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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Yeah, I feel there should be a special kind of flag for this. People assume I'm a rich and dandy spoilt brat who's been spoon fed from the age of like 3. When in reality it was just a scholarship for sixth form.
    Schools often tell us in the reference if someone is on a scholarship and we do have a flag for those who come from areas of socio-economic hardship. When we judge context, however, we look at the quality of education that students have received, not whether or how much their parents had to pay for it.
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Yeah, I feel there should be a special kind of flag for this. People assume I'm a rich and dandy spoilt brat who's been spoon fed from the age of like 3. When in reality it was just a scholarship for sixth form.
    I was spoon fed at 1/2 and in the early age of 3.


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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    Oxbridge admissions is a political football which all sides feel is weighted against them.
    That bold statement is very true.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    The target was worked out with the Office for Fair Access (OFFA) in exchange for raising the tuition fee when our standard offer was A*AA. When our agreement with OFFA is renewed I expect that we will look at it again.

    The Sciences is pretty state heavy at Cambridge and it is in the Arts & Humanities where many successful private school applicants are to be found so I am not sure how much of a difference changing the offer level in Sciences will make to such calculations.

    Should admissions be purely meritocratic? Ideally yes but one person's idea of 'fair' very quickly clashes with someone else's. Should we purely use UMS without context or, if we do use context, how much should it be and how do we judge the difference in two candidates' educational contexts? Once you get into the details a clear picture fades away very fast. We do our best to make our processes as fair as we can but, as is clear from a cursory glance at the newspapers, Oxbridge admissions is a political football which all sides feel is weighted against them.
    Is it not also true that Cambridge's own research show that for the same UMS school background does not make much difference to degree success? As I understand it the variation at GCSE is much greater, possibly because many state comprehensive pupils do not take GCSEs that seriously and are more likely to be in classes with a lot of disruption and a wide ability range.In this case strong GCSEs are good predictors.
    https://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/offices/..._admission.pdf
    https://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/offices/...erformance.pdf
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Yeah, I feel there should be a special kind of flag for this. People assume I'm a rich and dandy spoilt brat who's been spoon fed from the age of like 3. When in reality it was just a scholarship for sixth form.
    those factors don't merit a flag really. My issue is that any positive discrimination present has a negative effect on people who wanted to take advantage of the best education available to them. It's in some ways akin to discriminating against Oxbridge graduates when applying for a job. Where do you draw the line between the academic success of the individual and their educational establishment
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    (Original post by Goods)
    those factors don't merit a flag really. My issue is that any positive discrimination present has a negative effect on people who wanted to take advantage of the best education available to them. It's in some ways akin to discriminating against Oxbridge graduates when applying for a job. Where do you draw the line between the academic success of the individual and their educational establishment
    Ah I see, I think the job is a hard one because you have to take so many different things into account. And each applicant will vary wildly in background and such... Can't really draw any lines anywhere without annoying some group.
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    (Original post by Colmans)
    Is it not also true that Cambridge's own research show that for the same UMS school background does not make much difference to degree success? As I understand it the variation at GCSE is much greater, possibly because many state comprehensive pupils do not take GCSEs that seriously and are more likely to be in classes with a lot of disruption and a wide ability range.In this case strong GCSEs are good predictors.
    https://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/offices/..._admission.pdf
    https://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/offices/...erformance.pdf
    Yes, it is true that school background makes little difference to success at Cambridge, unlike (iirc) the general picture in the UK where state school students tend to do a bit better than private school students with the same grades. This, hopefully, suuggests that we are doing ok on this measure.
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    (Original post by Goods)
    those factors don't merit a flag really. My issue is that any positive discrimination present has a negative effect on people who wanted to take advantage of the best education available to them. It's in some ways akin to discriminating against Oxbridge graduates when applying for a job. Where do you draw the line between the academic success of the individual and their educational establishment
    There is a big difference between judging context and positive discrimination - we do the former but very much not the latter. You raise an important question of where one draws the line between academic success of individual students and their educational establishment. It is not easy to do but we do our best to draw it in the right place.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    Yes, it is true that school background makes little difference to success at Cambridge, unlike (iirc) the general picture in the UK where state school students tend to do a bit better than private school students with the same grades. This, hopefully, suuggests that we are doing ok on this measure.
    I think this is an important indicator of the efficacy and fairness of Cambridge's selection process and I would like to see the university be a bit more vocal about this - in particular as a strong response to political and media footballing, and indeed the insinuation of many in this thread of bias against state/private/international/home/etc students.
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    (Original post by ClickItBack)
    I think this is an important indicator of the efficacy and fairness of Cambridge's selection process and I would like to see the university be a bit more vocal about this - in particular as a strong response to political and media footballing, and indeed the insinuation of many in this thread of bias against state/private/international/home/etc students.
    Thanks. I think sometimes we do need to be more vocal. It is difficult but it usually feels as if we are always on the defensive and it is difficult to be too vocal because there will always be people who can point to things we have got wrong.
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    OK. So in the end I found out I was rejected. It came on UCAS today, even though the decision that I would not be considered for an open offer in medicine was probably made on Wednesday (if I remember correctly). Also, I have not received any email from my college confirming this as of yet.
    I know this is really up to every college, but they could have let me know last week, as they had previously said they would be in touch as soon as they knew something. Having received no information, I had the false impression I was being considered for an open offer. The more disappointing it was today to find out about the rejection.

