Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JAR12)
    Well I wasn't going to admit to that but same
    Love C&P - I wanted to tackle the Brothers Karamozav over Summer, but it's not happening. I know one of my college's tutors loves Dostoyevsky (and I think my other interview looked at us with disgust)!
    Anything you'd recommend once I get through CP? I feel I ought to devote some time to the classics since I'm not really doing anything in Berlin.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JAR12)
    What book are you using?
    I've found Oxford Take Off in Russian for a quarter of the price on another site, and it's in my library. The New Penguin Russian Course is the cheapest of this version but it looks good, but it's not available in my library. (Sorry for plaguing you with questions! Out of interest, why did you choose to learn Russian?)
    My reasons for wanting to learn aren't even any good - I'd like to read some of the books (19th/20th Century) in their original! Same with German... and that might be more 'useful'? Talk about tenuous

    I'm (hopefully) doing History & English so maybe trying to learn a language will stretch me even thinner! Still I don't like the idea of remaining monolingual, but I never liked French.
    I'm using this. It's gone up 11p since I bought it though...

    It seems quite good, despite the Cyrillic section being rather brief; two exercises and Dr. West is straight into LET'S DO RUSSIAN WOO! However, it's all very clear. I chose it over the Penguin Russian Course because of the negative reviews the NPRC got about dense, difficult chapters.

    I wanted to do Russian because I used to love the idea of learning a language. I did French from Year 7-9 and German in Year 9. In Year 9 my interest just tailed off; I hated the way languages were taught in school, and in German I had very little interest or motivation. I spent a year just copying the highly capable girl I sat next to.

    Russian is different than the 'vanilla' Romance languages. Different alphabet, little word similarity... And it sounds awesome. I bounced from wanting to do Russian to wanting to learn Arabic (Could be useful in the Army, no? ), but Oxford don't offer Arabic as a LASR course (Only OPAL, which I think would be too much of a commitment). I might not even do the LASR course and just self-teach, and get a girl I know who speaks Russian to help me out a bit
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JAR12)
    Oh, okay, thank you! I'll hopefully be a half-blood historian. :cool:
    I have a question for English but I suppose it applies to History too - on my reading lists it says it's usual (but not mandatory) for HENGers to take Old English Module, as opposed to Victorian for the first year. But I've been given a reading list for both, and the Victorian list is rather extensive! Do you know if I choose now, or try to read half from each?... When you choose modules, do you get 'tasters' of both or simply go straight into one, forgoing another?
    Erm, I don't know exactly about English but in History you pick your modules before the term in which you do them, without any 'taster' stuff. Because you're a joint school you might have to pick all your modules now, as opposed to one at a time - I know the Hist&Pol lot do - but either way you need to choose. There's only 8 weeks in a term, you need all the time you can get just to learn them on their own! Wait until you get your results/freshers pack, that should tell you more about the structure of the course than I can, it'll tell you when you need to choose by too. But I should start thinking about it, there must be one you prefer more than another? If you do Old English you aren't going to 'remain monolingual' - you need to translate the stuff To me it looks horrendous, but each to their own...

    I'm very jealous - I was thinking about applying for History & English, but was put off by the 12% aceptance rate. Nowadays I think any joint subject is a waste of good history, but that's because I've fallen in love with my work
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dbmag9)
    Anything you'd recommend once I get through CP? I feel I ought to devote some time to the classics since I'm not really doing anything in Berlin.
    In terms of Dostoyevsky the only other books I've read are The Double (a very... reflective piece in terms of identity and position in society, very enjoyable), Notes from the Underground (more dense and serious), and The Idiot (just as good as C&P). Other good Russian ones to think about are Gogol's Dead Souls and Tolstoy's short stories, all in a similar vein to C&P. They're the main Russian books I've read - I haven't read too many 'classics' either

    (Original post by micky022)
    I'm using this. It's gone up 11p since I bought it though...
    Thanks for all your help! Are the CDs useful?


    (Original post by Incarnadine91)
    If you do Old English you aren't going to 'remain monolingual' - you need to translate the stuff To me it looks horrendous, but each to their own...

    I'm very jealous - I was thinking about applying for History & English, but was put off by the 12% aceptance rate. Nowadays I think any joint subject is a waste of good history, but that's because I've fallen in love with my work
    Not too many native/living speakers though!
    I don't even know if I will take (or have to take) Anglo-Saxon modules so it's a teensy predicament!
    Other than the workload that's also a fear of mine, that either I'll prefer one side (probably History) or I'll feel like I've missed out. I should stop anticipating regrets already!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JAR12)
    In terms of Dostoyevsky the only other books I've read are The Double (a very... reflective piece in terms of identity and position in society, very enjoyable), Notes from the Underground (more dense and serious), and The Idiot (just as good as C&P). Other good Russian ones to think about are Gogol's Dead Souls and Tolstoy's short stories, all in a similar vein to C&P. They're the main Russian books I've read - I haven't read too many 'classics' either


    Thanks for all your help! Are the CDs useful?



