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    (Original post by Incarnadine91)
    I thought it meant something bad from the way he he said it, but still, veiled insults like that are just not cricket. Or hurling. Or whatever. :rolleyes: You will most probably get teased about your accent, but don't worry, it's all in good fun (plus I'm pretty sure you can give as good as you get).

    No, no, I understand perfectly To be honest my first tute wasn't based on the summer reading at all - I feverishly stockpiled books and tried to grapple with the concepts in them, only to be given an entirely different set for my first essay! I think the reading list is only ever meant to give you an outline of what's happening, the basic timeline/arguments, rather than a detailed understanding of the topic - that's what tutes are for! So don't bother looking into it too thouroughly, it's only really useful for that and for revision. I didn't read any books from my Hilary reading list at all and got on just fine

    You'll be given much more specific books - and lots of them! - for your essays, but remember that you never have to read all of them. I think in my first tutes I was given a list of 20-40 books, of which I read 10 and got the main points of my argument from less than 5. And to be honest 10 is a lot, most tutors will request 5-6 books read per essay. Oh, and take notes in your tutes! I didn't know you had to and cursed my idiocy come exams

    Any other questions, I'm glad to help
    Thanks so much, that's a relief! I've been panicking about Medieval stuff because this is the first time I've ever done it so I'm just trying to get a basic idea as best as I can! I'll deffo take notes in my tutes .

    Ehm, I have many that I can't remember right now... (you may regret offering to answer these, btw ) I can think of one, extremely stupid, questions...

    1. An acquaintance of mine did History and basically told me, point blank, not to bother with lectures. Obviously this varies from module to module and I'm not planning on doing so (initially at least ), but he said that I shouldn't go to lectures at all. I was just wondering if I could have your take on this?

    Yeah, I went over to visit a friend and had a good taster of the accent teasing ... I expect I'll get used to it.

    (Original post by Rachel*)
    There's only one other girl in my school going to Oxford, for law I think. And I don't know of anyone else. Oh lucky you! I have to keep checking to make sure I haven't lost the pin. I don't think I can face driving into school without knowing them, online results opens at 7am I think. Yeah they can be pretty awful sometimes! That's the one I'm most worried about!
    Ah, I'm the only one in either my year or the current A2 year going to Oxford. It does take the stress off, tbh. I remember I woke up an results day at 7.05am because my phone was ringing... one of mates had rung me to say she'd got A*AA. I was like, "Oh good for you!" through clenched teeth because I hadn't got my results yet! Don't worry, everyone's always convinced that their A levels will be bad... I'm sure you'll be grand! Make sure you go in and pick up your paper results at some stage, if your school is anything like mine... I had to wait until about February before they released our certificates so I had to carry arouind my printed out results for job interviews and stuff.
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    (Original post by Elrobi)
    Thanks so much, that's a relief! I've been panicking about Medieval stuff because this is the first time I've ever done it so I'm just trying to get a basic idea as best as I can! I'll deffo take notes in my tutes .

    Ehm, I have many that I can't remember right now... (you may regret offering to answer these, btw ) I can think of one, extremely stupid, questions...

    1. An acquaintance of mine did History and basically told me, point blank, not to bother with lectures. Obviously this varies from module to module and I'm not planning on doing so (initially at least ), but he said that I shouldn't go to lectures at all. I was just wondering if I could have your take on this?

    Yeah, I went over to visit a friend and had a good taster of the accent teasing ... I expect I'll get used to it.
    Ah, yes, I was exactly the same - I picked the Medeival module because it was the furthest removed from what I'd done at A-level, plus it got the compulsory aspect out of the way, and it really was being plunged into the deep end. So you're doing Brit II (1042-1330)? I did that What other modules are you looking at doing?

    Unfortunately, history gets seen by many as a doss subject. And in a way, that's true - it's possible to not go to lectures, write all your essays the night before, and scrape through with a 2:2 or even a very low 2:1. However, that said, if you want to have an enjoyable time at Oxford then do NOT do that!!! In a way it's harder than the sciences, where you have to go to every lecture and mustwork most hours of the day, because the amount of work you do is up to you. You need to have responsibility. It's your choice whether you have a few days off at the start of the week, then panic and rush out something at the end, or if you get your essay done first and then can relax for 24 hours before your tute. I choose the latter, it's a much nicer experience - even if it does require getting into the library at 9 for 6 days a week, having the last day without any stress whatsoever is the sweetest feeling imaginable!!! Plus of course, your grades are better at the end :cool:

    To answer your question in a more specific, less rant-ish way: you don't need to go to every lecture. If it's on something you're plainly not going to write anything about ever (and it's not being given by your tutor - they notice if you're missing...) then it's fairly safe to skip it. If it's more important than that but you have, say, a hospital appointment, you can get someone else doing that module to grab the notes for you and it won't make too much of a difference. BUT you'd be surprised what you need to have notes on come revision time, and lectures can give you some quality background information/examples that you'll find yourself using again and again. It's better to go to as many as possible and have a comfortable amount of notes for revision, just in case the topics you were planning to do don't go as planned, then be forced to write an essay on something you know nothing about because you skipped the lecture. We only have 5 a week and they're usually at 12 noon anyway, so it's not like you have to get up early for them! So basically, try to go to them, but don't panic if you miss it.