    Anyway, having come so close (getting into the pool), I am now considering reapplying next year. The only thing that troubles me, however, is that I am not sure taking a gap year would be worthwhile. In my country it is not usual to do so and at the moment (while I admit I haven't researched it yet) I don't know if I could fill the whole year up with an useful activity so tha that I would be really busy. Also, if I indeed decided to have a year off, I would not get a lot of support. Even though my parents would like me to get into Cambridge, they see a gap year as a waste of time and don't want me to do that (points at how foreign the concept of gap year is in my country, I suppose). Not that I couldn't decide on my own but there is this sort of pressure present.
    Would it be still possible for me to get into Cambridge if I started studying at an university at home, applied again and then started at Cambridge from the year one? How would that be looked at by the admission tutors? Would it be a reason not to give me an offer or a serious disadvantage?
    Thanks for an answer.
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    (Original post by GeorgeCZE)
    OK. So in the end I found out I was rejected. It came on UCAS today, even though the decision that I would not be considered for an open offer in medicine was probably made on Wednesday (if I remember correctly). Also, I have not received any email from my college confirming this as of yet.
    I know this is really up to every college, but they could have let me know last week, as they had previously said they would be in touch as soon as they knew something. Having received no information, I had the false impression I was being considered for an open offer. The more disappointing it was today to find out about the rejection.

    Anyway, having come so close (getting into the pool), I am now considering reapplying next year. The only thing that troubles me, however, is that I am not sure taking a gap year would be worthwhile. In my country it is not usual to do so and at the moment (while I admit I haven't researched it yet) I don't know if I could fill the whole year up with an useful activity so tha that I would be really busy. Also, if I indeed decided to have a year off, I would not get a lot of support. Even though my parents would like me to get into Cambridge, they see a gap year as a waste of time and don't want me to do that (points at how foreign the concept of gap year is in my country, I suppose). Not that I couldn't decide on my own but there is this sort of pressure present.
    Would it be still possible for me to get into Cambridge if I started studying at an university at home, applied again and then started at Cambridge from the year one? How would that be looked at by the admission tutors? Would it be a reason not to give me an offer or a serious disadvantage?
    Thanks for an answer.
    I know a NST at Catz who was rejected started a chemistry degree in his home country while reapplying and is now here. I hazard a guess they would not look on it too favourably but it certainly wouldn't stop you getting an offer.
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    (Original post by GeorgeCZE)
    OK. So in the end I found out I was rejected. It came on UCAS today, even though the decision that I would not be considered for an open offer in medicine was probably made on Wednesday (if I remember correctly). Also, I have not received any email from my college confirming this as of yet.
    I know this is really up to every college, but they could have let me know last week, as they had previously said they would be in touch as soon as they knew something. Having received no information, I had the false impression I was being considered for an open offer. The more disappointing it was today to find out about the rejection.

