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    (Original post by SM98.x)
    I really wish everyone the best of luck, and pray cognitive approach and biological approach to treating OCD does not come up Xx
    Don't pray for that - I love biology, more biological approaches and biology the better for me. lol.


    Good luck, everyone.
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    (Original post by angellll)
    Can anyone explain how the basal ganglia and the orbitofrontal cortex is related to OCD?
    I understand that the caudate nucleus in the basal ganglia suppresses signals from the orbitofrontal cortex and the worrying signals are sent to the thalamus.
    However, I don't understand what happens when the caudate nucleus is damaged.
    im not very sure on any of the research support but basically, normally when the orbitofrontal cortex sends 'worry signals' to the thalamus the caudate nucleus (part of the basal ganglia) supresses these. however research has found several areas of the frontal lobes of the brain to be abnormal in individuals with OCD, for example, a damaged caudate nucleus. consequently, the suppression of the 'worry signals' fails and these are sent back to the thalamus which alerts the orbitofrontal cortex and forms whats called a 'worry circuate'. all in all its an explanation for the high anxiety found in people with OCD.
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    psychology is on hold right now..im trying to cram all knowledge of eco arghg
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    Good luck!

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    I never knew we may have to evaluate the fight or flight response?!
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    AHHHH I'm in panic!!! I'm so scared for this exam. Revision hat on I have a couple of hours ( :
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    for the brain structure of OCD research support is found by menzies et al who conducted MRI scans on OCD patients and found that they had reduced grey matter on parts of their brain, mainly the OFC
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    (Original post by ali99)
    I never knew we may have to evaluate the fight or flight response?!
    Same. To be honest I don't think they'll ask a long mark question on biopsych as in the specimen papers the max mark question is 3/4 marks. It comes under the approaches section so there is basically only 12 marks on biopsychology.. That way I doubt they'd only ask one question on the whole thing
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    (Original post by adelemaexo)
    Same. To be honest I don't think they'll ask a long mark question on biopsych as in the specimen papers the max mark question is 3/4 marks. It comes under the approaches section so there is basically only 12 marks on biopsychology.. That way I doubt they'd only ask one question on the whole thing
    The only 12 marker for bio-psych is on the fight or flight response. Evaluation points include the fact that for women the response is more of a "tend and befriend" to protect their young which is caused by the release of Oxytocin, it doesn't explain anything, and the negative effects on the body.
    It's very possible that it could be a 12 marker.
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    (Original post by SM98.x)
    im not very sure on any of the research support but basically, normally when the orbitofrontal cortex sends 'worry signals' to the thalamus the caudate nucleus (part of the basal ganglia) supresses these. however research has found several areas of the frontal lobes of the brain to be abnormal in individuals with OCD, for example, a damaged caudate nucleus. consequently, the suppression of the 'worry signals' fails and these are sent back to the thalamus which alerts the orbitofrontal cortex and forms whats called a 'worry circuate'. all in all its an explanation for the high anxiety found in people with OCD.
    This makes so much more sense, thank you!
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    If they ask you to outline the behaviorist approach would you include SLT !!!!??
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    (Original post by Natashja)
    If they ask you to outline the behaviorist approach would you include SLT !!!!??
    Not really because they're seperate

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    (Original post by Natashja)
    If they ask you to outline the behaviorist approach would you include SLT !!!!??
    i think those are separate but it wouldn't hurt to add a brief description of SLT

    however i doubt the behaviorist approach will appear anyway since it was in all the specimen papers
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    [QUOTE=mali473;65069423]Not really because they're seperate

    Posted from T

    You would. The AQA textbooks states 3 approaches the behaviourist being one and in the textbook SLT comes under the behaviourist umberalla.
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    (Original post by Natashja;[url="tel:65069389")
    65069389[/url]]If they ask you to outline the behaviorist approach would you include SLT !!!!??
    Nope, just classical (pavlov's dog) and operant conditioning (skinners rat)
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    (Original post by Natashja)
    If they ask you to outline the behaviorist approach would you include SLT !!!!??
    Defined as separate on the spec' - it actually all comes under 'learning approaches', with it split into behaviourhist and SLT. Spec:

    "Learning approaches: the behaviourist approach, including classical conditioning and Pavlov’sresearch, operant conditioning, types of reinforcement and Skinner’s research; social learningtheory including imitation, identification, modelling, vicarious reinforcement, the role of mediationalprocesses and Bandura’s research."
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    anyone got a model answer for a 12mark question on the fight or flight response?
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    [QUOTE=Rigby16;65069449]
    (Original post by mali473)
    Not really because they're seperate

    Posted from T

    You would. The AQA textbooks states 3 approaches the behaviourist being one and in the textbook SLT comes under the behaviourist umberalla.
    I think when you explain the learning approaches you use all 3 but not with the behaviourist. I just did a 12 marker on describe and evaluate the behaviourist approach and there was no mention of SLT and Bandura in the mark scheme
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    (Original post by Kefte)
    Defined as separate on the spec' - it actually all comes under 'learning approaches', with it split into behaviourhist and SLT. Spec:

    "Learning approaches: the behaviourist approach, including classical conditioning and Pavlov’sresearch, operant conditioning, types of reinforcement and Skinner’s research; social learningtheory including imitation, identification, modelling, vicarious reinforcement, the role of mediationalprocesses and Bandura’s research."
    Thank you !!
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    (Original post by Kefte)
    Don't pray for that - I love biology, more biological approaches and biology the better for me. lol.


    Good luck, everyone.
    Do you have a model 12 marker?
 
 
 
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