    Sorry, as you've probably guessed, people treating history like an 'easy' degree or saying that it's not as hard as the others annoy me, a lot. You try writing an essay on Malthusian demographic theory applied to the 16th century and then tell me I'm a slacker, dammit!
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    (Original post by Incarnadine91)
    As I said to deFossard, I'm happy to answer any history-related questions you might have!
    I thought I'd take advantage of this, and bug you with another question, if that's okay? I was reading the History handbook, and in the languages section it says that:

    "In the Third Year several Special Subjects are based on texts and documents in one or more foreign languages and can only be taken by students with an adequate reading knowledge of the language(s) in question. A number of Further Subjects also require knowledge of languages (French and Spanish), though the extent of that requirement varies with the particular courses."

    It also says that the University Language Centre offers some courses for free. I'm not the best at languages, but I've been thinking for a while that I'd like to brush up on my French, and maybe pick up some Italian. Just wondering, did you do this, and do you recommend that I do? How many subjects later in the degree will actually require it? I know that it would never do harm to learn a language, so it's probably not a bad idea anyway... just wondering how essential it is?

    Sorry this is so long-winded :blushing:
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    (Original post by laura_bird88)
    I thought I'd take advantage of this, and bug you with another question, if that's okay? I was reading the History handbook, and in the languages section it says that:

    "In the Third Year several Special Subjects are based on texts and documents in one or more foreign languages and can only be taken by students with an adequate reading knowledge of the language(s) in question. A number of Further Subjects also require knowledge of languages (French and Spanish), though the extent of that requirement varies with the particular courses."

    It also says that the University Language Centre offers some courses for free. I'm not the best at languages, but I've been thinking for a while that I'd like to brush up on my French, and maybe pick up some Italian. Just wondering, did you do this, and do you recommend that I do? How many subjects later in the degree will actually require it? I know that it would never do harm to learn a language, so it's probably not a bad idea anyway... just wondering how essential it is?

    Sorry this is so long-winded :blushing:
    Of course! I feel like quite the history oracle now, it's cool

    I'm hoping that it isn't necessary, because I am abysmal at languages and I didn't sign up for any of the courses - I was scared off by the fact you'll be tested on it each term. However, the fact that I don't have anything more than a very rudimentary Spanish does reduce the choice of papers that I could take, both now and in later years. For instance, I would have loved to have studied Machiavelli, but I can't because it's in the original Italian. Same with the third-year course on the French Revolution, it's closed to me. And even in your everyday books, you'll come across passages that the authors just couldn't be bothered to translate, usually from authors writing in the 50s when anybody with any education did two languages and Latin. It's not essential - I've got along just fine even with the Latin, online translators/a dictionary/friends with a better grasp of languages have been enough to see me through - but coming across "The bishop blessed the king with these significant words french french french french" is a bit offputting. Never mind the fact that the big rooms in Exam Schools, our lecture halls, are labelled in... you guessed it, Latin. So basically, I've coped without, but it's frustrating and hard work and limits my options somewhat. If you're up for it and aren't a complete failure at languages like me, I'd say go for whatever you feel comfortable doing. It's not essential, but it's useful.
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    (Original post by jenny18)
    Yes!! Me!!! i'm hopefully going for English, you?
    Medicine

    There's a girl from my school who's doing english too... the only other person from my school who's going off to oxford. She got her requirements too, which is pretty great for the statistics, I guess - 100% of our prospective applicants got in!

    Don't know what college she's going to though, I just know it's not Lincoln.
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    (Original post by ThatOtherGuy)
    Medicine

    There's a girl from my school who's doing english too... the only other person from my school who's going off to oxford. She got her requirements too, which is pretty great for the statistics, I guess - 100% of our prospective applicants got in!

    Don't know what college she's going to though, I just know it's not Lincoln.
    I'm the only one from my school who got an offer, so it's all down to me. Well, i look forward to (hopefully) meeting you in October. Just as a matter of interest, how many medical students will ther be in our year at Lincoln? There's meant to be 12 English people, but i've heard somewhere that there's only 8.

    Throwing a similar question out to everyone, what class sizes are you expecting? How different is that from what you're used to. I went to a private school where my biggest class was 10 and my smallest 3. Are people looking forward to the small classes? Or is that a lot of individual pressure??
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    Thanks for the quick reply

    You've convinced me that I'll at least invest in a couple of English- (French, Latin, Italian) dictionaries! The information on the actual University Language Courses website seems in conflict with that in the handbook, as it says that you have to pay £25 per term... That would impact my decision too.
    I've recently tried to teach myself a bit of basic latin- I really regret not doing the GCSE offered to me last year at school. I had a lot going on, which is a pretty bad excuse I know!
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    (Original post by laura_bird88)
    Thanks for the quick reply

