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    (Original post by sean1960)
    Post Graduate Certificate In Education. Initial teacher training qualification for graduates entering schoolteaching. When I got mine, it also meant automatic state registration as as teacher. I can still remember my DFES number. They say prisoners never forget their prison number.
    So you need to do that course in order to become a teacher?
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    (Original post by sean1960)
    I remember filling a thick folio with lesson plans. Heavy to carry. WE were told to be devotees of the LP by the University. At the end of the course, I asked my supervisor if he wanted to see them. His answer? WE don't need to see your lesson plans. That was for your purposes. If I could have smashed him over the head with the LP folder and got away with it at that time!!

    Having worked as a teacher, you only need a small handbook for a LP and, in time, it can all be done in your head. It becomes automatic. Like driving a car or riding a cycle.

    The structure of a LP is cyclical, e.g. LP1

    1. learning aims/goals/objectives
    2. teaching techniques and methods to deliver [1]
    3. Resources required to deliver [1]
    4. Assessment/evaluation/marking : have the learning objectives been achieved?
    Yes? to LP2
    No? return to and recapitulate LP1. etc, etc

    We had lots of lesson plans to do, but as we went through the course they encouraged us to slowly change how we did them to develop our own formats that work for us. It is a LOT of paperwork but it does at least help you realise what you need and what you don't!

    Also, how you do them in your career is also dependent on whether your school requires a certain format

    My personal pet peeve is writing assessment notes on the plans after the session... I don't want them there because then I will miss them in the future! Notes on what worked/didn't and a highlight to show whether objectives were met I'm fine with, but if I make notes on individual children I just think how am I ever going to find these when I want to find out about that child in the future!

    xxx
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    (Original post by Carrot_Cake)
    So you need to do that course in order to become a teacher?
    I'm not so certain about that now. But I think you probably still need a state recognised TT qualification to teach in the state sector. When I was training, private sector schools were taking graduates without TT. As were FE colleges.
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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    My personal pet peeve is writing assessment notes on the plans after the session... I don't want them there because then I will miss them in the future! Notes on what worked/didn't and a highlight to show whether objectives were met I'm fine with, but if I make notes on individual children I just think how am I ever going to find these when I want to find out about that child in the future!

    xxx
    Oh yes. I recall doing all that. When I started teaching chemistry in a local comprehensive I thought to myself, what the hell was all that for...Sometimes you spent half of your time just creating the conditions in the classroom so that the teaching-learning process could actually take place.
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    School Direct, week 4, having a bit of a meltdown, support appreciated!...
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    (Original post by lantan)
    School Direct, week 4, having a bit of a meltdown, support appreciated!...
    Primary? Secondary? What's making you feel this way?

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    (Original post by lantan)
    School Direct, week 4, having a bit of a meltdown, support appreciated!...
    These things happen - you'll get through it.

    Talk to mentors, etc., let them know how you're feeling and discuss how they can support you. If you're tired and stressed and can't focus and are getting into that hideous cycle where planning takes you longer because you're stressed but then you have no time left and you get more stressed about it, take a break. You'll be more productive if you take an hour out (have a relaxing bath, watch TV, or something) then come back to it later.

    I had my meltdown after the first week of placement during the PGCE. Cried in front of half of the staff in my department as I literally had no idea how I could plan 3 lessons for the following day. One teacher took their class back for the day so I could concentrate on planning the other 2, and the following week we team-taught a couple of lessons too.

    Back then, planning 10 lessons per week seemed like a massive struggle and just wasn't achievable. Now, as a NQT, I teach 24 lessons per week and whilst I'm finding the workload pretty massive, it is doable. It seems impossible right now, but you can do this.
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    (Original post by myrtille)

    I had my meltdown after the first week of placement during the PGCE. Cried in front of half of the staff in my department as I literally had no idea how I could plan 3 lessons for the following day.
    Ah, those moments. I cried in a meeting about phonics with my class teacher because I just felt like I would never be able to plan phonics, it was taking all my time and I obviously wasn't cut out to be a teacher... I also cried for pretty much no reason on my first placement. Just felt like crying.


