Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sat0ri)
    How did they phrase the email? I was told something very similar, but was told "the majority of decisions will be made in June". So my understanding is that June is simply when you would hear one way or the other (rejection or acceptance). I'm thinking, maybe if they phrased it a certain way, it might be indicative. However, I think it it's most likely does not have any prognostic value.
    They just wrote something along the lines of "applicants will be informed by June so that those successful can take up their places in October".
    I'm just wondering if the fact that they are looking at my applications necessarily means that I was shortlisted by my department...
    Maybe the Trust looks at all applications submitted via GRADSAF, regardless of the departments' recommendations?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AnthApplicant23)
    They just wrote something along the lines of "applicants will be informed by June so that those successful can take up their places in October".
    I'm just wondering if the fact that they are looking at my applications necessarily means that I was shortlisted by my department...
    Maybe the Trust looks at all applications submitted via GRADSAF, regardless of the departments' recommendations?
    My email contained that same phrase, verbatim. I think that trust email address might even be automated. When I wrote my email to cambridge trust, I asked about an external scholarship that is technically an exchange program (which the trust website says will preclude you from consideration). The email addressed none of these concerns and instead had that verbatim quote in it. So I think the emails are automated, or at best just the responses are pre-written with FAQ-type answers and email inquiries are sorted into different hats. Obviously, I could easily be wrong here, but again (1) I got that exact response and (2) the response seemed a bit irrelevant to my question. I simply don't think it hold any prognostic value (good or bad).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am still 'under consideration by degree committee' for an MPhil in Economic and Social History after over two months since my application was submitted.

    Shall I just continue to wait or email admissions?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AnthApplicant23)
    They just wrote something along the lines of "applicants will be informed by June so that those successful can take up their places in October".
    I'm just wondering if the fact that they are looking at my applications necessarily means that I was shortlisted by my department...
    Maybe the Trust looks at all applications submitted via GRADSAF, regardless of the departments' recommendations?
    I believe you have to be shortlisted to be considered, but I could be wrong. I always find it best to ring and ask. With Gates, I rang and they told me that I was shortlisted but unsuccessful for interview. I then received a scholarship from the Cambridge Trust which my department recommended me for. Give them a ring and see if you can determine the position of your application. It can't hurt!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pierpasolini)
    I am still 'under consideration by degree committee' for an MPhil in Economic and Social History after over two months since my application was submitted.

    Shall I just continue to wait or email admissions?
    My sources in the History Faculty tell me that one of the main academics associated with that MPhil has been quite preoccupied with some family issues over the past few weeks, so that may be slowing things down a bit since they won't be reviewing applications as efficiently. I'd wait a bit longer before contacting them
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Just got rejected by my second college choice - not even 24 hours after being rejected by my first choice.

    Any idea what I can expect now?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gutenberg)
    My sources in the History Faculty tell me that one of the main academics associated with that MPhil has been quite preoccupied with some family issues over the past few weeks, so that may be slowing things down a bit since they won't be reviewing applications as efficiently. I'd wait a bit longer before contacting them
    Thanks for your help.

    I'll carry on waiting then.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pierpasolini)
    Thanks for your help.

    I'll carry on waiting then.
    No worries. I'm sure they'll get back to you before too long!
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pierpasolini)
    I am still 'under consideration by degree committee' for an MPhil in Economic and Social History after over two months since my application was submitted.

    Shall I just continue to wait or email admissions?
    I'm at the same stage for the MPhil in Early Modern History. Think we just have to carry on waiting, haven't heard of anybody yet who has got an offer on either of these two courses.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SEM94)
    I'm at the same stage for the MPhil in Early Modern History. Think we just have to carry on waiting, haven't heard of anybody yet who has got an offer on either of these two courses.
    I actually haven't seen anyone else on this thread who has applied to Econ and Social.

    I've also got offers from other universities, who want a response relatively soon, so it's a difficult situation.

    Hopefully we will both have an answer soon.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone. I am accepted by Gonville & Caius College. Does anyone have information about this college? Where are the graduate students usually accomodated? Thanks in advance.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by vobll)
    Hi everyone. I am accepted by Gonville & Caius College. Does anyone have information about this college? Where are the graduate students usually accomodated? Thanks in advance.
    From what I remember from friends in Caius talking about their accommodation, I think most (if not all) of it will be in shared houses - I don't think they have any halls or dorm-style accommodation. A few of the houses are in the general area of the University Library/Sidgwick Site (one friend lived on Grange Road, near Selwyn). Others are near Hughes Hall, in the surrounding residential streets. Neither of those options are very far from town at all. If you're going to be based in the Sidgwick site, or using the UL a large amount, then the ones on Grange Road would probably be good; equally, the ones near Hughes Hall/Parker's Piece would be convenient for the Engineering department, New Museums site, Downing site etc.

