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    (Original post by amenahussein)
    Yes, sorry. Typo


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    Lol, f and p are nowhere near eachother on the keyboard and you did it twice in one sentence :P
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    I am not Charlie. I sympathize with those who had to die for him and their families, but not Charlie. I don't see why i would have to sympathize with somebody who mocks religious and political beliefs and has the nerve to preach freedom of expression in a country where you are not allowed to have any religious symbols in schools. Hypocrisy at its finest. Oh, I don't agree with the attack either. The fact that people say "je suis charlie" annoys me because personally i think those who died deserve more recognition. By saying "je suis charlie" I would be encouraging a satirical cartoonist who mocks peoples beliefs and wasn't even in the country at the time of the attack, and I do not support that. Instead, "je suis those people who had to die for charlie".
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    (Original post by Gaiaphage)
    Lol, f and p are nowhere near eachother on the keyboard and you did it twice in one sentence :P
    My mistake.


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    (Original post by Asurat)
    I personally don't want Charlie Hebdo used as a vessel to represent my right to free speech so no, we are not all Charlie.
    Why ever not?
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    (Original post by HeavyTeddy)
    Charlie Hebdo was a disgusting human being, to put it mildly, but still I don't support the killing of another just because they offended you. My issue with this entire situation is that the media are purporting this as something intrinsic in islamic culture; that is, that Muslims think it's acceptable to respond in such a way to mockery. Honestly, I disagree with that idea completely. I think we should categorize and understand the behaviour and motivation of the gunmen as exactly what it is, a horrible, irrational but completely understandable psychological (and human) response. When you mock something that holds sentimental value to someone, they become angry, and sadly some of them become violent. That sentimentality isn't restricted to religion nevermind exclusively to Islam or Muslims.

    I dunno, just my 2p.
    "Understandable" implies an element of a natural, expected or forgivable sense to their actions. Their actions were anything but understandable, they were a grossly disproportionate response to the mere fact that a cartoon was drawn. They did not have the cartoon posted through their door, they would have had to go out of their way to track down these images, published by a very minor publisher.

    A sentimental reaction to the mere fact that an image has been drawn is wholly irrational. Any response - emotional, violent or otherwise - is not understandable in the least.
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    The Paris attacks have again added to the islamaphobia in the world. On behalf of real Muslims; We are not Charlie and we are not the terrorists who did the shootings, that is all.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    I understand that of course. I feel the same way when someone mocks the deaths of Indians in some religious or political context, but many people are into that kind of comedy so what can we do? :dontknow:
    I'd just ban something like that tbh, there is no need for it. I guess my perception of what people should be allowed to say or not differs from yours

    Whoevers the side getting mocked in these situations, hindus, sikhs, jews w/e, I'll speak up for them.
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    (Original post by elmothedancer)
    I think at the end of the day most people's opinion on the Charlie hebdo attack is summarized by the quote "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it" - Evelyn Beatrice Hall
    This. :cool:
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    (Original post by wellholathere)
    I am not Charlie. I sympathize with those who had to die for him and their families, but not Charlie. I don't see why i would have to sympathize with somebody who mocks religious and political beliefs and has the nerve to preach freedom of expression in a country where you are not allowed to have any religious symbols in schools. Hypocrisy at its finest. Oh, I don't agree with the attack either. The fact that people say "je suis charlie" annoys me because personally i think those who died deserve more recognition. By saying "je suis charlie" I would be encouraging a satirical cartoonist who mocks peoples beliefs and wasn't even in the country at the time of the attack, and I do not support that. Instead, "je suis those people who had to die for charlie".
    How is it remotely hypocritical to preach freedom of expression in a country that limits freedom of expression? It's absolutely *imperative* to do so.
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    (Original post by Lady Comstock)
    We are all Charlie in that we are all people who should have the right to draw or say things which subjectively offend others.
    I personally draw the line at insulting the religious dogma of about 5 million of your countrymen (correct me if I'm wrong). I will defend the right of others to attack things that are subjective without loss of life, but no further. Certainly not by affiliating myself with anything that is blatantly islamophobic, racist, or makes light of recent death.
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    (Original post by wellholathere)
    The Paris attacks have again added to the islamaphobia in the world. On behalf of real Muslims; We are not Charlie and we are not the terrorists who did the shootings, that is all.
    But, you are Charlie. All Europeans who value free speech and freedom of religion are Charlie. We are all a person (or organisation) who has the potential to be censored, by violence or otherwise, for our free expression. I am Charlie because I could be sitting in an office and end up being blow to bits because of something I have said or drawn.

