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GCSE CORE SCIENCE B1 C1 P1 Exams 2016 {OFFICIAL THREAD} EDEXCEL ONLY Watch

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    (Original post by mlpepper)
    So guys, the 6 markers...
    First one
    Link properties of steel, copper and aluminium to their uses. And also reasons why metals are recycled?

    Second one
    Describe cracking of paraffin in a small labatory, and why do oil companies need to carry out cracking?

    It's obviously not the perfect wording but it was along those lines. What did everyone answer and think of the questions?
    first one I wrote about aircraft bodies, cutlery and electrical wiring and then went on to describe the properties. Said stuff about the sacrificial layer of oxygen on aluminium to galvanise it etc and said stuff about preserving the ore etc etc

    second one I defined cracking and explained it was a thermal decomposition reaction and gave the aluminium oxide and zeolite catalysts needed within it, spoke of supply & demand and how the alkanes were useful and in great supply whereas alkenes went to the polymer industry, spoke about why its important to break down long chain alkanes using information from the table it gave etc etc
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    For the more accurate temperature one, I said to use a polystyrene cup because less heat will escape, making it more accurate...is this right pls

    This is for the aqa chemistry exam today
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    (Original post by mlpepper)
    So guys, the 6 markers...
    First one
    Link properties of steel, copper and aluminium to their uses. And also reasons why metals are recycled?

    Second one
    Describe cracking of paraffin in a small labatory, and why do oil companies need to carry out cracking?

    It's obviously not the perfect wording but it was along those lines. What did everyone answer and think of the questions?
    Those six markers were godsends for me!

    First six marker:

    Steel being used in bridges because it is resistant to corrosion and strong.

    Aluminium being used in aircrafts because it is low density - 'lightweight' and also does not conduct electricity nor does it corrode easily.

    Copper used in copper wiring because it is a good conductor of electricity.

    Recycling these metals because it means they'll last longer and the extraction processes release gases, plus it's expensive to extract aluminium because it needs to be electrolysed.

    Second six marker:

    I drew the paraffin wool experiment and labelled the diagram.

    I then spoke about oil companies braking down the hydrocarbons because shorter hydrocarbon molecules are of higher demand, for example data from the table shows that the amount of gases obtained from crude oil alone is 2% whilst relative demand is at 5% so by cracking, a process I which longer hydrocarbon molecules are decomposed into shorter molecules, we can meet the demand of gases.
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    (Original post by L0st45)
    Those six markers were godsends for me!

    First six marker:

    Steel being used in bridges because it is resistant to corrosion and strong.

    Aluminium being used in aircrafts because it is low density - 'lightweight' and also does not conduct electricity nor does it corrode easily.

    Copper used in copper wiring because it is a good conductor of electricity.

    Recycling these metals because it means they'll last longer and the extraction processes release gases, plus it's expensive to extract aluminium because it needs to be electrolysed.

    Second six marker:

    I drew the paraffin wool experiment and labelled the diagram.

    I then spoke about oil companies braking down the hydrocarbons because shorter hydrocarbon molecules are of higher demand, for example data from the table shows that the amount of gases obtained from crude oil alone is 2% whilst relative demand is at 5% so by cracking, a process I which longer hydrocarbon molecules are decomposed into shorter molecules, we can meet the demand of gases.
    I literally did exactly the same as you! On the cracking one, i also wrote under the diagram that as a safety precaution, the catalyst must continue to be heated until the deliver tube has been taken out of the water to prevent the water going up the deliver tube. I think it was just me being paranoid that I wasn't going to write enough, but it's only now that i realise it probably wasn't needed at all...
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    (Original post by caitlinford3)
    first one I wrote about aircraft bodies, cutlery and electrical wiring and then went on to describe the properties. Said stuff about the sacrificial layer of oxygen on aluminium to galvanise it etc and said stuff about preserving the ore etc etc

    second one I defined cracking and explained it was a thermal decomposition reaction and gave the aluminium oxide and zeolite catalysts needed within it, spoke of supply & demand and how the alkanes were useful and in great supply whereas alkenes went to the polymer industry, spoke about why its important to break down long chain alkanes using information from the table it gave etc etc
    On the advantage disadvantage of hydrogen as a fuel i think i forgot to put a disadvantage feel so bad
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    How many marks would i get i did structure of propene C3 H6 like this (2 marks)
    H H H
    C=C-C
    H H H

