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Does the number π really exist? watch

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    (Original post by KingStannis)
    I wouldn't be so sure. Read up about Platonism.
    Platonism? Sounds interesting.

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    (Original post by skunkboy)
    I didn't tell you the meaning of exist? Sorry. It means to be real or to happen. Am I clear?

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    This meaning is not clear, my real do you mean something material? Pi does not exist in the sense that there are no pi's floating around, but the same can be said for any number. Pi does exist in the sense that it is a real number though.
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    (Original post by Kutta)
    It = Pi which can also mean pie which means Pi can =

    Your Pi looks yummy. But the Pi in my dream looks ugly.

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    (Original post by majmuh24)
    Back to the original question, pi is in fact a REAL number, so it must exist. If you gave me an imaginary number, that would make this topic a lot more interesting :pierre:

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    I gave you the imaginary number already. Your textbook or teacher says Pi is the real number? But Pi can't be real. Pi is an imaginary number! just forget about ' i ' in the book. Cause my definition is different.

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    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    Pi is a ratio, and a number.
    this is the right answer.


    numbers do not physically exist. (unless you write them down DON'T START ON THAT)

    that are used to define stuff. and pi is a ratio, and a number that has the same value as that ration, because if you stop pi at say.... 25 decimal places, its just (whatever the value of pi is to 25 DP) and no longer pi so to speak.
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    (Original post by skunkboy)
    Platonism? Sounds interesting.

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    Specifically mathematical platonism.
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    (Original post by skunkboy)
    I don't think that number does exist. If it does, what is its value? any proof?
    What do you mean by "exist"? It's a number. Other than certain technicalities, it isn't very different from any other number, 2 or 3 or something like that.

    I assume you want to know what pi represents. It's basically the ratio of the circumference of a circle to it's diameter. It is a constant for a circle of any radius. It'll always be approximately 3.14.

    If you want to know how this number is obtained (I assume that's what you meant by "proof"), find out for yourself. A simple technique would be - draw a circle (of a large radius preferably), take a thread, measure it's circumference and divide that value by the diameter. You'll see that you get 3.14 more or less.

    Hope this helps (:


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    (Original post by skunkboy)
    I gave you the imaginary number already. Your textbook or teacher says Pi is the real number? But Pi can't be real. Pi is an imaginary number! just forget about ' i ' in the book. Cause my definition is different.

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    Pi is a real number! I have already proven that on this thread.
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    (Original post by skunkboy)
    I gave you the imaginary number already. Your textbook or teacher says Pi is the real number? But Pi can't be real. Pi is an imaginary number! just forget about ' i ' in the book. Cause my definition is different.

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    Your definition of an 'imaginary number' might be different, but the real difference is no-one gives a toss about your definition of an imaginary number :rofl:
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    Your definition of an 'imaginary number' might be different, but the real difference is no-one gives a toss about your definition of an imaginary number :rofl:
    Lol!😄👍


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    mathematicians say what. It is a number 3.14159265.

    Chemist say what is is not a number it is a bond. It is the second bond in a double bond.

    Source
    AS knowledge

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    (Original post by skunkboy)
    (c) why on earth did you ask that question?
    (d) Hahahahaha.... you are a student or not? You know full well... hehe...

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    (c) I asked that question because I wanted an answer. You seem to be oscillating between being nice and thankful to me for providing answers to your questions and being an irritating **** who takes delight in repeatedly posting stupid *******s.

    (d) I am a student. You aren't making any sense.


    Just read the god-forsaken answers you've been given for Christ's sake. If you don't understand them then then ask for clarification or go learn something rather than just ignoring them and asking even more idiotic things.
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    (Original post by KingStannis)
    ...
    I did indeed read the link though I don't remember my exact conclusion. I followed most of it and agreed with fair amount, but there were a few points where I didn't follow the logic. Overall it was an interesting read but hasn't really changed my stance.
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    (Original post by Implication)
    I did indeed read the link though I don't remember my exact conclusion. I followed most of it and agreed with fair amount, but there were a few points where I didn't follow the logic. Overall it was an interesting read but hasn't really changed my stance.
    I think some of the reasoning relies on defences he makes earlier in "the nature of Necessity"-- it's primarily a metaphysical work on a defence of de re modality.

    I really want to read the whole book but it's an academic work so the demand for it is inelastic: they charge through the bloody nose for it.
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    Yes it does, we can calculate it to great precision (I'm talking millions and millions of decimal places) with infinite series, just because we can never ever find its true 100% precise value that doesn't make it not a number, it's just irrational (yes, this has been proven). We use approximations (for all intents and purposes they're precise enough for anything we could ever do) of it for measuring volumes and areas and angles, which according to wikipedia is one of the many definitions of a number. Honestly can't understand how this has gone on for 14 pages
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    (Original post by majmuh24)
    Pi is definitely NOT an imaginary number, by the way we class numbers, it is a REAL number so it does exist. Case closed.

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    You're still replying to these questions after all this time?

    You possess a patience I do not, clearly.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    As someone has already been said, under what definition of 'exist'? In the sense you can't count out an irrational number of something, no, but I don't see why that should be the definition of existence. Arguably, lengths of physical objects can be irrational if you were to measure them to infinite accuracy, down to the molecular level. In manufacturing materials aren't cut to 100% accuracy, but adhere to something like \pm 0.1 \% of manufacturing specifications (depending on what has cut it). So, for example, the diagonal length of the monitor you're posting onto TSR from may supposed to be 14, 17, 19, etc. inches, but in reality it's not going to be exactly that many inches, it could easily be an irrational length.
    Exist = to be real or to happen in the physical world.
    Actually, a circle doesn't exist, so ¶ doesn't exist.

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    (Original post by james22)
    This meaning is not clear, my real do you mean something material? Pi does not exist in the sense that there are no pi's floating around, but the same can be said for any number. Pi does exist in the sense that it is a real number though.
    Absolutely right...something material. Pi and other numbers can be real in your mind. Numbers are just some of imaginary things used to help human beings to do everyday activities. Human beings create numbers by using their imaginations and high intelligence.

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    (Original post by imaginative name)
    this is the right answer.


    numbers do not physically exist. (unless you write them down DON'T START ON THAT)

    that are used to define stuff. and pi is a ratio, and a number that has the same value as that ration, because if you stop pi at say.... 25 decimal places, its just (whatever the value of pi is to 25 DP) and no longer pi so to speak.
    That's right. Circles don't either.

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    (Original post by majmuh24)
    Pi is definitely NOT an imaginary number, by the way we class numbers, it is a REAL number so it does exist. Case closed.

    Imaginary numbers = numbers imagined and created by human beings. According to that definition, ¶ is definitely an imaginary number. And ¶ doesn't physically exist.

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