    Anyway, having come so close (getting into the pool), I am now considering reapplying next year. The only thing that troubles me, however, is that I am not sure taking a gap year would be worthwhile. In my country it is not usual to do so and at the moment (while I admit I haven't researched it yet) I don't know if I could fill the whole year up with an useful activity so tha that I would be really busy. Also, if I indeed decided to have a year off, I would not get a lot of support. Even though my parents would like me to get into Cambridge, they see a gap year as a waste of time and don't want me to do that (points at how foreign the concept of gap year is in my country, I suppose). Not that I couldn't decide on my own but there is this sort of pressure present.
    Would it be still possible for me to get into Cambridge if I started studying at an university at home, applied again and then started at Cambridge from the year one? How would that be looked at by the admission tutors? Would it be a reason not to give me an offer or a serious disadvantage?
    Thanks for an answer.

    Do you have any other offers to study medicine yet?
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    (Original post by uklizzie)
    Do you have any other offers to study medicine yet?
    I do have a sure entrance into a couple of universities here in the Czech Republic. But Cambridge was obviously the first choice.
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    (Original post by GeorgeCZE)
    I do have a sure entrance into a couple of universities here in the Czech Republic. But Cambridge was obviously the first choice.
    Which college did you apply to? I'm sorry to hear that.
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    (Original post by GeorgeCZE)
    I do have a sure entrance into a couple of universities here in the Czech Republic. But Cambridge was obviously the first choice.
    Does choice of uni really matter for medicine? Aren't all courses roughly equivalent and you'll get a good job no matter where you graduate from (to an extent)?
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    (Original post by davros)
    To be fair, if you go back and re-read your first post in this discussion, it does come across as a potential troll post - it's barely understandable as it's written!

    Venting your disappointment is one thing, but if you think there is a flaw in the Cambridge admissions system then at least try to articulate what it is so people can investigate whether you have a genuine grievance or not.

    I'm not trying to get at you - I was the first person in my family to get ANY qualifications, and the first person from my state school to get into Cambridge, but I'm struggling to make out from your posts exactly what it is that you're complaining about
    I'm complaining about state school quotas and what could be seen as an unfair playing ground and system. But good luck to you and very well done. I would also be the first from my family to get to university. Roll on York....
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    There has been so much talk
    Of 'bias' and 'fair' and 'state versus independent' that I just wanted to chip
    In.

    I was a teenage mum, my highest point of education at the time of my sons application to Cambridge was a handful of poor GCSEs, (I'm now at uni in London) He attended state school and never had extra tutoring or special help. However, he is now at Cambridge studying medicine. He worked hard and gained 4 A*s and 1 A at A level. I believe he was judged on his abilities, which is how it should be.

    There are people who do poorly in both state and independent schools and also people who do amazingly at both. That's how I feel Cambridge judge their applicants, on their achievements, and never felt my son was hindered by his background. He made the choice to work hard and it's paid off. I know lots of brilliant people apply to Cambridge and don't get in but I guess the experience the admissions tutors has to be trusted.




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    (Original post by GeorgeCZE)
    I do have a sure entrance into a couple of universities here in the Czech Republic. But Cambridge was obviously the first choice.

    Was Cambridge the only UK university that you applied to? Getting a place to study medicine in the UK at any top university is very difficult. I know someone that got no offers first time around, took a gap year, tried again and then got just one offer. They have good grades but first time lacked in their personal statement so used the gap year to gain experience. If you already have offers that you are happy to take then I am not sure it would be worth the risk/wait.....
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    (Original post by a123a)
    Which college did you apply to? I'm sorry to hear that.
    Churchill. The place is nice and they seem to be kind but it looks like they do not respond on time. The information I had been pooled came also late.
    (Original post by TVIO)
    Does choice of uni really matter for medicine? Aren't all courses roughly equivalent and you'll get a good job no matter where you graduate from (to an extent)?
    Well, it does matter where you study I think. I know a couple of people who can compare both systems. And while Czech universities don't produce bad doctors, the whole organisation of teaching, background, workig opportunities... seem to be considerably better in the UK.
    As for British unis, I really like the Oxbridge system of tutorials/supervisions.
 
 
 
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