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    I'm in my third week of teaching at my first placement, week 1 was maths lessons every day, week 2 was literacy every day. And now it's maths and literacy every day so 3hr of teaching each day.
    Today I've had to take a day off due to a sickness bug, I was tempted to power throigh but I know it would only make it worse.
    First observation tomorrow - I'm really struggling to get decent amounts of work out of them. Year 5 are not my best age range.
    Can anyone give me tips on how to make the British empire exciting for a year 5 class?!
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    Had an awful year 7 lesson today. The whole thing was pretty much pointless until the last 10 minutes because I spent the majority of the lesson dealing with really annoying low-level misbehaviour. I think I used non-verbal communication really well though - crossing my arms and standing at the front of the room definitely had a much higher impact than me beginning to raise my voice. Didn't want to raise my voice so opted for the death stare (again)

    I think next lesson I'm going to take some time to make a proper seating plan in an attempt to learn some names and move the more disruptive pupils. Problem at the moment is that most of the loud and disruptive ones are at the back together, and all the quiet ones are at the front. Which will definitely need changing!

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    (Original post by bethanyrae)
    I'm in my third week of teaching at my first placement, week 1 was maths lessons every day, week 2 was literacy every day. And now it's maths and literacy every day so 3hr of teaching each day.
    Today I've had to take a day off due to a sickness bug, I was tempted to power throigh but I know it would only make it worse.
    First observation tomorrow - I'm really struggling to get decent amounts of work out of them. Year 5 are not my best age range.
    Can anyone give me tips on how to make the British empire exciting for a year 5 class?!
    for 1 lesson? what is it on? you could try hot seating a key person? chn almost always enjoy that!
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    First observed lesson done went fairly well on the whole - the teacher that observed me said my main positives were that my lesson was appropriate for a bottom set year 7, the starter linked to the rest of the lesson, my pupil inclusion was good with good plenary questions as well. She said I had a calming persona that rubbed off on the pupils.

    Areas for improvement - modelling and clear instructions. Absolutely agree - definitely need to be clearer about what I want them to do and give good examples beforehand. More praise for attempting an answer and not to answer for pupils at times.

    Behaviour was fine.

    I then did a starter for year 8 straight after which I felt went superbly and the mentor agreed - I was authoritative (surprised even myself. Raised my voice only once and I did it in such a way that I could see shock from some of the pupils) didn't talk over them and explained my expectations when someone is talking, that everyone must be quiet and listen.

    Really enjoyed it and feel more confident for tomorrow's full lesson with that class now. The starter was meant to be for tomorrow but my mentor and I agreed that because I'm giving them new seats and books I wouldn't have time so I'd rather get that done tomorrow so they can learn better through the coming months and I've already delivered the starter now, just today instead of tomorrow.

    Feeling positive now but know there's a lot I still need to work on.
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    I would suggest:

    -Get them to work out vocabulary themselves as much as possible - match-up activities like card sorts, sheets or powerpoints where they have to match things up, or TaskMagic if you have it are good for this.

    -Things where they have to all respond quickly, eg: to translate a phrase using the correct tense. Mini-whiteboards are really good for this, if you have access to them. Basically anything to stop them being lazy and making sure they're getting plenty of practice of key structures by drilling them repeatedly.

    -Lots of discussion of how to improve things, getting ideas from the class and adding to them to write a good sentence together.
    eg: Je joue au foot --> Can we add some extra detail? Time phrase? When? Who with? --> D'habitude je joue au foot avec mes copains apres le college. --> WHY? We need connectives... --> D'habitude je joue au foot avec mes amis apres le college, parce que c'est amusant et bon pour la sante. --> Other people's opinions? --> Cependant, ma mere pense que c'est une perte de temps et elle prefere la natation. --> Make a contrast/ use another tense --> Aujourd'hui, je n'ai pas joué au foot puisque j'étais fatigué.
    Obviously what you can include depends on where they're at with tenses, etc., but there's always something you can do to extend things and it helps them see how to improve their own writing.

    -Reading tasks where the initial task is a GCSE style question (eg: true or false/who does the statement apply to/short answers in English) and the extension task focuses on them finding good vocab/phrases in the text so they can use them in future.

    -Currently I'm doing a lot of work on tenses because my Y10s have specifically asked for it. So I've been doing things like match the time phrase to the correct tense, or find and correct the mistakes in a particular tense...

    Hope this gives you some ideas! Let me know if you need any help and I'll do my best, if I'm not drowning under my NQT workload too much!
    Thank you very much for the tips! They're really useful. Feel like I'm floundering at the moment but these have really given me some food for thought.
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    (Original post by Steveluis10)
    First observed lesson done went fairly well on the whole - the teacher that observed me said my main positives were that my lesson was appropriate for a bottom set year 7, the starter linked to the rest of the lesson, my pupil inclusion was good with good plenary questions as well. She said I had a calming persona that rubbed off on the pupils.

