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Why do people here hate Warwick so much? Is it bad? Watch

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    (Original post by Athematica)
    My understanding is that my brother has been tutored by a distinguished professor, strictly because of the systems Oxford and Cambridge afford (1:1 - 1:3 groups with the professors in each field). This system of having exposure to these brilliant people in intimate, personal settings seems reason enough to hold elitist views about the institutions, does it not? As you mention, elsewhere this would never happen.
    I suppose so. It's different for Oxbridge as you cannot work there unless you are distinguished, thus, the whole question of being taught by a lecturer, senior lecturer or reader becomes redundant, as even the simple lecturer would need to have a certain level of achievement to work in Oxbridge. You are right, in that sense.

    I'm not questioning why the institutions are held in such high regard by society. They have both earned the right to that. I'm talking about the more extreme case, of people thinking someone is inept just because they are not a oxbridge student. And, although I'm doing my A-levels, I know of multiple seniors, who, despite being enrolled in reputable Russell group universities, have recounted experiences with Oxbridge students being snooty and high-nosed towards them. I myself, have met a few. Once, I told a student that I was considering firming Durham for Physics, and the distasteful look given to me, I shall never forget in my entire life.

    And, as someone who's come across people from Ivy-league universities as well, it just puzzles me that the british attitude towards Oxbridge is almost fanatic. Americans aren't nearly as awe-struck by places like Princeton and Harvard, as an average British is with Oxbridge. I'm not american, but I do have a certain respect for their work ethic. For them, it's less about where you study, and more about what you do. You could go to community college, and still get as much respect for writing a research paper, as you would if you went to MIT. I'm not saying this is good or bad, I'm just saying that it's not right to think to unconsciously underestimate a physics student from Manchester, just because they're not an Oxbridge student. It's a long race, and basically, the point I'm trying to make is, getting into Oxbridge does not mean you're set for life.

    But, I do believe now I'm being biased. I'm sure this is not solely the case for all Oxbridge students. But ALL Oxbridge students I've come across seem to resonate this superiority complex. And as much as I don't want to, I can't help but begin to dislike this so-called wonder institution everyone worships. So much so that even if I did have a flicker of a chance of getting in, I would not want to study there. It doesn't matter, I recognise the fact that it will continue to produce nobel laureates, continue to discover and invent things that will change our world. My opinion is unnecessary and irrelevant.

    I'm really sorry for thinking this way about the institution. I don't blame people for being wonder-struck by these two institutions. They are, truly, great. But I think, it's the students who put me off.

    Obviously, this is my opinion. I'm sure this not the case, and I certainly HOPE this is not the case.
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    This thread shows you one very important thing, something that you do need to think very carefully about - 'rankings', 'league tables' and the juvenile 'mine is better than yours' stuff are utter nonsense - and no way to choose a University.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    This thread shows you one very important thing, something that you do need to think very carefully about - 'rankings', 'league tables' and the juvenile 'mine is better than yours' stuff are utter nonsense - and no way to choose a University.
    Absolutely. Going to uni, just for the sake of wanting someone to clamour for your attention because you're a student in Cambridge, is no reason, or motivation, to be educated. That's a universal truth in any field, in any institution. You're better off quitting now, because that attitude will never help you achieve excellence.
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    (Original post by fandom-queen)
    Absolutely. Going to uni, just for the sake of wanting someone to clamour for your attention because you're a student in Cambridge, is no reason, or motivation, to be educated. That's a universal truth in any field, in any institution. You're better off quitting now, because that attitude will never help you achieve excellence.
    Though it doesn't seem healthy, many seem to get much further than just university with this very drive, at least in what we'll call an 'objective sense', meaning monetary and otherwise unrelated to one's mental and emotional wellbeing.

    The advice to not use it as a motivator is something I agree with, of course. To do otherwise would compete with my idea of what it means to live well.
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    (Original post by Athematica)
    Though it doesn't seem healthy, many seem to get much further than just university with this very drive, at least in what we'll call an 'objective sense', meaning monetary and otherwise unrelated to one's mental and emotional wellbeing.

    The advice to not use it as a motivator is something I agree with, of course. To do otherwise would compete with my idea of what it means to live well.
    (Original post by fandom-queen)
    I suppose so. It's different for Oxbridge as you cannot work there unless you are distinguished, thus, the whole question of being taught by a lecturer, senior lecturer or reader becomes redundant, as even the simple lecturer would need to have a certain level of achievement to work in Oxbridge. You are right, in that sense.

    I'm not questioning why the institutions are held in such high regard by society. They have both earned the right to that. I'm talking about the more extreme case, of people thinking someone is inept just because they are not a oxbridge student. And, although I'm doing my A-levels, I know of multiple seniors, who, despite being enrolled in reputable Russell group universities, have recounted experiences with Oxbridge students being snooty and high-nosed towards them. I myself, have met a few. Once, I told a student that I was considering firming Durham for Physics, and the distasteful look given to me, I shall never forget in my entire life.