    Not too many native/living speakers though!
    I don't even know if I will take (or have to take) Anglo-Saxon modules so it's a teensy predicament!
    Other than the workload that's also a fear of mine, that either I'll prefer one side (probably History) or I'll feel like I've missed out. I should stop anticipating regrets already!
    I'd say so, especially for the pronunciation and getting to grips with some of the words. So far all i can say is, "Your passport, please!"
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JAR12)
    Not too many native/living speakers though!
    I don't even know if I will take (or have to take) Anglo-Saxon modules so it's a teensy predicament!
    Other than the workload that's also a fear of mine, that either I'll prefer one side (probably History) or I'll feel like I've missed out. I should stop anticipating regrets already!
    You don't have to take them, no - joint schools don't even have the "one medieval, one early modern, one modern" restriction that we do - but you might consider it just because it links in so well with your Old English stuff. But then again you could just as easily do 19th century British history and your Victorian novels... It's your choice, in the end, colleges can only advise what they think you should take.

    The workload will be fine,as far as I know joint schools aren't measurably harder than single honours in that regard - you might have to do one or two more essays over the course of the term, but overall the two half-degrees add up to the same amount of work as the rest of us. I think - most of my experience with joint schools comes from a friend who does Hist&Pol, but it should be the same I imagine. They're not trying to kill you or anything!!! Just relax, and enjoy the fact you're doing a combination of degrees most people don't get the chance to
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by micky022)
    What subject are you doing?

    German is a horrid-sounding language, you could be calling someone beautiful and it sounds like you're threatening to torture them...
    I prescribe intensive listening of the St Matthew Passion on a loop, all three hours of it. There is no one on this planet who could emerge from that and still think German is an unpleasant language.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JAR12)
    What book are you using?
    I've found Oxford Take Off in Russian for a quarter of the price on another site, and it's in my library. The New Penguin Russian Course is the cheapest of this version but it looks good, but it's not available in my library. (Sorry for plaguing you with questions! Out of interest, why did you choose to learn Russian?)
    My reasons for wanting to learn aren't even any good - I'd like to read some of the books (19th/20th Century) in their original! Same with German... and that might be more 'useful'? Talk about tenuous

    I'm (hopefully) doing History & English so maybe trying to learn a language will stretch me even thinner! Still I don't like the idea of remaining monolingual, but I never liked French.


    Oh, okay, thank you! I'll hopefully be a half-blood historian. :cool:
    I have a question for English but I suppose it applies to History too - on my reading lists it says it's usual (but not mandatory) for HENGers to take Old English Module, as opposed to Victorian for the first year. But I've been given a reading list for both, and the Victorian list is rather extensive! Do you know if I choose now, or try to read half from each?... When you choose modules, do you get 'tasters' of both or simply go straight into one, forgoing another?
    I don't actually have an answer to your question, but as a straight English applicant who has to do both Old English and Victorian, I'd suggest to focus on Old English if that's what you are likely to choose (my reading list for that is much shorter) and maybe just try to read some of the Victorian stuff? Just a guess if your Victorian list is anything like mine/other people I've heard of, it would probably take ages to try and do both!

    Oh, and on the languages note, I started learning Italian because I wanted to understand bits of Dante! And I can't decide whether to continue teaching myself or to do a course.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JAR12)
    In terms of Dostoyevsky the only other books I've read are The Double (a very... reflective piece in terms of identity and position in society, very enjoyable), Notes from the Underground (more dense and serious), and The Idiot (just as good as C&P). Other good Russian ones to think about are Gogol's Dead Souls and Tolstoy's short stories, all in a similar vein to C&P. They're the main Russian books I've read - I haven't read too many 'classics' either
    Thanks, I'll come back to this post once I get through CP.

    (Original post by shinobi93)
    Oh, and on the languages note, I started learning Italian because I wanted to understand bits of Dante! And I can't decide whether to continue teaching myself or to do a course.
    Italian is so beautiful, though it's below French, Russian and Spanish on my 'languages I want to learn' list. I started reading Inferno (in translation) ages ago but never finished it. I can still remember "lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch'intrante", although there are probably some mistakes there.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by micky022)
    German is a horrid-sounding language, you could be calling someone beautiful and it sounds like you're threatening to torture them...
    I personally think German's a bit like playing the violin... beginners sound awful, but after that it's rather nice actually
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by laura_bird88)
    I personally think German's a bit like playing the violin... beginners sound awful, but after that it's rather nice actually
    I think I was tainted by being in a class of beginners a few years ago I can say kugelschreiber though!