    Areas for improvement - modelling and clear instructions. Absolutely agree - definitely need to be clearer about what I want them to do and give good examples beforehand. More praise for attempting an answer and not to answer for pupils at times.

    Behaviour was fine.

    I then did a starter for year 8 straight after which I felt went superbly and the mentor agreed - I was authoritative (surprised even myself. Raised my voice only once and I did it in such a way that I could see shock from some of the pupils) didn't talk over them and explained my expectations when someone is talking, that everyone must be quiet and listen.

    Really enjoyed it and feel more confident for tomorrow's full lesson with that class now. The starter was meant to be for tomorrow but my mentor and I agreed that because I'm giving them new seats and books I wouldn't have time so I'd rather get that done tomorrow so they can learn better through the coming months and I've already delivered the starter now, just today instead of tomorrow.

    Feeling positive now but know there's a lot I still need to work on.
    Congratulations! That sounds really good And glad you've got your first observation over and completed, they get less scary each time.

    And hey, with teaching there's always a lot everyone needs to work on. It's a profession of constant self improvement. That's why PGCE is good practice for dealing with that and still learning to feel positively about yourself and your achievements!

    (Original post by outlaw-torn)
    Had an awful year 7 lesson today. The whole thing was pretty much pointless until the last 10 minutes because I spent the majority of the lesson dealing with really annoying low-level misbehaviour. I think I used non-verbal communication really well though - crossing my arms and standing at the front of the room definitely had a much higher impact than me beginning to raise my voice. Didn't want to raise my voice so opted for the death stare (again)

    I think next lesson I'm going to take some time to make a proper seating plan in an attempt to learn some names and move the more disruptive pupils. Problem at the moment is that most of the loud and disruptive ones are at the back together, and all the quiet ones are at the front. Which will definitely need changing!

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    I hate those lessons! It sounds like you're doing great at reflecting and thinking on what to do next about stuff. Not raising your voice sounds good... the death stare has the advantage of not talking over them, which is so hard to avoid but can give the impression that it's fine to talk while you are. One of my mentor teachers told me the best advice she got on her PGCE was, if you speak to get their attention, cut UNDER them (lower your pitch) rather than over, as it sounds more authoritative and serious and less frantic 'OH GOD WHAT DO I DO THEY AREN'T LISTENING!!!!!' lol.

    xxx
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    Fed up a week into my assessed block. Had one really good lesson observation with my year 7s, who I've been teaching for a while. Had a horrendous lesson with my year 8s, had to stop myself from crying in the feedback meeting. Don't think that would have reflected well on me as a resilient teacher, crying in front of HOD! Really struggling with modelling writing to the pupils. I'm secondary English schools direct by the way.
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    Fed up a week into my assessed block. Had one really good lesson observation with my year 7s, who I've been teaching for a while. Had a horrendous lesson with my year 8s, had to stop myself from crying in the feedback meeting. Don't think that would have reflected well on me as a resilient teacher, crying in front of HOD! Really struggling with modelling writing to the pupils. I'm secondary English schools direct by the way.
    I cried in front of my mentor (who was also the head of phase if that makes a difference). It was during feedback, because my phonics lesson went badly, but also just a general cry lol. It is a bit embarrassing but also inevitable. Remember the HOD probably cried many a time in their training and nqt year. It's high pressure, you have very little time for eating properly, sleeping etc, let alone spending time with friends or just relaxing at home. It's so stressful that it's very hard to cope with then having someone point out your flaws to your face! But there's absolutely nothing wrong with crying In front of a mentor. As long as you also show them that you understand the areas for improvement and have a plan for solving them.

    It will get better and better. Ok, the year 8 lesson was bad, but think of how much you can learn and take away from that, to try new things next time!

    Xxx

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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    Fed up a week into my assessed block. Had one really good lesson observation with my year 7s, who I've been teaching for a while. Had a horrendous lesson with my year 8s, had to stop myself from crying in the feedback meeting. Don't think that would have reflected well on me as a resilient teacher, crying in front of HOD! Really struggling with modelling writing to the pupils. I'm secondary English schools direct by the way.
    I'll also point out when my mentor saw me cry that prompted her to realise I needed more examples for phonics and we went through lots of stuff and I felt much better about it. I obviously hadn't quite got my needs clear on that occasion so getting upset actually had a positive outcome.

    Do you do shared writing to model? Not secondary myself but I will try to help if I can! Big if lol. What kind of level are the children at that you find modelling hard for?

    Xxx

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    Had an absolutely cracking week - The year 8 class I got observed in which I was dreading a bit went very well. My mentor said for a first observed lesson it was pretty damn good. Obviously not everything perfect, my resourcing was a slight issue (need to print off anything which can aid them when doing their work in any way) but she said my classroom management (thing I was most concerned about) was one of my biggest strengths, I managed to get them in a seating plan with no fuss. She also said my modelling on the board was a big plus and my time management also a strength. I didn't over-run at all but finished maybe a bit early if anything.

    Have so much confidence now but know there's loads I can still improve on.