    (btw i did this with arrows from hydrogen to carbon)
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    Is Edexcel harder of easier than AQA?
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    (Original post by Taran001)
    How many marks would i get i did structure of propene C3 H6 like this (2 marks)
    H H H
    C=C-C
    H H H

    (btw i did this with arrows from hydrogen to carbon)
    edit: sorry, i think you'll only get one because the final carbon you've only given three bonds, whereas you've given the middle carbon five, which is wrong because carbons only have four bonds. I think you'll get one mark for putting a double bond in, but you won't get full marks

    (Original post by Taran001)
    On the advantage disadvantage of hydrogen as a fuel i think i forgot to put a disadvantage feel so bad
    wasn't it a two marker? You'll only lost one mark
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    (Original post by Taran001)
    How many marks would i get i did structure of propene C3 H6 like this (2 marks)
    H H H
    C=C-C
    H H H

    (btw i did this with arrows from hydrogen to carbon)
    I think you will recieve one mark for the fouble bond but to receive the 2 marks it should be
    H H H
    | | |
    C=C-C-H
    | |
    H H
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    (Original post by Taran001)
    How many marks would i get i did structure of propene C3 H6 like this (2 marks)
    H H H
    C=C-C
    H H H

    (btw i did this with arrows from hydrogen to carbon)
    Literally just type propene in on google. You'll see what you were supposed to put don't worry about it though. It's only 1 mark
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    any predictions for p1 edexcel on 25/05/16

    i need help with refracting and reflecting telescopes
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    (Original post by blizza15)
    any predictions for p1 edexcel on 25/05/16

    i need help with refracting and reflecting telescopes
    Refracting have two convex lens.

    The parallel rays of light enter the objective lens and the lens causes the rays of light to converge. The bit where all the rays of light meet is called the focal point. This is where the real image forms.

    The rays of light from the real image enter the eyepiece lens (second convex lens). The eyepiece lens causes the rays to spread out again so they leave at a wider angle than they did when the rays entered the eyepiece lens, which causes the rays to fill more of your retina causing a more magnified image.

    A reflecting telescope is a bit more complex.

    A reflecting telescope consists of a large and small concave mirror and an eyepiece lens.

    Parallel rays of light hit a large concave mirror. The large concave mirror reflects the rays which causes the rays to travel to the focal point. However, the focal point is behind the small concave mirror so instead of the rays going through the focal point they hit the small concave mirror and get reflected through a hole (there is a hole in the large concave mirror) and then meet at a focal point behind the large concave mirror. This is where the real image forms.
    The rays of light from the real image enters the eyepiece lens which spreads the rays of light at a larger angle than they were when they entered. This causes the image to fill the retina causing a magnified image.

    Sorry I probs explained this badly


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    (Original post by DamnDaniel2)
    Refracting have two convex lens.

    The parallel rays of light enter the objective lens and the lens causes the rays of light to converge. The bit where all the rays of light meet is called the focal point. This is where the real image forms.

    The rays of light from the real image enter the eyepiece lens (second convex lens). The eyepiece lens causes the rays to spread out again so they leave at a wider angle than they did when the rays entered the eyepiece lens, which causes the rays to fill more of your retina causing a more magnified image.

    A reflecting telescope is a bit more complex.

    A reflecting telescope consists of a large and small concave mirror and an eyepiece lens.