    You are missing the point of the phrase.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    Freudian slip? I'm kidding of course.

    While I agree with you that those cartoons are unnecessarily offensive, I think violence should never be considered an acceptable response to things like this.

    I don't buy the newspapers or magazines, nor am I planning on buying them in the future. But I don't see why we need to ban satire and dark humour completely. AFAIK, we're allowed to joke about Hitler and Holocaust, even if some may find that kind of thing offensive.
    They say there is safety in numbers.


























    Tell that to 6million Jews.
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    (Original post by Asurat)
    I personally draw the line at insulting the religious dogma of about 5 million of your countrymen (correct me if I'm wrong). I will defend the right of others to attack things that are subjective without loss of life, but no further. Certainly not by affiliating myself with anything that is blatantly islamophobic, racist, or makes light of recent death.
    You wish to advocate censorship of expression because it hurts a large number of people's feelings? Absurd. Thank goodness you're not in power.
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    (Original post by wellholathere)
    I am not Charlie. I sympathize with those who had to die for him and their families, but not Charlie. I don't see why i would have to sympathize with somebody who mocks religious and political beliefs and has the nerve to preach freedom of expression in a country where you are not allowed to have any religious symbols in schools. Hypocrisy at its finest. Oh, I don't agree with the attack either. The fact that people say "je suis charlie" annoys me because personally i think those who died deserve more recognition. By saying "je suis charlie" I would be encouraging a satirical cartoonist who mocks peoples beliefs and wasn't even in the country at the time of the attack, and I do not support that. Instead, "je suis those people who had to die for charlie".
    + 1 to this.
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    How is it remotely hypocritical to preach freedom of expression in a country that limits freedom of expression? It's absolutely *imperative* to do so.
    It's hypocritical for France to be preaching freedom of expression when it comes to criticizing religious beliefs when they at the same time do not freedom of expression to allow religious representation.
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    (Original post by wellholathere)
    It's hypocritical for France to be preaching freedom of expression when it comes to criticizing religious beliefs when they at the same time do not freedom of expression to allow religious representation.
    That's a completely different statement and I appreciate (and agree with) the correction.
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    You wish to advocate censorship of expression because it hurts a large number of people's feelings? Absurd. Thank goodness you're not in power.
    Where did I say that I advocate censorship of expression? I'd very much like you to point it out.
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    (Original post by Asurat)
    Where did I say that I advocate censorship of expression? I'd very much like you to point it out.
    "I personally draw the line at insulting the religious dogma of about 5 million of your countrymen (correct me if I'm wrong)."

    Why draw such an arbitrary line?
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    The word islamophobia is thrown around a lot these days..
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    (Original post by Lady Comstock)
    But, you are Charlie. All Europeans who value free speech and freedom of religion are Charlie. We are all a person (or organisation) who has the potential to be censored, by violence or otherwise, for our free expression. I am Charlie because I could be sitting in an office and end up being blow to bits because of something I have said or drawn.

    You are missing the point of the phrase.
    No, i don't want the representation of Charlie. By doing this we're making a righteous human rights figure like mlk or something. I am a European citizen that values free speech and religion and expression, I just don't want to be backed by the representation of someone who mocks beliefs.
 
 
 
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