Does anyone else feel genuinely depressed about Brexit.

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    (Original post by JRKinder)
    I couldn't have put it any more perfectly. Even setting aside all the major economic and diplomatic benefits, EU membership also provided many 'soft' benefits such as having the freedom to simply live anywhere else in the union, a benefit that, contrary to popular belief, benefits British citizens too. I did have plans to move to the continent later in life, but this has been quashed now as that job no longer exists. I also have a friend who lives in Germany, and visiting will be made more difficult because of this result. Just little aspects of life like this, that affect thousands of people, now face barriers due to our EU exit.


    (Brexiters):

    And regarding the steel industry crisis, the government was already committed to provide funds to rescue the industry if they could find a buyer. Even if this were not the case, it is arguably economically more viable simply to import cheaper steel. Pumping funds into a dying industry is like sustaining someone for a few more weeks on life support; no one wants to let go but in the end it will make little difference. If you think the job losses in this industry were bad, just wait until you see the thousands of workers who are now jobless as a result of Brexit, this includes large numbers of European civil servants, workers in the finance sector, contractors, building companies etc etc
    The govt wanted it both ways. They wanted to both find a buyer for steel and also vetoed an EU proposal to whack up the tariffs on Chinese steel. If any thing our own govt ruined steel industries all over the EU, in favour of a special relationship with China
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    Depression about Brexit. No not stupid. I'm not a the student, I'm 68 and have spent past 20 years trading in Europe. And in one night the pleasure, joy and friendships has been spoilt. The best way to describe what I feel is bereavement. It's losing a very close friend. Worst, this is our Berlin Wall, let's call it the Brexit Wall. Far right/ far left what's the different - they are the same side of the coin. Vindictive, callous, controlling and hateful, feeding on fear, prejudice, poverty and racial bigotry.

    Get everyone you know to registered to vote. Petition your MP with one message - don't support a new referendum in Parliament we'll vote you out. All 18-35s voting for in one direction is enough to kick almost any MP out. Three quarters of MPs didn't want Britain out of Europe: now make them stick to their word. This is not a rerun of the current referendum - this is a new referendum approved by a Parliament that can be elected by you. Use politics to kick the card table over and set your own agenda.

    I'm disgusted by the bigots of my generation who for selfish, racialist motives have done so much damage to your future.
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    (Original post by TercioOfParma)
    We gained a lot actually.
    Awesome reply.

    Gained recession.
    Gained the resignation of a PM.
    Gained the hostility of EU.
    Gained slipping to 6th largest instead of 5th largest economy.
    Gained the labour party disintegration
    Gained pound falling to pre-1985 value.
    Gained the possibility of Scotland leaving.

    Actually I am yet to find something that you actually lost by this vote?
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    (Original post by Still IN)
    Depression about Brexit. No not stupid. I'm not a the student, I'm 68 and have spent past 20 years trading in Europe. And in one night the pleasure, joy and friendships has been spoilt. The best way to describe what I feel is bereavement. It's losing a very close friend. Worst, this is our Berlin Wall, let's call it the Brexit Wall. Far right/ far left what's the different - they are the same side of the coin. Vindictive, callous, controlling and hateful, feeding on fear, prejudice, poverty and racial bigotry.

    Get everyone you know to registered to vote. Petition your MP with one message - don't support a new referendum in Parliament we'll vote you out. All 18-35s voting for in one direction is enough to kick almost any MP out. Three quarters of MPs didn't want Britain out of Europe: now make them stick to their word. This is not a rerun of the current referendum - this is a new referendum approved by a Parliament that can be elected by you. Use politics to kick the card table over and set your own agenda.

    I'm disgusted by the bigots of my generation who for selfish, racialist motives have done so much damage to your future.
    Hey there. Despite most people blaming ' older generation', no one blames you for anything. You are a normal person wishing to live a normal life and integrating rather than 'leaving'. You do not need to feel sorry for the new generation. They will thrive and survive this madness and come up with strict democratic do's and dont's in the future that regulates that 51.9% is not a clear majority. That will be the biggest learning for the world that true democracy is a clear majority, not a Russian roulette. They will learn and move on, and the numbers that are not killed economically will become stronger.

    Can I just say please don't give up. Make your voice heard at least once a day on every social media channel you can think of. This does not have to be the beginning of the end, and we do not 'have to accept' this decision until Article 50 has 'actually' been invoked. We do not have to be brought down and go into a deep permanent recession just because 51.9% people have ordered us to.

    We need a second referendum, and if that gives a clear result of more than 60% leave. Else it needs to be disregarded.

