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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    I did a physics degree and got nowhere with it :bawling:
    Wow rewlly? Well that's demotivatimg for me...
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    (Original post by NatoHeadshot)
    Wow rewlly? Well that's demotivatimg for me...
    They didn't say what grade they got at the end of it or if they did placements while doing their degree.

    If you can get a good grade and can show future employers that you've got experience before you graduate I don't see why you'd be worried
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    Is there such thing as a terrible degree? A lot of people dont do degrees for employment prospects, but because theyre interested in the subject area.

    I'm looking at a philosophy degree, though I have no interest in using it to further my career, more to expand my knowledge, and engage in a course.
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    I recommend people google Aaron Clarey. He may be a bit biased on certain topics, but overall he's a fantastic voice of reason for many.
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    (Original post by Tsrsarahhhh)
    Thanks for the words of encouragement . Recently I've been thinking about life after my degree and it's hard to keep a positive outlook on it when people are constantly telling you that you should do a more vocational degree. What are you doing now??
    As long as you leave your degree with some work experience, extracurricular , group work, leadership etc. you'll be fine. Linguistics is an awesome subject. Some modules can be quite logical like STEM courses too such as carrying out language experiments as part of psycholinguistics, drawing up syntactic tree structures, working with data sets and using phonological formulas.

    I'm working with my cousin on a startup right now and possibly returning to study but my last role was as a Training Development Manager (had work experience in). There are a lot of graduate areas where you just need the skills gained generally from a university degree, work experience and decent soft skills. You just need to work hard and be focused.
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    (Original post by jake4198)
    Hi,

    I know my making this post is going to raise a lot of anger, especially among the new-age mob who say passion and determination are the only factors levying success, but sadly I have seen a lot of posts giving students terrible advice regarding their academic future by telling them a degree in a non-vocational and non-traditional subject will have little impact on their future job prospects. Put simply, it is morally indefensible to advice young people that a degree in some bizarre liberal arts discipline is a good use of their one-off student loan; employers nowadays have an abundance of graduates whom to choose from and being disadvantaged in one aspect of your personal profile because you were fed misinformation by your peers will lead many young graduates fighting it out for low-paid employment.

    Of course there will be people who will tell you how they've become a millionaire with their English degree from London Met, but we also need to have a sense of perspective. Do not go to university if you are not sure what you want to do with the rest of your life. University is expensive. And is £50,000 of student debt a burden you want to carry when you don't even have an end-plan in mind? There are a lot of graduate opportunities available for students who graduate from any university with a 2:1, but if you don't possess much added-experience alongside your academic qualifications, then the subject discipline holds a lot relevance. My Area Manager, who is a young graduate, told me that he was informed during his application process that students with "weak degrees in weak subjects" are ignored during selection. He said the degree that you choose to study at university says a lot about you as a person and the level of work ethic you acquire as well. Spending time in industry and developing proper work experience is a much better and more efficient use of time for those who don't know what they want to do than going to university, as work experience is paramount for employers and the on-the-work pay is an added bonus as well.

    Here's an excellent video I'd advice you all to watch:

    Good video for everyone that isnt at a top 5 uni.

    If you at a top 5 uni, just follow your passion.
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    (Original post by jake4198)
    Good
    - Engineering
    - Medicine
    - Dentistry
    - Veterinary Science
    - Mathematics
    - Physics
    - Chemistry
    - Economics
    - Accounting
    - Nursing
    - Computer Science
    - Law

    Bad
    - English
    - History
    - Gender Studies
    - Media Studies
    - Cultural Studies
    - Biology
    - Sociology
    - Psychology
    - Languages
    - Theology
    - Sport Science
    - Business
    - Design
    I find it incredibly ironic how you call Biology a bad degree despite the fact you have to take the subject up if you want to do Medicine, Dentistry, Vet med and some fields of Engineering which are on your "good" list.

    Psychology- Have you seen the state of the mental health among young people?

    Languages- Please explain how Languages is a terrible degree?There's a huge demand for Languages graduates because so little do the subject and the starting salary of some is gobsmackingly high. Why don't you do your research? And I'll give an example too. My sister graduated with a degree in German and Italian. She graduated a month and a bit ago and she's already in a job with a £24,000 salary. She's 22. Her friend who did Law (at Bristol) is still looking for a job.

