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    (Original post by CJKay)
    I have no idea what you just said.
    Not that I personally agree with it, but as the saying goes: "Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach."


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    (Original post by CJKay)
    A-Level IT doesn't get anybody anywhere.
    I was actively discouraged from taking A-Level IT by my GCSE IT teachers with the suggestion that I take "something more useful".
    I don't think it needs mentioning that they were right.
    Which further proves my point, that the quality of schooling is not consistent nationwide. A better school would have had better teachers helping students to pick the right AL subjects so that they can maximize their protential to get into the best unis, best jobs.

    So you can't damn students about the choices they have made 10 years ago, if they have been misinformed/misguided (that is what is happening). And yes, you can't expect like an 18 year old (especially in my day when the internet was literally 56k modem) to know the ins and outs. If you do, then what is the point of schooling?

    This is why I think a degree is much more of a practical benchmark. If you did an engineering degree, it is exactly that, and more relevant if you want to become a professional engineer than AL history for example.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    I was saying if you listen to a school teachers advice then you must be an idiot. It holds no weight in society, they are non decision makers, so they are obsolete.
    Hindsight is a beautiful thing.

    But if you are 18, naive about the world. What do you expect?
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Hindsight is a beautiful thing.

    But if you are 18, naive about the world. What do you expect?
    Depends by 18, I had already influenced my "A-Levels". Teachers can be bought influenced and coersed into working in your favour. They are only human, all about establishing needs. Looking back if i knew i could influence things, i would have done more and taken more.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Imagine if u didn't listen to them Capgemmi school leaver £16-20k, you get a degree and a guaranteed job with there A-level requirement. Also remember teachers are influencers, examiners are decision makers. A teachers opinion is not worth the paper its written on, its clearly subjective and holds 0 weight in the real world. Also your the decision maker, its your future, you should your teachers accountable. People that teach in schools are often failures themselves, takes very little do so. The most successful and academic go into the city to make moolah. Listening to inexperienced individuals is the worst thing anyone can do.
    What a bs post

    1) Not everyone has parents who are actively involved in their child's education. That then leaves teachers to guide students. If they don't do their job properly, the student is ****ed.

    2) Not every child is aware of capgemini school leaver programs. I actually did not know it existed until you told me last year. Says it all.

    3) From the time I finished my ALs 2005, things have changed dramatically. A* got introduced etc. I think this could be why some parents are unaware of the changes. In my parents day, things were a lot more relaxed when it came to breaking into corporates.

    Yet by the end of it, if a student has a blip in their ALs, they are the one's damned by HR. Despite degree performance, or the relevance of it to the role they are applying too.

    Is that fair?
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    (Original post by juiceboxy)
    I'm looking through graduate roles and a bunch of them require a 2.1 and wont even let you apply without one. What makes this so bad is that they often don't specify what you need a 2.1 in, just any degree.

    I got a 2.2 in MORSE at Warwick. I looked at a graduate role for Fujitsu- 2.1 degree and 240 UCAS points from 3 A-Levels. I have 400 UCAS points from 3 A-Levels.

    Why is the system so broken? I'm not going to pretend like I performed well at Uni, but don't mock me with these ridiculously low A-Level requirements and then say 2.1 in ANYTHING.
    I have every sympathy with your plight. It is laziness on the part of HR, who have little to do anyway! The best thing you can do is network at events and try and get a name(s) of a contact outside HR, who has some sway! Oh and persist with your efforts!
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Depends by 18, I had already influenced my "A-Levels". Teachers can be bought influenced and coersed into working in your favour. They are only human, all about establishing needs. Looking back if i knew i could influence things, i would have done more and taken more.
    Again, hindsight is a beautiful thing.

    As for teachers being influenced and coersed into working in your favour.

    Who the **** thinks like that when they are 18? The maturity levels for many is just not there.

    The point is sloane, schools exist for a reason, their job is to guide students. Otherwise we all may as well all be home schooled.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    I was saying if you listen to a school teachers advice then you must be an idiot. It holds no weight in society, they are non decision makers, so they are obsolete.
    I'm not sure where you got that idea. Many of my teachers were ex-professionals, a couple of them also PhD holders (my mechanics teacher, for instance, was the only reason I passed mechanics). I'm sorry you consider me an idiot, but I'm incredibly glad I did listen to them because I wouldn't be where I am today without them, and I am incredibly grateful that I got them.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Which further proves my point, that the quality of schooling is not consistent nationwide. A better school would have had better teachers helping students to pick the right AL subjects so that they can maximize their protential to get into the best unis, best jobs.

    So you can't damn students about the choices they have made 10 years ago, if they have been misinformed/misguided (that is what is happening). And yes, you can't expect like an 18 year old (especially in my day when the internet was literally 56k modem) to know the ins and outs. If you do, then what is the point of schooling?