    People cannot jeopardize the country because of a slight majority of 51.9%. Please don't give up at this critical stage. Your country needs your voice to stop it making an idiotic decision because 51.9% is not a majority.
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    (Original post by normalperson7)
    Awesome reply.

    Gained recession.
    Gained the resignation of a PM.
    Gained the hostility of EU.
    Gained slipping to 6th largest instead of 5th largest economy.
    Gained the labour party disintegration
    Gained pound falling to pre-1985 value.
    Gained the possibility of Scotland leaving.

    Actually I am yet to find something that you actually lost by this vote?
    I understand the anger but don't over exaggerate or jump to conclusions on certain issues.
    - No recession yet
    - Is a shame but I'm sure plenty are happy to see the back of him.
    - Tbf the EU is being pretty civil about it, especially Merkel.
    - That was for like a day.
    - Hasn't happened
    - so? it's already gaining and will be back to normal soon
    - I seriously hope not but that would be the worst bit about the result if it happens
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    (Original post by 16characterlimit)

    I also realised how this vote was decided by baby boomers, who have lived their lives with free education, little debt and cheap housing, and in a final act of selfishness, in their dying breaths took a permanent decision we were unhappy with.
    only 35% of under 18-24 year olds turned out to vote.... obviously they had more important things to do.
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    (Original post by sebby491)
    I understand the anger but don't over exaggerate or jump to conclusions on certain issues.
    - No recession yet
    - Is a shame but I'm sure plenty are happy to see the back of him.
    - Tbf the EU is being pretty civil about it, especially Merkel.
    - That was for like a day.
    - Hasn't happened
    - so? it's already gaining and will be back to normal soon
    - I seriously hope not but that would be the worst bit about the result if it happens
    -Would be really good to understand a single argument (on TV or otherwise) as to what is going to stop the slide
    - Doesn't matter who liked him personally or who didn't, there is no leader
    - EU will act like a grown up and wait for Article 50, but they have made it clear it is not smooth sailing.
    - Its ok to have such a huge shift for a day and other shifts gradually? It has not really stabilized even though there has been time now to not overreact. Most people expected the overreaction, they are more worried about the longer term effects.
    - really? anyone care to count how many people have resigned? I lost track after 10
    - I agree this would be the worst result of the result, but cant hope anymore unfortunately

    The problem all over the news and social media is that there is no leader trying to show us positives of this. Only justify how the negatives are not so negative after all. The finger pointing and asking each other to come up with a plan is also not really helping to gain any confidence that something positive can and will come out of this decision.

    Its also quite insulting to call this 'democracy' when there was such a slight majority and not a very overwhelming one. If it was overwhelming, some people would have thought, 'I don't understand this, but the majority might have a point'. As it stands, it feels like this is gambling.
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    (Original post by normalperson7)
    Awesome reply.

    Gained recession.
    Gained the resignation of a PM.
    Gained the hostility of EU.
    Gained slipping to 6th largest instead of 5th largest economy.
    Gained the labour party disintegration
    Gained pound falling to pre-1985 value.
    Gained the possibility of Scotland leaving.

    Actually I am yet to find something that you actually lost by this vote?
    All of that pales in comparison to the ability to propose and set our own laws again.
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    I don't understand how anyone can say 'it wasn't a clear majority' that point can't and doesn't stand. In the case of voting with both options initiating change fair enough but how can you ignore a majority when it was against the status quo that the majority was achieved and therefore remaining is not just going against the majority but choosing the minority which is the complete opposite of democracy.


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    (Original post by Cluster1)
    I don't understand how anyone can say 'it wasn't a clear majority' that point can't and doesn't stand. In the case of voting with both options initiating change then not changing is fair enough but how can you ignore a majority by staying with the status quo when it was against this status quo that the majority was achieved and therefore remaining is not just going against the majority but choosing the minority which is the complete opposite of democracy.


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    (Original post by Cluster1)
    I don't understand how anyone can say 'it wasn't a clear majority' that point can't and doesn't stand. In the case of voting with both options initiating change fair enough but how can you ignore a majority when it was against the status quo that the majority was achieved and therefore remaining is not just going against the majority but choosing the minority which is the complete opposite of democracy.


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    If there are two options and both are 'new' options, then a slight majority is fine because there is equal uncertainty in both. But if one is status quo and the other is so uncertain that no one in the world can predict the outcome of the actions, then is a slight majority really fair to the people who don't agree with it?