    You've convinced me that I'll at least invest in a couple of English- (French, Latin, Italian) dictionaries! The information on the actual University Language Courses website seems in conflict with that in the handbook, as it says that you have to pay £25 per term... That would impact my decision too.
    I've recently tried to teach myself a bit of basic latin- I really regret not doing the GCSE offered to me last year at school. I had a lot going on, which is a pretty bad excuse I know!
    Ha, I did Spanish GCSE and I still can't remember any of it. You'll probably need the English-Latin dictionary, but I wouldn't get more than that unless you're going for a particular paper which requires it, in which case I would say get the course. And to be honest, Latin influences English enough that you can guess a lot of it quite easily. Most people do have to pay, but historians don't - it's free, don't worry :cool:
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    (Original post by Incarnadine91)
    Ha, I did Spanish GCSE and I still can't remember any of it. You'll probably need the English-Latin dictionary, but I wouldn't get more than that unless you're going for a particular paper which requires it, in which case I would say get the course. And to be honest, Latin influences English enough that you can guess a lot of it quite easily. Most people do have to pay, but historians don't - it's free, don't worry :cool:
    Awesome, yet another reason to love my subject choice I shall buy a latin dictionary, and I actually just went to the garage and dug out my old school French one. If the course is free I'll definitely do it, how exciting!!
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    (Original post by laura_bird88)
    Awesome, yet another reason to love my subject choice I shall buy a latin dictionary, and I actually just went to the garage and dug out my old school French one. If the course is free I'll definitely do it, how exciting!!
    History is obviously the best subject, because after all, as soon as anybody discovers anything in any other subject it becomes part of ours as well
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    (Original post by Incarnadine91)
    History is obviously the best subject, because after all, as soon as anybody discovers anything in any other subject it becomes part of ours as well
    Hahaha I like your logic :smug:
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    (Original post by Incarnadine91)
    Same with the third-year course on the French Revolution, it's closed to me.
    Oh no, same then
    I've considered the LASR courses - either on French, from my rusty GCSE, or German or Russian from scratch. But I'm also worried about time and a busy schedule.
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    (Original post by JAR12)
    Oh no, same then
    I've considered the LASR courses - either on French, from my rusty GCSE, or German or Russian from scratch. But I'm also worried about time and a busy schedule.
    I'm hoping to do Russian; bought a book on Wednesday and I'm going to make a proper start tonight. It doesn't seem too bad...
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    (Original post by micky022)
    I'm hoping to do Russian; bought a book on Wednesday and I'm going to make a proper start tonight. It doesn't seem too bad...
    You're being proactive My reading list is bad enough. But I would love to learn either Russian or German!
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    (Original post by JAR12)
    You're being proactive My reading list is bad enough. But I would love to learn either Russian or German!
    What subject are you doing?

    German is a horrid-sounding language, you could be calling someone beautiful and it sounds like you're threatening to torture them...
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    (Original post by micky022)
    What subject are you doing?

    German is a horrid-sounding language, you could be calling someone beautiful and it sounds like you're threatening to torture them...
    I don't get why everyone seems to have that impression; German sounds quite nice a lot of the time. People seem to assume it always sounds like Hitler giving a speech.
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    (Original post by dbmag9)
    I don't get why everyone seems to have that impression; German sounds quite nice a lot of the time. People seem to assume it always sounds like Hitler giving a speech.
    I dunno; I did it briefly in Year Nine and it seems like a very guttural, harsh language. Lots of hard consonant sounds and the like. I don't think everyday Germans sound constantly outraged
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    (Original post by micky022)
    I dunno; I did it briefly in Year Nine and it seems like a very guttural, harsh language. Lots of hard consonant sounds and the like. I don't think everyday Germans sound constantly outraged
    To me it doesn't sound that guttural or harsh; Arabic does, but a lot of German is pretty soft.
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    (Original post by JAR12)
    Oh no, same then
    I've considered the LASR courses - either on French, from my rusty GCSE, or German or Russian from scratch. But I'm also worried about time and a busy schedule.
    I should probably have clarified: one of the versions of the French Revolution course is closed to me, the one in which you work from primary sources, not the time period as a whole. There will probably be plenty of other options where you deal with translations, it's just they're by nature going to be slightly flawed compared to the originals. And that's only because I haven't done French since year 9 and detested it even then. With a GCSE in it you'd probably get by fine. You'll be busy, yes, but they design these courses with us in mind so I'm sure you'd be able to fit it in.

    If you're another historian I'm happy to answer your questions too

    With Latin I can guess/understand about half the words due to general vocabulary knowledge, even though I wasn't taught it, with Spanish it's 1 in 3 and with French it's 1 in 5. German? Zilch. Which is a shame, because a large branch of my family is German and quite a lot of my friends at Catz know it. And they occassionaly decide to have a conversation in it because they know I can't understand...
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    (Original post by Incarnadine91)
    With Latin I can guess/understand about half the words due to general vocabulary knowledge, even though I wasn't taught it, with Spanish it's 1 in 3 and with French it's 1 in 5. German? Zilch. Which is a shame, because a large branch of my family is German and quite a lot of my friends at Catz know it. And they occassionaly decide to have a conversation in it because they know I can't understand...
    Surely knowing English gives you around as much German as it does Latin? Depends on the topic, I guess.
 
 
 
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