    I have no idea about costs or anything like that I'm afraid, but most of the Caians seemed happy enough with their accommodation, plus I think they say they can usually house you for three years, which is handy.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gutenberg)
    From what I remember from friends in Caius talking about their accommodation, I think most (if not all) of it will be in shared houses - I don't think they have any halls or dorm-style accommodation. A few of the houses are in the general area of the University Library/Sidgwick Site (one friend lived on Grange Road, near Selwyn). Others are near Hughes Hall, in the surrounding residential streets. Neither of those options are very far from town at all. If you're going to be based in the Sidgwick site, or using the UL a large amount, then the ones on Grange Road would probably be good; equally, the ones near Hughes Hall/Parker's Piece would be convenient for the Engineering department, New Museums site, Downing site etc.

    I have no idea about costs or anything like that I'm afraid, but most of the Caians seemed happy enough with their accommodation, plus I think they say they can usually house you for three years, which is handy.
    Thanks a lot. This is very helpful informaton.

    By "shared houses", do you mean a shared house with common living room/kitchen but with separate and individiaul bedrooms? Or do you mean a house where two or three people share a single bedroom?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by vobll)
    Thanks a lot. This is very helpful informaton.

    By "shared houses", do you mean a shared house with common living room/kitchen but with separate and individiaul bedrooms? Or do you mean a house where two or three people share a single bedroom?
    A shared house would mean shared kitchen/living room, but then each person would have their own bedroom. If there were two or three people sharing, it wouldn't be a single bedroom anymore In the shared houses provided by my college, each bedroom had a lock on the door, so other people in the house couldn't access your room if you didn't want them to.
    Usually bathrooms are shared too in these kinds of houses.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gutenberg)
    A shared house would mean shared kitchen/living room, but then each person would have their own bedroom. If there were two or three people sharing, it wouldn't be a single bedroom anymore In the shared houses provided by my college, each bedroom had a lock on the door, so other people in the house couldn't access your room if you didn't want them to.
    Usually bathrooms are shared too in these kinds of houses.
    Thank you very much.

    I think you are right

    Indeed, provided that the bedrooms are large enough, I think a shared house may not have any disadvantage compared to a "unshared house" (sorry for my poor wording, I am not familiar with these terms since I am not native). Do you think these shared houses have any drawback?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by vobll)
    Thank you very much.

    I think you are right

    Indeed, provided that the bedrooms are large enough, I think a shared house may not have any disadvantage compared to a "unshared house" (sorry for my poor wording, I am not familiar with these terms since I am not native). Do you think these shared houses have any drawback?
    The bedrooms will likely vary somewhat in size. It has been my experience that a lot of college 'shared house' accommodation is essentially previous family homes that were bought, and in some cases converted/extended for occupation by students, so you'll have a lot of variety in terms of rooms. Some people will have a large room because it used to be the 'master' bedroom of a family home, while someone else will have a smaller room in the same house. Many colleges will acknowledge that in their rents though, with smaller rooms costing less. Further, I've never been in an unbelievably tiny room - the vast majority of colleges furnish their rooms with single beds, a desk & chair, wardrobe and other storage, so they need to be a certain minimum size just to fit all of that!

    The big drawback tends to be, essentially, that you are living with other people Some people are messy, or noisy, or keep very strange hours and since you all live together, that can negatively affect the other people living in the house. I've also had experience with houses where extra bedrooms were created by putting up partition walls, to create two rooms where previously it had been one, and so the soundproofing is practically non-existent. Many of the 'problems' I've encountered have been very common to all shared housing: people being messy/not washing up after themselves, being noisy, 'borrowing' food from the fridge, occasionally having to wait to use the shower. But really, these are issues you'd likely have in any kind of shared accommodation, it's not unique to Cambridge graduate accommodation!
    That said, my experience in the shared houses I've lived in while in Cambridge have generally been very good, and I've rarely had a serious problem with either the accommodation itself, or the people I lived with. You're all adults, so if someone is causing an issue then simply talk to them about it in a calm manner.