    Sometimes you really just need to get the tiredness, stress and feelings of inadequacy out of your system. I would completely agree that a break can help. You don't have to plan the perfect lesson every time. Even the most experienced awesome teachers have bad lessons or lessons where the pupils completely play up for no apparent reason. Plus SLEEP. Go to bed early.

    xxx
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    (Original post by Mr Advice)
    Who's yet to start placement? My uni has only placed a handful of people.

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    This seems strange to me. There is about 200 secondary PGCE students at my University and everyone pretty much got placed and started last week.

    My school is going to be challenging, I can see that already but I really can't wait to get started actually teaching, if things go wrong so be it, I want to learn and better myself with every year.

    Also, I don't get people trying to discourage others from beginning a teaching career. I haven't got my head in the sand, I know there's massive problems right now with the Government changing the goal posts all the time and this and that but hey, you're going to make a difference to people's lives. It may not be every person but it's going to be a large proportion of them. It may be stressful and hard work but so are a lot of other jobs and when people come home from them they may not feel the same sense of satisfaction.

    I'm only 22 so I know I'm young and have a long time to learn; personally I can't wait.
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    (Original post by Steveluis10)
    This seems strange to me. There is about 200 secondary PGCE students at my University and everyone pretty much got placed and started last week.

    My school is going to be challenging, I can see that already but I really can't wait to get started actually teaching, if things go wrong so be it, I want to learn and better myself with every year.

    Also, I don't get people trying to discourage others from beginning a teaching career. I haven't got my head in the sand, I know there's massive problems right now with the Government changing the goal posts all the time and this and that but hey, you're going to make a difference to people's lives. It may not be every person but it's going to be a large proportion of them. It may be stressful and hard work but so are a lot of other jobs and when people come home from them they may not feel the same sense of satisfaction.

    I'm only 22 so I know I'm young and have a long time to learn; personally I can't wait.
    Quite right ;-)

    I'm doing pgce primary, I'm 3 or so weeks in, I start placement next Monday I am beyond excited! I really can not wait to put my ideas in a classroom! I've been ready for the challenge of a pgce for a while now, and yes there's lots of work but it's all so interesting I'm really enjoying it!

    If your passionate about teaching don't ever give up on your dreams!

    The new NC for primary is now broken down into year groups, some of it is a bit bonkers and I'd say far fetched, but some of it isn't too bad, it's deffo more academic based, time will tell how it all pans out :-)

    Xx


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    (Original post by Mr Advice)
    Primary? Secondary? What's making you feel this way?

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    Secondary, Music!
    It was just a general stress - far too much paperwork (School and Uni altogether), a bit of a harsher observation feedback and I literally felt dizzy with tiredness and stress...


    (Original post by myrtille)
    These things happen - you'll get through it.

    Talk to mentors, etc., let them know how you're feeling and discuss how they can support you. If you're tired and stressed and can't focus and are getting into that hideous cycle where planning takes you longer because you're stressed but then you have no time left and you get more stressed about it, take a break. You'll be more productive if you take an hour out (have a relaxing bath, watch TV, or something) then come back to it later.

    I had my meltdown after the first week of placement during the PGCE. Cried in front of half of the staff in my department as I literally had no idea how I could plan 3 lessons for the following day. One teacher took their class back for the day so I could concentrate on planning the other 2, and the following week we team-taught a couple of lessons too.

