Maths Uni Chat Watch

Simplicity
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#241
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#241
(Original post by DeanK22)
The people who actually make informed decisions about potential risks are are good at maths with a first in physics / maths from a top 5 uni [but preferably, Oxbridge]. They don't leave mathematical decisions to non mathehmaticians when quite literally billions of pouds are involved.



LOLLLLLL ur lectrer iz da thikest u shud get ur boyz to go medieval on his ass

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As c a real number is less than 0 -c is clearly postive and so a(-c) < b(-c) as order is compatible with multiplication by a real number greater than zero, that is x<y, z > 0 then xz < yz. Order is also compatible with addition, that is x < y implies x+z < y+z. As this is the case we can add (ac+bc) to out previous established inequality, -ac < -bc and the result follows
A blogger did comment about once you do banking your not a mathematician anymore but a banker. Its just weird how a lot of banks put lots of money on stuff that is risky like sub prime mortages and what not.

According to his uni page his job is setting fire to stuff and then trying to model it with mathematics. Which, sounds like a pretty fun job. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/7532024.stm the last person in this.
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Swayum
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#242
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#242
(Original post by Simplicity)
Well, statistically the top bankers tend to come from LSE and places like Oxford and Cambridge. I will post you an article about a mathematician blaming economist for not understanding the maths they use to do stupid risks.

They don't do straight maths at LSE, I have checked. Unless they have changed this in the last three months. I was under the impression that people doing a joint do just applied maths in a pretty unrigor way. I don't think they teach physicist real maths as I heard Richard Feynman say some shocking things about maths in one of his bopoks.

Hmm. Well, I know game theory is popular with economics. When do you get taught that?
Many people in the more quantitative positions have PhDs in maths... and are often graduates of Cambridge maths. I'll give you, although admittedly an extreme example, of one person:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Racing-Towar.../dp/0956256600

"Jan Sramek is a finalist at the London School of Economics, joining Goldman Sachs as an Emerging Markets trader in July 2009. He studied Mathematics at Trinity College, Cambridge before transferring into 2nd year of BSc Mathematics & Economics at the LSE to work part-time in the City of London.

Over the last five years, he broke the British A-level record by scoring 10 As and 3 Distinctions at A-level/S-level, was named Olympic Hope in handball and has been awarded almost £100,000 in scholarships by academic and financial institutions. He has worked or interned in trading and research at some of the world's leading investment banks (Goldman Sachs, Barclays Capital, UBS and Deutsche Bank) and hedge funds (Marshall Wace Asset Management and AKO Capital). Jan has been named a `wildcard entry' onto the nomination list of the Top 100 Rising Stars of European Financial Markets by Financial News, selected as One To Watch by university peers and been interviewed by CNN and several national newspapers.

Jan has founded and run four companies involved in social networking, graduate recruitment, West End night-club promotion and university admissions training. He has also founded a successful charity focusing on levelling out the playing field for applicants to Oxford and Cambridge. He is 22 years old."

This is only someone who's just graduated. People in higher positions have more qualifications (which they get later on in their careers).

Anyway, game theory is a third year topic at LSE and LSE's supposed to be the place to be for game theory - there's very strong departmental interest in it, to the point that they've just hired new guys to broaden the department's interests. Can't say I'm interested in it though.
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harr
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#243
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#243
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/member.php?u=28625
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Hedgeman49
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#244
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#244
(Original post by Swayum)
Anyway, game theory is a third year topic at LSE and LSE's supposed to be the place to be for game theory - there's very strong departmental interest in it, to the point that they've just hired new guys to broaden the department's interests. Can't say I'm interested in it though.
You should be interested! Did a summer school in the USA on game theory - really interesting stuff. If you have time check out a book called "Game Theory and Strategy" by Philip Straffin, it gives a fairly broad and simple introduction to the field.
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Simplicity
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#245
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#245
(Original post by Swayum)
Many people in the more quantitative positions have PhDs in maths... and are often graduates of Cambridge maths. I'll give you, although admittedly an extreme example, of one person:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Racing-Towar.../dp/0956256600

"Jan Sramek is a finalist at the London School of Economics, joining Goldman Sachs as an Emerging Markets trader in July 2009. He studied Mathematics at Trinity College, Cambridge before transferring into 2nd year of BSc Mathematics & Economics at the LSE to work part-time in the City of London.

Over the last five years, he broke the British A-level record by scoring 10 As and 3 Distinctions at A-level/S-level, was named Olympic Hope in handball and has been awarded almost £100,000 in scholarships by academic and financial institutions. He has worked or interned in trading and research at some of the world's leading investment banks (Goldman Sachs, Barclays Capital, UBS and Deutsche Bank) and hedge funds (Marshall Wace Asset Management and AKO Capital). Jan has been named a `wildcard entry' onto the nomination list of the Top 100 Rising Stars of European Financial Markets by Financial News, selected as One To Watch by university peers and been interviewed by CNN and several national newspapers.

Jan has founded and run four companies involved in social networking, graduate recruitment, West End night-club promotion and university admissions training. He has also founded a successful charity focusing on levelling out the playing field for applicants to Oxford and Cambridge. He is 22 years old."

This is only someone who's just graduated. People in higher positions have more qualifications (which they get later on in their careers).