    Lesson planning time for a few hours now I'm finding this year 7 class (see earlier post in this page) so hard to plan for because they're low set so need a lot of spoon feeding but also I find Newspaper Articles so dull so that doesn't really help.
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    Fed up a week into my assessed block. Had one really good lesson observation with my year 7s, who I've been teaching for a while. Had a horrendous lesson with my year 8s, had to stop myself from crying in the feedback meeting. Don't think that would have reflected well on me as a resilient teacher, crying in front of HOD! Really struggling with modelling writing to the pupils. I'm secondary English schools direct by the way.
    I cried probably about 10000000000000000 times* in front of my mentors. I think it annoyed them, but it is genuinely a coping mechanism for me (I cry fairly easily). Don't worry, just take the feedback and show them you can listen to the comments you get.

    *Disclaimer: numbers may be estimations
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    Sorry to hear that Shelly,

    What specifically was horrendous? Behaviour or are you finding it difficult to get across what it is you want them to learn? I'm doing secondary English PGCE so haven't been teaching solo for too long now but maybe I could give you some advice?
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    Just wanted to cut in to say, don't worry about planning. It does get easier with time. I used to spend 4 hours planning a lesson that would last 45 minutes - now I can plan a whole week within 2 hours!

    The key is to keep to a structure that has clear outcomes and objectives. As long as you've got those in, the rest of the plan will fall into place. Key vocab and resources are good to include too. Google "The 5 minute lesson plan" if you're struggling :-)
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    I've yet to start teaching. I feel like I'm way behind!
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    (Original post by Mr Advice)
    I've yet to start teaching. I feel like I'm way behind!
    Don't panic... That's just the way the uni have chosen to structure it. They will have based your lectures/workshops and professional development around teaching this way, as well as assignments. Use observation time wisely, it's like gold once you're fully qualified!!!

    Xxx

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    (Original post by Mr Advice)
    I've yet to start teaching. I feel like I'm way behind!
    Every course/school is different. I wouldn't worry about it! When you feel ready to teach, make sure your mentor knows this

    I felt behind before half term because I went to uni and loads of other people had been teaching full lessons already. Then I spoke to a few others who said they were still doing starters or observing, which made me feel a lot better!

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    (Original post by Mr Advice)
    I've yet to start teaching. I feel like I'm way behind!
    I was the same last year.

    At my university we had an observation week 5th-9th November then started teaching on the 12th, so I felt left behind reading what people elsewhere were up to.

    But everyone gets roughly the same number of teaching weeks across the course. I know people from some other universities got more time in uni in the middle of the course and at the end, whereas I think we only had one week in uni after we finished placement.

    And I'd definitely second what kpwxx said about observing - now I'm an NQT I really wish I had the chance to observe other teachers more, and it's almost impossible!

    I have the heaviest timetable in the department (I've got my NQT time - I teach 24 lessons out of a 30 period week - but the HoD and another member of staff have extra frees due to other responsibilities within the school, another is part-time, and another does one-to-one literacy support for some of their lessons) so there's never a time when I am free and other colleagues are teaching. I've done one observation where the school arranged cover, but I could really do with more at some point. I don't feel I know how people teach in this school, whereas before felt I knew what was expected.
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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    I'll also point out when my mentor saw me cry that prompted her to realise I needed more examples for phonics and we went through lots of stuff and I felt much better about it. I obviously hadn't quite got my needs clear on that occasion so getting upset actually had a positive outcome.

    Do you do shared writing to model? Not secondary myself but I will try to help if I can! Big if lol. What kind of level are the children at that you find modelling hard for?

    Xxx

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    Thanks for the advice. I feel a bit better after taking Saturday off to just hang out with friends. Yeah we are supposed to do supported writing, so the kids are meant to come up with some ideas and be contributing. I think anyway... I haven't really seen many examples of it and feel like I'm just kinda expected to know this stuff. They're mixed ability so some of them are extremely weak and some are very high level. It's tough to know how to pitch it.
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    (Original post by Steveluis10)
    Sorry to hear that Shelly,

    What specifically was horrendous? Behaviour or are you finding it difficult to get across what it is you want them to learn? I'm doing secondary English PGCE so haven't been teaching solo for too long now but maybe I could give you some advice?
    Behaviour was fine actually, which was one of the only strengths I had. I'm having trouble explaining myself clearly and modelling the work for them. I think it boils down to lack of confidence in me being able to do this so the lesson I planned was pretty rubbish. It also was probably rubbish because I was absolutely exhausted when I planned it... I know I can plan good lessons because my year 7 ones are always good and my mentor for them thinks I'm at a very good place with them having only taught two full lessons for them.
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    (Original post by Piggsil)
    I cried probably about 10000000000000000 times* in front of my mentors. I think it annoyed them, but it is genuinely a coping mechanism for me (I cry fairly easily). Don't worry, just take the feedback and show them you can listen to the comments you get.

    *Disclaimer: numbers may be estimations
    Thanks I am listening to comments and she was correct in everything she said about the lesson, I wish she hasn't kept repeating it though.
 
 
 
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