    And, as someone who's come across people from Ivy-league universities as well, it just puzzles me that the british attitude towards Oxbridge is almost fanatic. Americans aren't nearly as awe-struck by places like Princeton and Harvard, as an average British is with Oxbridge. I'm not american, but I do have a certain respect for their work ethic. For them, it's less about where you study, and more about what you do. You could go to community college, and still get as much respect for writing a research paper, as you would if you went to MIT. I'm not saying this is good or bad, I'm just saying that it's not right to think to unconsciously underestimate a physics student from Manchester, just because they're not an Oxbridge student. It's a long race, and basically, the point I'm trying to make is, getting into Oxbridge does not mean you're set for life.

    But, I do believe now I'm being biased. I'm sure this is not solely the case for all Oxbridge students. But ALL Oxbridge students I've come across seem to resonate this superiority complex. And as much as I don't want to, I can't help but begin to dislike this so-called wonder institution everyone worships. So much so that even if I did have a flicker of a chance of getting in, I would not want to study there. It doesn't matter, I recognise the fact that it will continue to produce nobel laureates, continue to discover and invent things that will change our world. My opinion is unnecessary and irrelevant.

    I'm really sorry for thinking this way about the institution. I don't blame people for being wonder-struck by these two institutions. They are, truly, great. But I think, it's the students who put me off.

    Obviously, this is my opinion. I'm sure this not the case, and I certainly HOPE this is not the case.
    Oh, absolutely. As I mentioned there, I'm perfectly aware that this mindset is what works, nowadays. Perhaps I'm more of an emotional being, where I do care about my mental-state and peace of mind. Being mechanical about things would be a better way to live, in the 21st century. Sadly, it's not an art I've mastered, yet.

    As I've reiterated, it is, in the end, just an opinion of a person who has a lot to prove. I do not think I have the liberty of judging oxbridge students, I have barely the academic credentials required to go to uni. Thus, I think I'd better stop. I have no right to judge anyone.

    It just wouldn't kill them to be a bit nicer to us 'ordinary mortals'
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    I just came across this thread as I'm applying to universities at the moment and I'm looking for what students consider to be bad about my favourites. Having read through a lot of negative comments I find it difficult to agree. The campus itself looked clean and modern (which is a benefit compared to Cambridge in my opinion which looked lovely on the outside but was largely quite dated and lacking in kitchens, social spaces and en-suites). On the open day all the students I spoke to seemed to genuinely love the university and their course (unlike Nottingham which I personally found to be quite dull) and though in places it's architecture isn't the most inspiring, and the isolated nature of being a campus university may be a downfall, I found the staff (for English degrees in particular, as that's my course of choice) to be so engaging and inspiring that it made up for it, and the sheer amount of genuinely good social spaces made me optimistic.The main downfall of Warwick for me is it's location - I'm worried about moving away from an insular community second year, being far away from the uni and what I'll have come to know and integrating nicely into a new community with people other than students. Also apparently the cheaper accommodation (i.e. Rootes) is pretty awful. idk I realise this is wrong but I just thought I'd put my two cents in.
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    (Original post by phoebecarys)
    I just came across this thread as I'm applying to universities at the moment and I'm looking for what students consider to be bad about my favourites. Having read through a lot of negative comments I find it difficult to agree. The campus itself looked clean and modern (which is a benefit compared to Cambridge in my opinion which looked lovely on the outside but was largely quite dated and lacking in kitchens, social spaces and en-suites). On the open day all the students I spoke to seemed to genuinely love the university and their course (unlike Nottingham which I personally found to be quite dull) and though in places it's architecture isn't the most inspiring, and the isolated nature of being a campus university may be a downfall, I found the staff (for English degrees in particular, as that's my course of choice) to be so engaging and inspiring that it made up for it, and the sheer amount of genuinely good social spaces made me optimistic.The main downfall of Warwick for me is it's location - I'm worried about moving away from an insular community second year, being far away from the uni and what I'll have come to know and integrating nicely into a new community with people other than students. Also apparently the cheaper accommodation (i.e. Rootes) is pretty awful. idk I realise this is wrong but I just thought I'd put my two cents in.
    If you're worried about being far away from the uni, you can endeavor to sort out accommodation early and sort out a house in Canley. It's rough in places, or so I've heard, but a large part of it is within walking distance of the uni (well, it all is really, but you can get places a stone's throw from Westwood).
    Personally I lived in Earlsdon second year (will be again this year) and it's not too bad, buses are 10-15 minutes depending on traffic (perhaps a bit more at very busy times), and if you don't fancy buying the bus pass you could always cycle instead, which won't take too long. Leamington is the nicest area but yes the bus journeys can be somewhat more grueling. If you're the very independent sort who skips most lectures, that's alright, but being on an English degree I'd imagine lectures are a more important resource. Typically you won't need to do too much "integrating" in the new community - most will just band together with a few from their first year flat or people they know in societies to get second year accommodation.