    History, English and Sociology- Can think of loads of paths you could go through with those degrees.
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    (Original post by AppleB)
    Lmfaoooo
    Yeah I did double check that :teehee:
    I personally know teachers that have moved to Australia, New Zealand and Dubai
    There's a need everywhere
    :lol:
    There's a mahoosive demand for teachers in China, HK, South Korea and Japan. I looked up English teaching jobs in HK, Japan and China, some of the schools were offering to pay for the flights, the first few months of the accomo and discounts on department stores just for an English teacher.
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    (Original post by Assan)
    Banter? I take it by your ad hominem attacks that you have studied nothing worthy of a university degree, much less any degree that stresses reasoning.

    I am still waiting on someone to tell me what is studied in a WMST degree and to offer any clear reasons for the label it has received.

    I'm starting to wonder if no one has because no one has a clue

    My point is that it seems that the same people stressing rigour in education are the same people operating from received "wisdom,", ignorance, and prejudice rather than thinking any reasoned thoughts of their own.

    And I'm speaking not only in defense of WMST, but in defense of most, if not all, of the degrees listed under "MM degrees." I have no reason to take this personally; my law degree is listed under the "approved" courses by GroupThink, after all.
    So I am not allowed to mess around and joke without somebody going "Muh ad hominem" or responding by going "muh orthonographical error you got it wrong"?

    Besides, I am doing computer science at uni (within 6 weeks), something I have studied and read at GCSE and A level, as well as having read far more complicated aspects since I was 12 (for instance, I wrote a floppy disk booting operating system when I was 15). Now, if you're learned you will know that computer science has a large component of formal logic, and hence reasoning and problem solving.

    Alright, allow me to explain why there is an issue with a lot of WS degrees. Go and look at the reading lists (you don't even need to study it), look at the authors and you will realise that in a lot of these courses don't provide contradicting arguments to a lot of these concepts like patriarchy, which is a sign of a propaganda degree over a good academic one in the humanities, which would have different viewpoints.
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    (Original post by TercioOfParma)
    So I am not allowed to mess around and joke without somebody going "Muh ad hominem" or responding by going "muh orthonographical error you got it wrong"?

    Besides, I am doing computer science at uni (within 6 weeks), something I have studied and read at GCSE and A level, as well as having read far more complicated aspects since I was 12 (for instance, I wrote a floppy disk booting operating system when I was 15). Now, if you're learned you will know that computer science has a large component of formal logic, and hence reasoning and problem solving.

    Alright, allow me to explain why there is an issue with a lot of WS degrees. Go and look at the reading lists (you don't even need to study it), look at the authors and you will realise that in a lot of these courses don't provide contradicting arguments to a lot of these concepts like patriarchy, which is a sign of a propaganda degree over a good academic one in the humanities, which would have different viewpoints.
    Having studied History and WMST as a double major, I think I'm in a position to comment on the humanities and WMST.

    Let me state up front that I will not be defending all aspects of a WMST degree. There are certain elements of which I disapprove. Ultimately, however, I think that the degree should be reformed, not abolished.

    But some points:

    There is no WMST degree, no reading list

    My WMST was interdisciplinary. That means I was able to take any course from a department approved list. I ended up choosing lots of courses in Philosophy and History (to fulfill credit requirements for my History degree). I also studied other courses, like English and Political Science. During the course of my degree, I studied epistemology and philosophy of science, jurisprudence, psychoanalytic theory, critiques of economic theory, and ethics. There were very few core courses, maybe 5. Other WMST students chose other subjects.

    All of that to say...a WMST degree IS a humanities and/or social sciences degree, but it is the humanities through the lens of the political, ideological, philosophical, economic, semantic and other structures that exclude marginalized people. Sometimes these people are women; other times they are disabled, poor, black, etc.

    Utility
    - This is extremely useful for policy analysis - my first job out of uni - and for campaigning and activism (such as when I wrote a pressure group's submission to the Human Rights Commission in support of an end to legalized discrimination against homosexuals.

    Propaganda
    - Following from that, the reading lists are different from class to class.
    - I agree that the degree would have been better with more exposure to radically different thinkers. This is not unique to WMST, but it is a reform I'd like to see.

    Rigour
    - What made WMST so challenging because was the need to adapt to different conventions in different disciplines, often entering at 3rd or 4th year. It taught me to develop agile thinking, to analyze a discipline, get to its crux and identify its habits, and adapt to various ways of thinking. Because of this, it was more challenging than my more well-respected major.