    What subject is your offer for?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dbmag9)
    Italian is so beautiful, though it's below French, Russian and Spanish on my 'languages I want to learn' list. I started reading Inferno (in translation) ages ago but never finished it. I can still remember "lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch'intrante", although there are probably some mistakes there.
    Its beauty is the other reason I chose it. Just reading Inferno aloud, even without knowing what you're saying, sounds wonderful.

    I'd love to learn Russian, but that's mainly because I love Russian literature.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Oh yeah, to add to what I mentioned earlier to whoever, the bookshop also had Carmina Burana in side-by-side original (Latin and old German) and German. Mediaeval Latin drinking songs are pretty epic. Reclam (the publishing house) is completely amazing.

    (Original post by laura_bird88)
    I personally think German's a bit like playing the violin... beginners sound awful, but after that it's rather nice actually
    That's true of any language I can think of though; people attempting French with a really English accent is just as horrible.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Incarnadine91)
    Just relax, and enjoy the fact you're doing a combination of degrees most people don't get the chance to
    I count my blessings


    (Original post by shinobi93)
    I don't actually have an answer to your question, but as a straight English applicant who has to do both Old English and Victorian, I'd suggest to focus on Old English if that's what you are likely to choose (my reading list for that is much shorter) and maybe just try to read some of the Victorian stuff?.
    You're quite right. I'll have to choose then. I can always read Victorian in my own time!

    I'd love to learn Russian, but that's mainly because I love Russian literature
    :ditto:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by micky022)
    I think I was tainted by being in a class of beginners a few years ago I can say kugelschreiber though!

    What subject is your offer for?
    History I already know yours is law from my extensive stalking of this thread
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dbmag9)
    Oh yeah, to add to what I mentioned earlier to whoever, the bookshop also had Carmina Burana in side-by-side original (Latin and old German) and German. Mediaeval Latin drinking songs are pretty epic. Reclam (the publishing house) is completely amazing.


    That's true of any language I can think of though; people attempting French with a really English accent is just as horrible.
    I think that leans more towards humorous though, German and violin can have the same grating quality to begin with. Pretty much why I gave up both quickly to spare those around me...

    Edit: I will try to remember to multi-quote in future :/
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Incarnadine91)
    I think Latin translations are easier for me, even though I've never studied it in my life, because as you read it it sounds so awesome - like a magic spell
    Quoting this again because I looked up some of Carmina Burana and couldn't resist. You want stuff that sounds like a spell? Have a go at this, and pretend it's not actually a drinking song.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by laura_bird88)
    History I already know yours is law from my extensive stalking of this thread
    Haha as long as it remains thread stalking and not mysterious strangers in my garden at 3AM Have you got a reading list yet? I haven't, I feel purposeless
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by micky022)
    Haha as long as it remains thread stalking and not mysterious strangers in my garden at 3AM Have you got a reading list yet? I haven't, I feel purposeless
    Teaching yourself Russian seems a good enough task!

    I do indeed, though I got it the day before a 2 week holiday, so spent the whole time anxious to come home to the books I'd hastily ordered. I did, however, use the time to read the stack of novels I want to read before Oxford, I think I'll stick to plays and poems once there.

    As for actual History reading, I chose a period of History I knew next to nothing about (1685-1830), so have had to do a lot of basics before really delving into the books properly. Should begin to make headway tomorrow...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by laura_bird88)
    Teaching yourself Russian seems a good enough task!

    I do indeed, though I got it the day before a 2 week holiday, so spent the whole time anxious to come home to the books I'd hastily ordered. I did, however, use the time to read the stack of novels I want to read before Oxford, I think I'll stick to plays and poems once there.

    As for actual History reading, I chose a period of History I knew next to nothing about (1685-1830), so have had to do a lot of basics before really delving into the books properly. Should begin to make headway tomorrow...
    Hopefully I'll be reasonable at it by October haha. Ah, I only took one book on holiday last year. I generally dislike holiday books, they're usually trashy. Right now I'm reading Clausewitz's On War, Plato's The Republic, and I tried some Nietzsche but the man's style is like porridge. I'm unsure of the benefits of a reading list for Law; if it's all primer/background stuff I should be ok without it, having done Law at A-Level.

    What happens from 1685 to 1830? Is that like the Jacobite times?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.