    This is why I think a degree is much more of a practical benchmark. If you did an engineering degree, it is exactly that, and more relevant if you want to become a professional engineer than AL history for example.
    You only get misguided if you let someone treat you like a mug. "You can't cheat an honest man". Speak at people to get across a point and give demands. Subordinate people need to know their place.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    You only get misguided if you let someone treat you like a mug. "You can't cheat an honest man". Speak at people to get across a point and give demands. Subordinate people need to know their place.
    No, you get misguided if you get told misinformation when you don't know any better.
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    (Original post by CJKay)
    I'm not sure where you got that idea. Many of my teachers were ex-professionals, a couple of them also PhD holders (my mechanics teacher, for instance, was the only reason I passed mechanics). I'm sorry you consider me an idiot, but I'm incredibly glad I did listen to them because I wouldn't be where I am today without them, and I am incredibly grateful that I got them.
    If that was the case, how can you use ALs as a benchmark?

    None of my teachers were this.

    It's also why my school offered AL IT and not AL Computing. Didn't have the facilities - state school.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    If that was the case, how can you use ALs as a benchmark?

    None of my teachers were this.

    It's also why my school offered AL IT and not AL Computing. Didn't have the facilities - state school.
    ? I don't. I never claimed A-levels were anything but an awful benchmark - I might as well have failed all of mine. We also didn't have Computing, but they had just introduced electronics under a fairly liberal syllabus.
    I think you're confusing me with somebody else.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    What a bs post

    1) Not everyone has parents who are actively involved in their child's education. That then leaves teachers to guide students. If they don't do their job properly, the student is ****ed.

    2) Not every child is aware of capgemini school leaver programs. I actually did not know it existed until you told me last year. Says it all.

    3) From the time I finished my ALs 2005, things have changed dramatically. A* got introduced etc. I think this could be why some parents are unaware of the changes. In my parents day, things were a lot more relaxed when it came to breaking into corporates.

    Yet by the end of it, if a student has a blip in their ALs, they are the one's damned by HR. Despite degree performance, or the relevance of it to the role they are applying too.

    Is that fair?
    Your ignorant about many things, it depends how affluent your friends are. Im 26 most my friends are the same age and directors of corps. So of course i would know. "If you can lie down to make a child, you can stand up and be a dad". Having a child is a lifetime commitment, some people should'nt have kids. Use a condom if your like that. Your only 2-3 years older then me, corps grad schemes have always been there. Confronting me about parental failures is not the solution, im not your dad. I did influence anything, in life people are held accountable for decisions.
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    (Original post by CJKay)
    I'm not sure where you got that idea. Many of my teachers were ex-professionals, a couple of them also PhD holders (my mechanics teacher, for instance, was the only reason I passed mechanics). I'm sorry you consider me an idiot, but I'm incredibly glad I did listen to them because I wouldn't be where I am today without them, and I am incredibly grateful that I got them.
    They are just pieces of paper, high end grads with PHDs from Oxford/Harvard wouldn't usually waste their time in schools. So they are bad role models, university lecturers that is a step up. A cabbage can teach in a school, we pay for what we get for. A **** teacher in a school on £30k i wouldn't let them influence me. They wouldn't make me £££.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    No, you get misguided if you get told misinformation when you don't know any better.
    If your naive at 18 then there is something seriously wrong with you. You can fight and die for your country at 16, get married... (In gretna green). And you can't make a few simple decisions. Its not me you need to bring it up with. You pay for what you get, understand that, you will go far.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Your ignorant about many things, it depends how affluent your friends are. Im 26 most my friends are the same age and directors of corps. So of course i would know. "If you can lie down to make a child, you can stand up and be a dad". Having a child is a lifetime commitment, some people should'nt have kids. Use a condom if your like that. Your only 2-3 years older then me, corps grad schemes have always been there. Confronting me about parental failures is not the solution, im not your dad. I did influence anything, in life people are held accountable for decisions.
    I have relatives that have worked in corporates.

    It was a lot easier back then. That's why you had people like Nick Leeson break into the financial sector despite a degree from Middlesex - it just won't happen now, not even for back office roles.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    If your naive at 18 then there is something seriously wrong with you. You can fight and die for your country at 16, get married... (In gretna green). And you can't make a few simple decisions. Its not me you need to bring it up with. You pay for what you get, understand that, you will go far.
    God, I swear you talk like a muppet sometimes.

    Not everyone is raised in an environment where they have people guiding them properly.

    What do you expect?

    And when you are young, that is key.

    You are a product of your environment.

    These are not simple decisions, they require a full awareness of how the education system, along with knowing what you want to do in your life to get it right.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    They are just pieces of paper, high end grads with PHDs from Oxford/Harvard wouldn't usually waste their time in schools. So they are bad role models, university lecturers that is a step up. A cabbage can teach in a school, we pay for what we get for. A **** teacher in a school on £30k i wouldn't let them influence me. They wouldn't make me £££.
    Not everyone can afford to go to Eton or Harrow Sloane.
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    (Original post by CJKay)
    ? I don't. I never claimed A-levels were anything but an awful benchmark - I might as well have failed all of mine. We also didn't have Computing, but they had just introduced electronics under a fairly liberal syllabus.
    I think you're confusing me with somebody else.
    Sorry, my bad.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    God, I swear you talk like a muppet sometimes.

    Not everyone is raised in an environment where they have people guiding them properly.

    What do you expect?

    And when you are young, that is key.

    You are a product of your environment.

    These are not simple decisions, they require a full awareness of how the education system, along with knowing what you want to do in your life to get it right.
    Your parents like anyone will know, whatever you put into work you get out! You can't blame society for parental failures. If you put a child on this planet its your responsibility to bring them up.
 
 
 
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