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    (Original post by jenny18)
    I'm the only one from my school who got an offer, so it's all down to me. Well, i look forward to (hopefully) meeting you in October. Just as a matter of interest, how many medical students will ther be in our year at Lincoln? There's meant to be 12 English people, but i've heard somewhere that there's only 8.

    Throwing a similar question out to everyone, what class sizes are you expecting? How different is that from what you're used to. I went to a private school where my biggest class was 10 and my smallest 3. Are people looking forward to the small classes? Or is that a lot of individual pressure??
    I'm not too sure how many there are in a year, but I know that we get most of our teaching as a whole year. As for class sizes though, I know that we do some stuff in our college groups, tutorials and stuff; I guess that those classes would probably be about the same as what I'm used to at my secondary school, which wasn't private but was scottish (and therefore pretty good). A lot of my classes were ones with few candidates doing them anyway - there were only about half a dozen in three of my four Advanced Highers, and the other maybe had about 18 folks in. (The higher I was doing had maybe two dozen people in though). I'm kind of looking forward to the small class sizes, it means that you get more time to discuss things and ask questions and stuff .
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    (Original post by micky022)
    Hopefully I'll be reasonable at it by October haha. Ah, I only took one book on holiday last year. I generally dislike holiday books, they're usually trashy. Right now I'm reading Clausewitz's On War, Plato's The Republic, and I tried some Nietzsche but the man's style is like porridge. I'm unsure of the benefits of a reading list for Law; if it's all primer/background stuff I should be ok without it, having done Law at A-Level.

    What happens from 1685 to 1830? Is that like the Jacobite times?
    You don't have to read trashy 'holiday' books on holiday you know, they don't confiscate the rest at security. I managed to smuggle some Forster and Lawrence out the country with me I want to read more philosophy but never get round to it, I suppose I don't know where to start.

    The course features the Glorious Revolution, Whigs and Tories, Walpole, Pitt, the emerging of the industrial revolution... all sorts, including Jacobitism.
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    (Original post by laura_bird88)
    You don't have to read trashy 'holiday' books on holiday you know, they don't confiscate the rest at security. I managed to smuggle some Forster and Lawrence out the country with me I want to read more philosophy but never get round to it, I suppose I don't know where to start.
    This is why Kindles are awesome. Not only do you not have to carry the bloody things, you can get a lot of them for free.

    And I'm taking this opportunity to shamelessly plug the list of philosophy books I made out of a thread somewhere.
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    (Original post by laura_bird88)
    You don't have to read trashy 'holiday' books on holiday you know, they don't confiscate the rest at security. I managed to smuggle some Forster and Lawrence out the country with me I want to read more philosophy but never get round to it, I suppose I don't know where to start.

    The course features the Glorious Revolution, Whigs and Tories, Walpole, Pitt, the emerging of the industrial revolution... all sorts, including Jacobitism.
    We do, my dad is awful for them. His whole shelf is crap chain novels where the protagonists save the world on a daily basis I like Stoicism; Epictetus' Discourses and Enchiridion are easy to read and fairly cheap

    Ah, sounds interesting. History was my second love at school (Formerly first, but then I had an affair with Law)
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    (Original post by dbmag9)
    This is why Kindles are awesome. Not only do you not have to carry the bloody things, you can get a lot of them for free.

    And I'm taking this opportunity to shamelessly plug the list of philosophy books I made out of a thread somewhere.
    Haha well, I'm afraid I'm odd and spent a good proportion of my time scouring charity and antique shops for incredibly cheap books, so it's generally okay. Admittedly I did add 5kg to my suitcase just in books...

    And thanks for the link, I'll try to check some of those out...
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    (Original post by micky022)
    We do, my dad is awful for them. His whole shelf is crap chain novels where the protagonists save the world on a daily basis I like Stoicism; Epictetus' Discourses and Enchiridion are easy to read and fairly cheap

    Ah, sounds interesting. History was my second love at school (Formerly first, but then I had an affair with Law)
    Haha well my boyfriend will only read books featuring apaches, so I can imagine!

    History was the obvious option for me, particularly after a horrendous week at an archaeological dig fully ruled out that option.

    I'm afraid Law is something I know truly nothing about.
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    (Original post by laura_bird88)
    Haha well, I'm afraid I'm odd and spent a good proportion of my time scouring charity and antique shops for incredibly cheap books, so it's generally okay. Admittedly I did add 5kg to my suitcase just in books...

    And thanks for the link, I'll try to check some of those out...
    Sounds like a fun hobby. When I was in Paris I was very tempted to find something leather-bound from the bouquinistes to buy but didn't find anything that looked cool and I genuinely wanted to read. But the weight of books does get to be an issue for travel that's not just dragging a suitcase to a hotel and back.

    No worries; if you read anything that's not commented on (or isn't in the list) add your thoughts.
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    (Original post by laura_bird88)
    Haha well my boyfriend will only read books featuring apaches, so I can imagine!

    History was the obvious option for me, particularly after a horrendous week at an archaeological dig fully ruled out that option.

    I'm afraid Law is something I know truly nothing about.
    The Native Americans or the helicopters?

