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    (Original post by It could be lupus)
    Actually most of the drugs that are out there without a satisfactory mechanism of action would not pass drug trials today due to the fact that there is no satisfactory mechanism of action
    Seriously? Can you link me to somewhere that says this?

    If it's true, I'm irked. I don't really care if we don't yet know of a biologically plausible mechanism (at least not clinically... academically it's annoying!) providing that it's been proven to work empirically.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    No, this isn't the case. I will expand on it tomorrow if it is still going. Basically osteopathy is the less quackish alternative to chiropractering, which was invented as a business model by it's sharp-minded inventor.
    You're talking D.O.'s here I'm guessing?

    I know it's more than that, but thought that was the basis of it (my mother goes to see one, bad times). Look forward to the expansion on this in that case.
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    Seriously? Can you link me to somewhere that says this?

    If it's true, I'm irked. I don't really care if we don't yet know of a biologically plausible mechanism (at least not clinically... academically it's annoying!) providing that it's been proven to work empirically.
    I'm actually in the process of finding out a place that says this but I've been told on several occassions (by lecturers and one of my supervisors). They said it can be really annoying, especially considering the number of drugs for which no mechanisms are still known. Another thing to note is that paracetamol would never pass current drug trials due to its therapeutic index yet it is used all the time and can be bought over the counter
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    The whole no effort yet win thing is quite a big compliment imo
    Definitely, but he only scrapes through by doing as little as he does. If he put a bit more effort in and turned up to lectures I think he'd be a massive winner, though he's not that type of guy. he spent most of his first and second term in bed with my flatmate and was one of the guys who appeared in the daily mail with their trousers down... not what you'd call a keen student. Not that I'm any better, but he has more brains :p:
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    (Original post by Mushi_master)
    You're talking D.O.'s here I'm guessing?

    I know it's more than that, but thought that was the basis of it (my mother goes to see one, bad times). Look forward to the expansion on this in that case.
    Nope, we don't have D.O.s in the UK.
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    A patient I saw in my GPs came just to get an x-ray of his knee to show to his chiropractor. The GP gave it to him. Shouldn't they have paid for this, rather than getting it on the NHS, seeing as it was only going to be used by the chiropractor?
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Nope, we don't have D.O.s in the UK.
    I'm aware, I just assumed it may be a more recognised and regulated practice in the US with D.O.s.
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    digitalis, I like you.

    If complementary/alternative quack medicine worked, it would just be called medicine.

    Do you follow this stuff? It's almost a hobby of mine, and (sadly?) it almost has it's own scene (debunking it, not practicing it).
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    Suckers: How alternative medicine makes fools of us all is another good read in this area. Very critical it is.
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    (Original post by mrs_bellamy)
    A patient I saw in my GPs came just to get an x-ray of his knee to show to his chiropractor. The GP gave it to him. Shouldn't they have paid for this, rather than getting it on the NHS, seeing as it was only going to be used by the chiropractor?
    GP should have been strung up for unnecessary radiation exposure.
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    (Original post by Mushi_master)
    AFAIK Osteopathy involves 'manipulating the bones of the skull'.

    Erm, have you found these bones slide past each other easily/at all in the DR, I don't think so...

    And kudos to the quacktitioner hatin' in here.
    That's cranial osteopathy, which I agree does sound mental. And it's especially popular for babies - double mental.

    Standard osteopathy is a leetle less quacky; it's basically massage and joint manipulation. And (as I understand it) it is designed to treat muscle/joint problems, unlike chiroquacktors who claim to be able to treat your gallstones/heart failure/whatever by crunching your back. I've had osteopathy in the past and am fairly neutral about it tbh.
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    I've had osteopathy too and it wasn't too bad. The guy was fit...
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    one of my wisdom teech really hurts, I'm thinking of getting it extracted. Might go over to Kings and let a student dentist do it - free and cba to find a nhs dentist...Good plan or not??
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    one of my wisdom teech really hurts, I'm thinking of getting it extracted. Might go over to Kings and let a student dentist do it - free and cba to find a nhs dentist...Good plan or not??
    I don't even let trainee hairdressers cut my hair, nevermind someone not fully qualified pulling my teeth out.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    I don't even let trainee hairdressers cut my hair, nevermind someone not fully qualified pulling my teeth out.
    Well my thinking was, how different can it be to medical students doing stuff?
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    (Original post by Mushi_master)
    AFAIK Osteopathy involves 'manipulating the bones of the skull'.

    Erm, have you found these bones slide past each other easily/at all in the DR, I don't think so...

    And kudos to the quacktitioner hatin' in here.
    http://www.skepdic.com/osteopathy.html

    Andrew Taylor Still (1828-1917), a Civil War surgeon in the Union army, is credited with discovering osAndrew Taylor Stillteopathy as an alternative to the medical practices common in his day, practices which failed to save his three children from spinal meningitis. Still became convinced that he could cure diseases by shaking the body or manipulating the spine. In his autobiography, he says he could "shake a child and stop scarlet fever, croup, diphtheria, and cure whooping cough in three days by a wring of its neck" (Barrett). He also advocated clean living, including abstinence from alcohol and medically prescribed drugs. Surgery was to be avoided, if possible. Today, D.O.s (doctors of osteopathy) complement manipulation with standard medical methods of diagnosis and treatment, including recommending drug therapy and surgery if appropriate. D.O.s have four years of medical training at a college of osteopathic medicine and do a one-year internship in primary care. Some continue their education in an area of osteopathic specialization. Nevertheless, there has not been scientific validation of Still's theory of shaking and manipulating to remove obstructions.
    Not too sure how the field has evolved today.
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    Well my thinking was, how different can it be to medical students doing stuff?
    Maybe I'm biased because we aren't allowed to practice procedures (even venflons) on each other, but I don't think I'd trust another student to do anything to me...
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    (Original post by It could be lupus)
    That is a bit different. Acupuncture has been shown to have a greater effect than the placebo effect whereas homeopathy has the same or less than the placebo effect. Accupuncture is really one of the only justifiable alternative treatments
    As an aside, if you decide to go to an 'alternative' medical practice for PfP C, make sure you rip it to shreds in your write up or you'll potentially fail.
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    (Original post by SMed)
    digitalis, I like you.

    If complementary/alternative quack medicine worked, it would just be called medicine.

    Do you follow this stuff? It's almost a hobby of mine, and (sadly?) it almost has it's own scene (debunking it, not practicing it).
    Don't you be dissin' broscience.
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    I remember being taught that acupuncture does have some evidence base - homeopathy OBVIOUSLY doesn't - the whole point of it being based on water memory :rofl:.

    I wouldn't mix physical pressure/ stimulation of neurones with drinking water...

    Be careful not to be on a witch hunt - but equally don't just accept any old rubbish...
 
 
 
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