    With all of that being said, shared accommodation is pretty much the only option for most students in Cambridge, unless you're very independently wealthy. The cost of renting an apartment or house privately (i.e. not a college-owned property) to live alone would be astronomical, so the vast, vast majority of people share accommodation, whether college-owned or private.

    I don't think you need worry too much about it. If you arrive having some idea of what to expect, and are courteous and considerate, you'll be absolutely fine in shared accommodation. It's also a great way to make friends among people in your college: many of my closest friends in Cambridge are people I lived with at one time or another
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gutenberg)
    The bedrooms will likely vary somewhat in size. It has been my experience that a lot of college 'shared house' accommodation is essentially previous family homes that were bought, and in some cases converted/extended for occupation by students, so you'll have a lot of variety in terms of rooms. Some people will have a large room because it used to be the 'master' bedroom of a family home, while someone else will have a smaller room in the same house. Many colleges will acknowledge that in their rents though, with smaller rooms costing less. Further, I've never been in an unbelievably tiny room - the vast majority of colleges furnish their rooms with single beds, a desk & chair, wardrobe and other storage, so they need to be a certain minimum size just to fit all of that!

    The big drawback tends to be, essentially, that you are living with other people Some people are messy, or noisy, or keep very strange hours and since you all live together, that can negatively affect the other people living in the house. I've also had experience with houses where extra bedrooms were created by putting up partition walls, to create two rooms where previously it had been one, and so the soundproofing is practically non-existent. Many of the 'problems' I've encountered have been very common to all shared housing: people being messy/not washing up after themselves, being noisy, 'borrowing' food from the fridge, occasionally having to wait to use the shower. But really, these are issues you'd likely have in any kind of shared accommodation, it's not unique to Cambridge graduate accommodation!
    That said, my experience in the shared houses I've lived in while in Cambridge have generally been very good, and I've rarely had a serious problem with either the accommodation itself, or the people I lived with. You're all adults, so if someone is causing an issue then simply talk to them about it in a calm manner.

    With all of that being said, shared accommodation is pretty much the only option for most students in Cambridge, unless you're very independently wealthy. The cost of renting an apartment or house privately (i.e. not a college-owned property) to live alone would be astronomical, so the vast, vast majority of people share accommodation, whether college-owned or private.

    I don't think you need worry too much about it. If you arrive having some idea of what to expect, and are courteous and considerate, you'll be absolutely fine in shared accommodation. It's also a great way to make friends among people in your college: many of my closest friends in Cambridge are people I lived with at one time or another
    Gutenberg, this is so helpful. I really appreciate your help.

    I understand what you mean. Indeed, as an Erasmus student 3 years ago in a European country, I lived in a shared house which was almost exactly as you described, and there were some people having parties until 5.00 AM while I was trying to sleep or study for an exam. The mess and noise were also problems at that time. However, I hope the people I will live with at Cambridge will be a lot better.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by vobll)
    Gutenberg, this is so helpful. I really appreciate your help.

    I understand what you mean. Indeed, as an Erasmus student 3 years ago in a European country, I lived in a shared house which was almost exactly as you described, and there were some people having parties until 5.00 AM while I was trying to sleep or study for an exam. The mess and noise were also problems at that time. However, I hope the people I will live with at Cambridge will be a lot better.
    No problem.

    I can't promise there weren't be problems with mess or occasional noise, but I haven't had too many problems with parties until 5am in graduate housing Plus if you're in college-owned accommodation, you can complain to the college porters
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Wow looks like I have an interview! would anyone like to comment on how their postgrad interview went? Science related field
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JmXXX)
    Wow looks like I have an interview! would anyone like to comment on how their postgrad interview went? Science related field
    My PhD interview was pretty standard I think. Panel interview with three academics, one of whom was the head of the department. They asked about my current research, basically probing my knowledge of what I had done, asking what I had achieved etc. From there they asked about what research I wanted to conduct during my PhD and how I would achieve what i set out to do.

    I then had another interview with the funding committee who went through my transcript and basically ticked competencies off of a list.
 
 
 

University open days

  • University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Days - Exeter Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 24 Oct '18
  • University of Bradford
    Faculty of Health Studies Postgraduate
    Wed, 24 Oct '18
  • Northumbria University
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 24 Oct '18
Poll
Who is most responsible for your success at university

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.