    It is impossible now to go back, whether the consequences were understood or not before. But the question is whether a slight majority is enough for such world impacting decisions.
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    (Original post by normalperson7)
    If there are two options and both are 'new' options, then a slight majority is fine because there is equal uncertainty in both. But if one is status quo and the other is so uncertain that no one in the world can predict the outcome of the actions, then is a slight majority really fair to the people who don't agree with it?

    It is impossible now to go back, whether the consequences were understood or not before. But the question is whether a slight majority is enough for such world impacting decisions.
    I completely disagree the opposite should be true, and sure 3.8% seems like a slights majority but in reality it's over a million people


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    (Original post by seaholme)
    I have felt sick all day, and ashamed. And angry, with special little peaks of rage dedicated to the claptrap by degrees either ignorant, racist or both, that 'leavers' have peddled as their 'reasons'. If any of it were true I might have some sympathy, but it's people who know **** all, making important decisions about something which will affect me and everyone I know for potentially the rest of my life. Values I hold dear and all the potential and possibilities of being part of a big project like the European Union flushing down the drain of a xenophobic toilet somewhere in middle England.

    If isolationist Britain is the future I want to have nothing to do with it, it is a sad pathetic insular little place with no ambition. Not only this but the country I grew up in and (previously) felt proud to be a member of will no longer even exist if Scotland leave. And if the Scottish feel anything like how I feel, they will leave. Then what?

    About the only perverse victory I can see in it for the Leavers is that at least if it's no longer worth living here, we'll have fewer immigrants, for every single wrong reason there is. All the people who think we are restoring national pride, or freedom, or prosperity will now have to face reality. Unfortunately I'm going to be sitting here in that godforsaken reality with them.

    God this is so ****ed up, people have no clue even about the magnitude of what this means.
    We are making 'serious' plans of moving to the US after this. But will see how their elections turn out. If Donald Trump is elected, then we may need to move to Scotland (even though its too cold and gray to have a decent shot of Vitamin D there). I would rather not live somewhere which goes against my basic principles as a human being.
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    (Original post by the bear)
    only 35% of under 18-24 year olds turned out to vote.... obviously they had more important things to do.

    There's likely to be an election in the next 4-6 months.

    Register now - https://www.gov.uk/register-to-vote

    I could be called a baby boomer, but do I like racialism and bigotry - NO. Can't speak for Farage and cohorts. And do you really want Johnson as prime minister, with Farage as his unelected no. 1.?

    Would it be possible to overturn the referendum - possibly yes with a new parliament. Every 18 - 35 needs to do is vote for the candidate who commits to a new referendum.
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    (Original post by Cluster1)
    I completely disagree the opposite should be true, and sure 3.8% seems like a slights majority but in reality it's over a million people


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    Disagreeing is fine. Controlling my future due to a slight majority is not. Millions were for and millions against.
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    (Original post by normalperson7)
    Disagreeing is fine. Controlling my future due to a slight majority is not. Millions were for and millions against.
    What your saying is you disagree democracy.. Just because you prefer things as they are and in your view they are 'better' doesn't make it OK to have an undemocratic referendum


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    (Original post by Miracle Day)
    I am absolutely devastated. I feel a deep sense of loss and regret. It's disgraceful that we've turned our backs on our closest allies and that immigration (with xenophobic/racist undertones) was the driving force here. And stuck our middle fingers up to the experts, to the people we look up to, the brightest minds and best role models of this country. And now we have to follow Nigel Farage's bleak view of this world.
    Yes. This is how I feel too. Why choose to ignore experts is something I am at a loss to understand too. Its like if I have cancer, I treat it at home instead of going to experts. Why?
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    (Original post by Cluster1)
    What your saying is you disagree democracy.. Just because you prefer things as they are and in your view they are 'better' doesn't make it OK to have an undemocratic referendum


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    Going into a hiring freeze and recession and having racism attacks (and the possibility of a break up of UK) against my wishes feels like the most undemocratic thing that happened to me in my life. So yes, if being 'ordered' to obey a referendum with a slight majority is democracy, you are right, its against my principles.
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    (Original post by Mathemagicien)
    So, in other words, **** you, democracy?

    Democracy has tyranny of the majority as its core principle, and since the majority of people are idiots, you can't realistically expect good decisions. But, in a democratic state, everyone has to pay for the stupidity of the rest, and you are not allowed to pick and choose which democratic referendums and elections actually affect you or not. Either you have a problem with democracy, or with the stupidity of the population
    Good analysis! So normally the stupidity of the population as you call it, is not allowed to directly impact the life-style, jobs and investments of the intelligent people. The real question is, what are the steps the intelligent ones will now take to leave the stupid ones behind, making both the intelligent and stupid ones worse off?
 
 
 
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