    What happened at the dig like?
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    4 days. I'm sorry. But now the number of days can be counted on the fingers of one hand (excluding thumb).

    On another note, in the earlier sentence I was very very tempted to write the word "discluding" instead of "excluding". Has anyone else noticed that since you have said to family/friends that you have an offer from Oxford that they pull you up on grammar and pronunciation all the time?? For me it's doubly bad, as an English student, but is this the same for everyone? Is anything stupid that you say, even if there are extenuating circumstances, ruthlessly mocked and quoted back at you when you try and say something intelligent again to redeem yourself??
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    (Original post by micky022)
    The Native Americans or the helicopters?

    What happened at the dig like?
    The helicopters, sadly. I thought he meant the former at first, as I think that's the most common useage of the word, but apparently not...

    Well, it was just not what I'd expected I suppose. A lot more pure physical labour, I spent 90% of the week just shovelling dirt. I found a lot, sure, but after 50 pieces of broken pottery you don't get too excited anymore. Even when you found a 'small find' (i.e. not a bone, or pot) that was mostly just irritating, as you have to catalogue the bloody thing with incredible precision.

    In conclusion, it basically had the bits of science I hate, plus the bits of history I hate. Though I'm still proud of the Roman brooch I found...
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    Btw, this has sort of been discussed, but mainly among English students: for history reading this summer, what sort of notes are people planning to take? And what volume?

    Feel free to answer if you're a similar subject btw, I just think note taking is different in English, so thought I'd ask.
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    (Original post by laura_bird88)
    The helicopters, sadly. I thought he meant the former at first, as I think that's the most common useage of the word, but apparently not...

    Well, it was just not what I'd expected I suppose. A lot more pure physical labour, I spent 90% of the week just shovelling dirt. I found a lot, sure, but after 50 pieces of broken pottery you don't get too excited anymore. Even when you found a 'small find' (i.e. not a bone, or pot) that was mostly just irritating, as you have to catalogue the bloody thing with incredible precision.

    In conclusion, it basically had the bits of science I hate, plus the bits of history I hate. Though I'm still proud of the Roman brooch I found...
    So it was ****ter than Time Team?

    We did a pretend dig at the local Roman fort in year six. It was basically a sandpit with skulls in it
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    (Original post by micky022)
    So it was ****ter than Time Team?

    We did a pretend dig at the local Roman fort in year six. It was basically a sandpit with skulls in it
    Where I did my dig (Silchester, if you're interested) there was a little kiddy sandpit right next to the real excavations. It was actually filled with real finds though. Basically, if someone doesn't label something properly, which exactly where it came from, what depth etc. the find is basically worthless, no matter how cool it is So the kids got some pretty good stuff.
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    (Original post by laura_bird88)
    Where I did my dig (Silchester, if you're interested) there was a little kiddy sandpit right next to the real excavations. It was actually filled with real finds though. Basically, if someone doesn't label something properly, which exactly where it came from, what depth etc. the find is basically worthless, no matter how cool it is So the kids got some pretty good stuff.
    Cataloguing is that detailed? Jesus.
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    (Original post by jenny18)
    4 days. I'm sorry. But now the number of days can be counted on the fingers of one hand (excluding thumb).

    On another note, in the earlier sentence I was very very tempted to write the word "discluding" instead of "excluding". Has anyone else noticed that since you have said to family/friends that you have an offer from Oxford that they pull you up on grammar and pronunciation all the time?? For me it's doubly bad, as an English student, but is this the same for everyone? Is anything stupid that you say, even if there are extenuating circumstances, ruthlessly mocked and quoted back at you when you try and say something intelligent again to redeem yourself??
    Not just grammar and pronunciation, but my friends pick out anything I do/say which doesn't seem "intelligent enough" and say 'What would Oxford think?!'. I think it's because they no longer mock me for being a geek, so instead they mock me for not being enough of one!

    Oh, and I just fell in love with Google Books. It has the Old English translations book I needed, which is over £20 to buy
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    (Original post by laura_bird88)
    Btw, this has sort of been discussed, but mainly among English students: for history reading this summer, what sort of notes are people planning to take? And what volume?

    Feel free to answer if you're a similar subject btw, I just think note taking is different in English, so thought I'd ask.
    Well since I'm translating some French for the foreign text, I'm making lots of notes, as well as scribbling all over the book itself, to the point where I can barely read the original text. My other books haven't arrived yet, but from the reading list, Professor Brockliss (Magdalen) said he hopes we have a confident background knowledge before the course starts, which doesn't sound too ominous, so I'm slightly relaxed about that.
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    Just think, Oxford got our results today and has decided whether not we've got in :afraid:
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    (Original post by soutioirsim)
    Just think, Oxford got our results today and has decided whether not we've got in :afraid:
    I thought it was Monday?
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    (Original post by micky022)
    I thought it was Monday?
    Apparently all unis recieve our results today and then have until thursday to decide whether or not to accept us
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    (Original post by soutioirsim)
    Apparently all unis recieve our results today and then have until thursday to decide whether or not to accept us
    Pre-emptive begging phonecalls anyone?
 
 
 
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