Anyway, game theory is a third year topic at LSE and LSE's supposed to be the place to be for game theory - there's very strong departmental interest in it, to the point that they've just hired new guys to broaden the department's interests. Can't say I'm interested in it though.
Once you're a banker you can't really call yourself a mathematician.

Am I meant to be impress with that. Again, he isn't a mathematician but a economist who has studied at LSE where they don't do maths.

More qualificiations. Again, that really doesn't disprove my point. The person in question didn't study maths. Maybe if he had a PhD in maths then that would be interesting.

Also, A levels are easy so getting ten doesn't really prove anything.

The point I'm trying to make is most bankers are not mathematicians. Certainly, the top mathematician don't really care about money hence a lot have lived in poverty.

Anyway, banking in general is corrupted by money. The ultimate goal in life shouldn't be money but instead truth. I doubt greedy bankers and people who study economics get that.

I highly doubt that. LSE needs to get a maths department. I have read several articles that blame Game theory with the current crisis saying that its unrealistic and a better model would be from biology.
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henryt
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#246
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#246
(Original post by Swayum)
It's Business Maths + Stats, but I plan on switching to Maths and Economics, which should be easy because the first year is identical + second and third years are about 75% the same as well. I thought I was a pure mathematician as well, but around February I discovered I wasn't and since I suck at physics, LSE seemed like the right choice :p:.

Applied stats + stochastic models + actuarial science is very LSE-esque :p:. Good luck.
Heh - I now realise that the first two years of the Oxford course were completely not suited to me at all, and I really should've done a more focussed degree, or possibly an Economics degree, but, whatever, I'm pleased I've got where I am now. Maths only gets better as you go along, so if you're not enjoying First year (like I didn't!) just hang in there! They tend to put the pretty shockingly dull stuff at the beginning. Like Real Analysis, 3D Calc, Linear Algebra and simplistic Dynamics. Eugh...
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Swayum
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#247
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#247
Well, I'm off tomorrow. See you guys on the other side.
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My Alt
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#248
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#248
(Original post by Swayum)
Well, I'm off tomorrow. See you guys on the other side.
Good Luck! ~So Jealous~
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The Muon
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#249
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#249
(Original post by Swayum)
Well, I'm off tomorrow. See you guys on the other side.
Have a great time - let us know how you get on!
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Hedgeman49
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#250
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#250
**** me I'm drunk. Golf course. Flag. Misplaced. Forest. Mystery punch. **** got gnarly, *****es and hoes.
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Gaara.
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#251
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#251
First lectures today
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Mathletics
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#252
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#252
(Original post by Gaara.)
First lectures today
Have fun!!
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Simplicity
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#253
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#253
Yeah, I had three proper lectures today. Both lectures I knew everything so it was kind of boring and sort of like obvious. But, lol the way the lecturer explained implication was a bit lacking. I don't know but the key idea of implication for me seems to be its only false if something is true but what it implies is false. Yet, he didn't point that out and instead went on about consistency.

At the end when I brought that up he said I know I didn't give an example of that but because your uni students you should work it out yourself. I guess you could argue thats a valid point. However, if I didn't have the book by Eccles then I would be confused as hell.

P.S. Oh yeah, I think I will join the jiu jitsu club and maybe boxing as the club itself seems to focus on technique to overcome people and not on say fitness or strength. Although, it looks really good.
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Dadeyemi
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#254
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Well I'm in Cambridge bored as hell as I have nothing to do...

I decided to teach myself some analysis and must say it starts off increadibly boring especial things like the proof that 0 is unique where every single property of addition or real numbers etc is quoted as it is used even i.e. 0 + x = x + 0 (due to commutativity). But it get better, I guess cantors proof of the uncountability of reals is quite nice, but it seems a lot of it is just painting by numbers.

[this post seemed to turn into a review of analysis...]
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SimonM
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#255
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(Original post by Dadeyemi)
Well I'm in Cambridge bored as hell as I have nothing to do...

I decided to teach myself some analysis and must say it starts off increadibly boring especial things like the proof that 0 is unique where every single property of addition or real numbers etc is quoted as it is used even i.e. 0 + x = x + 0 (due to commutativity). But it get better, I guess cantors proof of the uncountability of reals is quite nice, but it seems a lot of it is just painting by numbers.

[this post seemed to turn into a review of analysis...]
That doesn't sound like Analysis at all to me. That sounds like set theory.
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SimonM
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#256
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Also, in the medicine forum there is an 'Medics Profiles' section (Or something like that), here: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=865511

Would this be useful for maths applicants? (Since grades and books aren't that important like medicine)
Would we post? (We being successful applicants )
Would others read it?
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Swayum
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#257
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You can read my LSE rants here: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1048278
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SimonM
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#258
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You mis-sold that Swayum. I wanted a rant!!! :rant:
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The Muon
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#259
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That was a good read sway - full marks on the number of girls numbers you have got :sexface: :perv:
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Swayum
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#260
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(Original post by The Muon)
That was a good read sway - full marks on the number of girls numbers you have got :sexface: :perv:
It's actually pretty weird how 80% of the people I've talked to are girls. I guess this is the benefit of going to LSE over Imperial :p:.

The numbers don't mean a thing though :no:
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