    Back then, planning 10 lessons per week seemed like a massive struggle and just wasn't achievable. Now, as a NQT, I teach 24 lessons per week and whilst I'm finding the workload pretty massive, it is doable. It seems impossible right now, but you can do this.
    Oh, it wasn't as if I held it all in - I had to cry, and my mentor happened to be there so she knew exactly what was going on and was really supportive. I noticed she's a really perceptive person and notices the smallest change of my mood - if I'm tense, nervous etc. It's quite remarkable, actually.
    Anyway, it got resolved now and today was a thousand times better - three lessons taught and more skills learned for me, hopefully. I'm much happier.
    Of course, planing will be taking ages but it is not just the planning itself - it is the delivery of the lesson, as even the most brilliant of plans can go really wrong. I'll get used to things, I suppose.
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    (Original post by Steveluis10)
    This seems strange to me. There is about 200 secondary PGCE students at my University and everyone pretty much got placed and started last week.

    My school is going to be challenging, I can see that already but I really can't wait to get started actually teaching, if things go wrong so be it, I want to learn and better myself with every year.

    Also, I don't get people trying to discourage others from beginning a teaching career. I haven't got my head in the sand, I know there's massive problems right now with the Government changing the goal posts all the time and this and that but hey, you're going to make a difference to people's lives. It may not be every person but it's going to be a large proportion of them. It may be stressful and hard work but so are a lot of other jobs and when people come home from them they may not feel the same sense of satisfaction.

    I'm only 22 so I know I'm young and have a long time to learn; personally I can't wait.
    I'm doing Primary and from what I've heard it's harder to find placements in primary than secondary schools.

    On that, what happens if the provider fails to find a placement for some of us? Because there's still quite a lot of us to fill. Is the provider legally bound to? There must be something for if ever that scenario arises. Anyone know?

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    (Original post by Mr Advice)
    I'm doing Primary and from what I've heard it's harder to find placements in primary than secondary schools.

    On that, what happens if the provider fails to find a placement for some of us? Because there's still quite a lot of us to fill. Is the provider legally bound to? There must be something for if ever that scenario arises. Anyone know?

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    They will find one so don't panic. They just might have to sends more people further afield than they'd hoped.

    Legally... I'm not sure. I guess they would be as they've agreed to, but at the same time it's pretty much a factor beyond your control. I guess they'd at last offer you a place next year? But I've never ever heard of that happening.

    Am I right that you are a UEAer? Of so, last year it was close to the start of placement before we d found out, they just have to check them all and sometimes things change, eg an ofsted report (which has probably caused a lot of issues in Norfolk) or a pregnancy. In other
    pgces they have the same issues but if the placements start earlier that means they do the checking earlier.

    Xxx

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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    They will find one so don't panic. They just might have to sends more people further afield than they'd hoped.

    Legally... I'm not sure. I guess they would be as they've agreed to, but at the same time it's pretty much a factor beyond your control. I guess they'd at last offer you a place next year? But I've never ever heard of that happening.

    Am I right that you are a UEAer? Of so, last year it was close to the start of placement before we d found out, they just have to check them all and sometimes things change, eg an ofsted report (which has probably caused a lot of issues in Norfolk) or a pregnancy. In other
    pgces they have the same issues but if the placements start earlier that means they do the checking earlier.

    Xxx

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    It's alright now as I've been placed Guess they read this and got on their skates

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    (Original post by Mr Advice)
    It's alright now as I've been placed Guess they read this and got on their skates

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    In my experience it's always cut pretty close at UEA!


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    Teaching my first starter on Thursday - well it may be more than a starter. It's a year 8 class I've been observing for a few weeks (my mentor's class) and last week they played a word game based on 'call my bluff' but it didn't go so well as they were messing about etc so I'm basically doing the same thing with them but going to try hard to manage the class so they get more out of it this time.

    I am excited but nervous - on the whole they're not a bad class but there's a handful of pupils that mess about and disrupt others from what I've seen. I'm also conscious that my mentor will be in the class with me and I don't want to undermine her but at the same time I want to establish myself and lay down the law a bit, even if it is just an informal chance for me to actually stand up and lead a class before half term so that when I come back after the break I've already done something and so getting into teaching a few classes a week won't seem quite as daunting.