    Well, I lived in Rootes in first year, and was tremendously introverted, and had a terrible time. Were I not, I imagine it would have been better, people are partying constantly (it is not that I have any issue with drinking or parties in general, I am just shy tbh, and this gets compounded the longer you avoid interacting with your flatmates) and I think most are able to bear the sometimes unpleasant conditions because of the superior social aspect. But if you just want a nice well-kept (not dissing the cleaners, it's just how fast people are able to mess the place up again lol) place and aren't too fussed about there being tons going on, don't put Rootes in your choices.
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    (Original post by phoebecarys)
    I just came across this thread as I'm applying to universities at the moment and I'm looking for what students consider to be bad about my favourites. Having read through a lot of negative comments I find it difficult to agree. The campus itself looked clean and modern (which is a benefit compared to Cambridge in my opinion which looked lovely on the outside but was largely quite dated and lacking in kitchens, social spaces and en-suites). On the open day all the students I spoke to seemed to genuinely love the university and their course (unlike Nottingham which I personally found to be quite dull) and though in places it's architecture isn't the most inspiring, and the isolated nature of being a campus university may be a downfall, I found the staff (for English degrees in particular, as that's my course of choice) to be so engaging and inspiring that it made up for it, and the sheer amount of genuinely good social spaces made me optimistic.The main downfall of Warwick for me is it's location - I'm worried about moving away from an insular community second year, being far away from the uni and what I'll have come to know and integrating nicely into a new community with people other than students. Also apparently the cheaper accommodation (i.e. Rootes) is pretty awful. idk I realise this is wrong but I just thought I'd put my two cents in.
    Its just personal opinion.. only reason I am not applying is I reckon the campus is just a bit ugly
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    If you're worried about being far away from the uni, you can endeavor to sort out accommodation early and sort out a house in Canley. It's rough in places, or so I've heard, but a large part of it is within walking distance of the uni (well, it all is really, but you can get places a stone's throw from Westwood).
    Personally I lived in Earlsdon second year (will be again this year) and it's not too bad, buses are 10-15 minutes depending on traffic (perhaps a bit more at very busy times), and if you don't fancy buying the bus pass you could always cycle instead, which won't take too long. Leamington is the nicest area but yes the bus journeys can be somewhat more grueling. If you're the very independent sort who skips most lectures, that's alright, but being on an English degree I'd imagine lectures are a more important resource. Typically you won't need to do too much "integrating" in the new community - most will just band together with a few from their first year flat or people they know in societies to get second year accommodation.

    Well, I lived in Rootes in first year, and was tremendously introverted, and had a terrible time. Were I not, I imagine it would have been better, people are partying constantly (it is not that I have any issue with drinking or parties in general, I am just shy tbh, and this gets compounded the longer you avoid interacting with your flatmates) and I think most are able to bear the sometimes unpleasant conditions because of the superior social aspect. But if you just want a nice well-kept (not dissing the cleaners, it's just how fast people are able to mess the place up again lol) place and aren't too fussed about there being tons going on, don't put Rootes in your choices.
    Thanks I think I'll just have to go again and think about it some more ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ at the end of the day though I think the positives about studying at Warwick far outstrip the negatives (at least from my perspective). Thanks for the advice! I'll be sure to look into a few of the things you've mentioned. 👍
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    It's not a bad university at all but a lot of people on TSR try very hard to promote it as being the 'next best thing' after Oxbridge/Imperial/LSE/UCL. Judging from the comments here, you'd think the university pays its students to spread word of mouth about it on TSR.

    In terms of prestige, Warwick is not even up there with Bristol, Durham or St. Andrews in my opinion. Those universities offer a far more 'traditional' university experience and attract far more students from top private schools (and private schools in general). Warwick is like a factory in comparison. Even the entry tariffs at those places are higher on average whereas Warwick's is merely inflated by its Maths and Economics departments, for most courses it isn't quite that high. It's up there with Imperial for Maths, but as an overall university, it's in a similar league as Birmingham, Nottingham and Kings. Maybe even Manchester. Still very good for a 50 year old institution, but you could argue even they're better universities since they're older, more internationally renowned, have far greater endowments, more nobel laureates, more impressive notable alumni, their campuses make Warwick's look like an FE college etc.

    It's a decent, top 20 Russell Group university, largely thanks to its Maths course and domestic rankings. Other than that, it doesn't have a lot going for it. It's not even a popular 'Oxbridge reject' uni - again, that's mainly just the Maths course.
 
 
 
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