    Parallel rays of light hit a large concave mirror. The large concave mirror reflects the rays which causes the rays to travel to the focal point. However, the focal point is behind the small concave mirror so instead of the rays going through the focal point they hit the small concave mirror and get reflected through a hole (there is a hole in the large concave mirror) and then meet at a focal point behind the large concave mirror. This is where the real image forms.
    The rays of light from the real image enters the eyepiece lens which spreads the rays of light at a larger angle than they were when they entered. This causes the image to fill the retina causing a magnified image.

    Sorry I probs explained this badly


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    thank you but whats the difference between a real image and a virtual image also why cant we predict earthquakes and how do they happen:p:
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    (Original post by blizza15)
    thank you but whats the difference between a real image and a virtual image also why cant we predict earthquakes and how do they happen:p:
    So a real image is actually there haha, it's real. It's where the light of an object come together to form an image on a screen.

    For a virtual image, the light rays are diverging so the light from the object appears to be from a different place. So like a magnifying glass. The image appears to be much closer than it actually is but it's actually further away.

    We can't predict earthquakes because they're just not predictable. We have no way to tell when the tectonic plates will slide past each other and create an earthquake. However, there are ways where you can estimate when an earthquake will happen e.g. If there has been an earthquake in a certain location or near a certain location at regular intervals (like every 5-7 years or few months etc.) then we can predict when it's likely to happen next. This isn't accurate because it's likely that it won't happen in that exact location but we can have an idea of when it could occur.


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    Someone help! I'm so confused on the maths questions in physics. I know the maths isn't that hard but I can't do it maybe because of how they word the questions or maybe I'm just really bad at maths. The formula questions where you just plug in numbers are fine but for other questions I have no idea what you divide and times by what. I just get totally lost
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    (Original post by LaFleur786)
    Someone help! I'm so confused on the maths questions in physics. I know the maths isn't that hard but I can't do it maybe because of how they word the questions or maybe I'm just really bad at maths. The formula questions where you just plug in numbers are fine but for other questions I have no idea what you divide and times by what. I just get totally lost
    When there is a maths question, the information will always give you 2 units, and then ask you to find some answer using a different unit.

    Using a very simple idea to get your head around it, i'll use;

    Speed = Distance/Time

    The simpler questions will give you the distance and the time. Ignore all the "Jane is driving a car blah blah blah" stuff, and just focus on when it says meters, second, and km per hour. So for the simpler question, just take the informaion (they'll give you distance and time) then look at the front page with equations to get your answer.

    For the harder questions, they will just re-arrange the equation.
    So for this example they may give you speed and time, to try and work out distance.

    You look at the front page to see what you have, realise you have speed and time, and need to work out distance, so you just take the formula

    Speed = dist/time

    Rearranging give you either
    Speed x time = distance
    or
    Distance/speed = time.

    As we want to know distance in this example, you would just enter the numbers into the speed x time = distance formula.

    Bit of a long explanation, but I hope this helps!
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    (Original post by DamnDaniel2)
    So a real image is actually there haha, it's real. It's where the light of an object come together to form an image on a screen.

    For a virtual image, the light rays are diverging so the light from the object appears to be from a different place. So like a magnifying glass. The image appears to be much closer than it actually is but it's actually further away.

    We can't predict earthquakes because they're just not predictable. We have no way to tell when the tectonic plates will slide past each other and create an earthquake. However, there are ways where you can estimate when an earthquake will happen e.g. If there has been an earthquake in a certain location or near a certain location at regular intervals (like every 5-7 years or few months etc.) then we can predict when it's likely to happen next. This isn't accurate because it's likely that it won't happen in that exact location but we can have an idea of when it could occur.


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    thank you can you also help with electromagnetic induction and advantages and disadvantages of renewable and non renewable resources i hate this topic
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    Do you guys have any predictions for the physics 6 markers? It probably won't be Herschel and Ritter because that came up last year, didn't it?
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    (Original post by xotinz)
    Do you guys have any predictions for the physics 6 markers? It probably won't be Herschel and Ritter because that came up last year, didn't it?
    Nah it didnt, but it has come up before
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    any ideas of what might come up in the p1 exam on wednesday aqa?
 
 
 
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