    - I truly learned to question. And that habit of questioning is also pointed at my education as a WMST student - both its failures and successes.

    There are other, deeper reasons why I am grateful to have fallen into that degree. It taught me so much compassion and empathy, and it gave me a framework to explain the confounding social phenomena that had troubled me way before I got there. That was most valuable. But I think those points suffice for now.
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    (Original post by Assan)
    Having studied History and WMST as a double major, I think I'm in a position to comment on the humanities and WMST.

    Let me state up front that I will not be defending all aspects of a WMST degree. There are certain elements of which I disapprove. Ultimately, however, I think that the degree should be reformed, not abolished.

    But some points:

    There is no WMST degree, no reading list

    My WMST was interdisciplinary. That means I was able to take any course from a department approved list. I ended up choosing lots of courses in Philosophy and History (to fulfill credit requirements for my History degree). I also studied other courses, like English and Political Science During the course of my degree, I studied epistemology and philosophy of science, jurisprudence, psychoanalytic theory, critiques if economic theory, and ethics. There were very few core courses, maybe 5. Other WMST students chose other subjects. All of that to say...a WMST degree IS a humanities degree, but it is the humanities through the lens of the political, ideological, philosophical, economic, semantic and ither structures that exclude marginalized people. Sometimes these,people are women; other times they are disabled, poor, black, etc.

    Utility
    - This is extremely useful for policy analysis - my first job out of uni - and for campaigning and activism (such as when I wrote a pressure group's submission to the Human Rights Commission in support of an end to legalized discrimination against homosexuals.

    Propaganda
    - Following from that, the reading lists are different from class to class.
    - I agree that the degree would have been better with more exposure to radically different thinkers. This is not unique to WMST, but it is a reform I'd like to see.

    Rigour
    - What made WMST so challenging because of the need to adapt to different conventions in different disciplines, often entering at 3rd or 4th year. It taught me to develop agile thinking, to analyze a discipline, get to its crux and identify its habits, and adapt to various ways of thinking. It was harder than my major.
    - I truly learned to question. And that habit of questioning is also pointed at my education as a WMST students, both its failures and successes.

    There are other, deeper reasons why I am grateful to have fallen into that degree. It taught me so much compassion and empathy, and it gave me a framework to explain the confounding social phenomena that had troubled me way before I got there. That was most valuable. But I think those points suffice for now.
    So you don't read books or study for WMST? Other courses I have seen have a reading list for each course under the degree they take.
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    The underlying assumption here is that one pursues a degree purely for the sake of potential future earnings. I study history because I love it, not because I care what some recruitment manager at some dull city corporation thinks.
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    (Original post by TercioOfParma)
    So you don't read books or study for WMST? Other courses I have seen have a reading list for each course under the degree they take.
    I wrote a whole post for you. Read it
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    (Original post by Assan)
    I wrote a whole post for you. Read it
    I know that I am just asking about saying there is no reading list. I have yet to see a WMST course, let alone a humanities course with no reading list, so I have no idea where you have studied but I doubt that statement.
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    (Original post by TercioOfParma)
    I know that I am just asking about saying there is no reading list. I have yet to see a WMST course, let alone a humanities course with no reading list, so I have no idea where you have studied but I doubt that statement.
    Again, if you read just the paragraph immediately beneath that....you will see what I meant.
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    (Original post by colourtheory)
    I study history because I love it, not because I care what some recruitment manager at some dull city corporation thinks.
    And this is comes from a History student...
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    There's a mahoosive demand for teachers in China, HK, South Korea and Japan. I looked up English teaching jobs in HK, Japan and China, some of the schools were offering to pay for the flights, the first few months of the accomo and discounts on department stores just for an English teacher.
    LOOL
    Wow
    That's cool

    I'd go Japan personally.
    :ahee:
    Tokyo looks nice
    • TSR Support Team
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    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by AppleB)
    LOOL
    Wow
    That's cool

    I'd go Japan personally.
    :ahee:
    Tokyo looks nice
    Look into the JET programme, pretty solid option post-uni

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Look into the JET programme, pretty solid option post-uni

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    That's soooooo cool!!!
    Do you sign up for it?
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    And this is comes from a History student...
    An Oxford history student, yes. Interest is a matter of perception - though it'd require some critical faculty in order to reach that conclusion.
 
 
 
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