher than lower marks is likely - although not necessarily - indicative of higher than lower ability in the relevant sense. If exams capture any intelligence or otherwise ability, this seems to hold. In reality of course, people have variant circumstances, and exams are highly imperfect representations of the totality of ones capabilities. That said, I doubt this confounds the statistical regularity of intelligence correlating with standards of qualification, and the composition of universities reflecting that fact. Moreover, it seems to follow from the relative positive correlation between university selectivity and resources (London Met has an endowment of £1.32m; Cambridge of £4.9bn), that any discrepancy of ability to begin with is only aggravated.

    All that said, this is only a middling trend, qualifications are very imperfect measures of just about anything, the vast majority of jobs require an unexceptional intelligence, and the vast majority of jobs value traits besides intelligence. It is also probably worth noting that wealth is the principal determinant of educational opportunity, not intelligence. Physical and mental health, the family and community of ones upbringing, the colour of ones skin, and various other circumstantial factors, are also probably as or more important than intelligence.
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    Tbh i've seen quite a few graduate STEM jobs with a 2.2 minimum requirement.

    Although if you're going up against a first class Masters Degree master race applicant you're not going to fare well with a 2.2 tbh.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Had a place for Medicine at the University of Buckingham, the name just put me off completely. I applied in Jan because that was the Pharmacy deadline.
    Buckingham is a private school, doesnt even count rofl
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    (Original post by Misovlogos)
    ...
    I take exception to Dalek generalising everyone with lower grades are dumber. It's pretty much stating the bleedin' obvious that clever kids generally get better grades.
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    Same accreditation as you would from anyother medical school in the UK still MBBS and the GMC love them. Blame society not me for them being so good.
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    Back to Alevels if they were so easy your little brother wouldn't constantly retaking since 2010 and still get C and D. He can only blame the letts revision guides to a certain extent.
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    (Original post by Brit_Miller)
    I take exception to Dalek generalising everyone with lower grades are dumber. It's pretty much stating the bleedin' obvious that clever kids generally get better grades.
    That's reasonable, several people seemed to think otherwise on this thread, however.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    I have a mate , law student , AAAAAA.

    He is 0/20 atm with grad schemes.

    Gets to the final round and is rejected.

    You need luck.
    Your obviously not a very good friend, earlier i didn't have time to write this. But anyway, as a friend you should of advised him what his "win condition" was and you could have explained to him the variables. Everytime I go for an interview, I at least consult a handful of people on their thoughts and opinions and practice sales pitches and presentations, talk about logical ideas and giving examples of situations. Even with the psychometric testing, I consult someone that is particularly good at it. Why didn't you explain to him the mechanics and resource management, your a nasty human being not to do so. Do you think they give out an outline of a day for fun. It gives you ample of opportunity to strategise. I haven't been to grad scheme interviews for a while, but you should have done so considering the number you been on. Try to start of the "theme", the companies objectives, read the annual business statement and all the corporate rubbish, so you can cite it like religion. You don't ever want to be in a situation of catch up and learn to eliminate others around you - alphamale. I have a copy of a psychometric test I did at Virgin (i will show you if you want) and even at Director level they make people do this rubbish. Even then, I knew beforehand what words to look for and a pattern and sequence of words to go for to show im what they are looking for. Taking a friend to the pub and sorting out their isn't a solution, your ruining his life and chances to succeed.

    He sounds anti social talk to him like you would a dog.... start off with this, really simple, but it works. On thickle HR people they never see through it.

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirroring_(psychology)
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Not at all I spent most my days at school getting kicked out,lol. It shows im willing to use physical intervention to get what i want. Not scared of conflict or a bit of violence. Getting a good A-Level IT grade will get you on a decent A-Level scheme with an IT company and a reasonable salary with a degree in 5 years in computer science guaranteed.
    A-Level IT doesn't get anybody anywhere.
    I was actively discouraged from taking A-Level IT by my GCSE IT teachers with the suggestion that I take "something more useful".
    I don't think it needs mentioning that they were right.
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    (Original post by mikebrown1)
    Maths Operational Research Statistics and Economics
    that sounds so ****ing boring.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by CJKay)
    A-Level IT doesn't get anybody anywhere.
    I was actively discouraged from taking A-Level IT by my GCSE IT teachers with the suggestion that I take "something more useful".
    I don't think it needs mentioning that they were right.
    Imagine if u didn't listen to them Capgemmi school leaver £16-20k, you get a degree and a guaranteed job with there A-level requirement. Also remember teachers are influencers, examiners are decision makers. A teachers opinion is not worth the paper its written on, its clearly subjective and holds 0 weight in the real world. Also your the decision maker, its your future, you should your teachers accountable. People that teach in schools are often failures themselves, takes very little do so. The most successful and academic go into the city to make moolah. Listening to inexperienced individuals is the worst thing anyone can do.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Imagine if u didn't listen to them Capgemmi school leaver £16-20k, you get a degree and a guaranteed job with there A-level requirement. Also remember teachers are influencers, examiners are decision makers. A teachers opinion is not worth the paper its written on, its clearly subjective and holds 0 weight in the real world. Also your the decision maker, its your future, you should your teachers accountable. People that teach in schools are often failures themselves, takes very little do so. The most successful and academic go into the city to make moolah. Listening to inexperienced individuals is the worst thing anyone can do.
    I have no idea what you just said.
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    (Original post by CJKay)
    I have no idea what you just said.
    I was saying if you listen to a school teachers advice then you must be an idiot. It holds no weight in society, they are non decision makers, so they are obsolete.
 
 
 
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