    Wish me luck/ give me any tips you think might help if you've been in my situation before!
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    (Original post by Steveluis10)
    Teaching my first starter on Thursday - well it may be more than a starter. It's a year 8 class I've been observing for a few weeks (my mentor's class) and last week they played a word game based on 'call my bluff' but it didn't go so well as they were messing about etc so I'm basically doing the same thing with them but going to try hard to manage the class so they get more out of it this time.

    I am excited but nervous - on the whole they're not a bad class but there's a handful of pupils that mess about and disrupt others from what I've seen. I'm also conscious that my mentor will be in the class with me and I don't want to undermine her but at the same time I want to establish myself and lay down the law a bit, even if it is just an informal chance for me to actually stand up and lead a class before half term so that when I come back after the break I've already done something and so getting into teaching a few classes a week won't seem quite as daunting.

    Wish me luck/ give me any tips you think might help if you've been in my situation before!
    Don't feel that you're undermining the teacher. You are working with the class together, so the pupils should view both of you as equally in charge pretty much.

    In primary (well, for my placements it was this way) the class teacher is in there a lot of the time. The teacher just takes a side role and is directed by you, it seems weird but you get used to it, and remind yourself that they are probably very happy about having a chance to sit back a bit and observe their students/build that relationship with them a bit more.

    xxx
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    (Original post by Steveluis10)
    Teaching my first starter on Thursday - well it may be more than a starter. It's a year 8 class I've been observing for a few weeks (my mentor's class) and last week they played a word game based on 'call my bluff' but it didn't go so well as they were messing about etc so I'm basically doing the same thing with them but going to try hard to manage the class so they get more out of it this time.

    I am excited but nervous - on the whole they're not a bad class but there's a handful of pupils that mess about and disrupt others from what I've seen. I'm also conscious that my mentor will be in the class with me and I don't want to undermine her but at the same time I want to establish myself and lay down the law a bit, even if it is just an informal chance for me to actually stand up and lead a class before half term so that when I come back after the break I've already done something and so getting into teaching a few classes a week won't seem quite as daunting.

    Wish me luck/ give me any tips you think might help if you've been in my situation before!
    Pick a behaviour point that you want to focus on and stick with it, and lay your expectations out before you start. E,g

    "My expecations of you during this task will be that you stay in your seats, and you raise your hand if you want to say something. This is my warning to all of you."

    Then the second someone gets out of their seat, or shouts out say "George that is your second and final warning. Make the decision to do that again and you will be [insert school behaviour policy/system]."

    They do it again - come down on them like a tonne of bricks, bench them, send them out, detention, whatever your school has in place/ Do not let them charm or talk their way out of it.
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    I'm at the end of my penultimate week of AP1 (school direct primary, with PGCE) and am pleased to report it is survivable!

    I've had my fair share of meltdowns (the 3 weeks prior to this were tough), but you really do get better at planning etc and you learn from every mistake. I've cried (a lot), often in front of people like my mentor (embarrassing!), I've had shouting matches at home for no apparent reason (oops) and I've cut my average sleep by about 20% just to get everything done, but here I am, emerging out of the other side. If I can do it, so can everyone else!

    Good luck to everyone who's just getting ready to start their first placements. Make the most of that first week observing - you'll be flapping about in the deep end soon enough!
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    Hey guys,
    quick update!

    im a week into placement, I've got quite a challenging school, (primary) and I've taught 3 lessons already, absolutely love it! It's brill, I even started a new topic with them, considered different work levels and continuous provision, really enjoying it!


    We have a science week coming up, as I've planned lots of work stations for them, gonna be fab! My tutors at uni have given me lots of ideas, even asking peers and building on their thoughts if your stuck with the planning side of things, :-)
    work load atm is manageable, I'm on top of it, and that's how I hope it'll stay haha my advice for that is do it when you get it, don't leave it to build up for weekend etc and plan lessons as soon as you get the timetables in PPA time :-) I have a slot in school time to do work too, so I generally get most things done then x
 
 
 
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