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Medicine 2017 entry watch

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    Oxford
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    (Original post by AortaStudyMore)
    I think you'll find that most places do a very similar amount of PBL now, so I wouldn't worry about to what extent they do it. You'll probably also find that you quite enjoy working in small groups, I'm a first year (not at UEA) and I didn't like the idea of PBL when I applied to medical school, but it has become one of my favourite things (apart from anatomy of course).
    Thank you! I've just been worried a bit about PBL and i don't want an entirely/highly PBL course, so thanks for the reassurance

    (Original post by Cam,)
    Hi, I'm really glad to hear that you love the sound of UEA! You should definitely come along and have a look round at one of the open days in the summer, we'll be running campus tours, medicine/PBL workshops etc and there'll be loads of chance to chat to current med students, lecturers and admissions tutors.

    As for what it's like to live here, I have really loved life here. What kind of things are you into? It's a campus based university, built on really beautiful parkland, so we have miles of woodland, a gorgeous lake and river, and even a donkey sanctuary on campus. For me all that's really important as I love to have lots of green space around. There's everything you need on campus - shops, banks, launderettes, 27/7 library etc. The campus is a twenty minute bus journey or bike ride from the city centre, and Norwich is one of my absolute favourite cities - there's so many great pubs and cafes, loads of medieval architecture and old streets, and so much shopping. It's just a bus journey from lots of seaside towns too. There are so many clubs and societies too, what kind of things do you enjoy?

    In terms of entry requirements, yes I'd say it's relatively balanced. You need 6+ GCSEs at A or above, and AAAb at A Level. However, other than that there are no strict cut-offs with the UKCAT or GCSE grades (you'll find some med schools have a strict number of A*s or a UKCAT cutoff (although having said that, UEA do say that it's unusual for applicants with UKCAT < 600 to be interviewed)). In general, I'd say that with UEA applications, they're looking at you as a whole person rather than just stats. The personal statement is really important and so is the interview, where their questions are trying to find out as much as possible about you as a person, rather than your knowledge. For example, just a big list of work experience placements and extracurricular activities in your PS is unlikely to impress them. They're going to be looking for something more, something that tells them more about you as a person. When you talk about your work experience, you need to be able to properly reflect on it - what did it mean to you, how did it make you feel, what did you learn about life as a doctor, what did you learn about the role of a doctor (to the patients, to the multidisciplinary team, to society), how did you move forwards with that knowledge and inspiration. Great if you are grade 8 piano, but that means nothing unless you can talk about what that actually means to you - does it mean you can de-stress after a long day, does it mean you can explore your creative side, has it taught you about commitment and working hard, has it helped you meet new people? In my opinion, that's what I'd say the application process most favours - are you the kind of person who would make a great doctor.

    In terms of PBL, I have talked quite a bit about the teaching methods here - http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...7#post63946107

    As for is there a lot of it, hmmm I'll say yes and no. Yes, you have a three-hour PBL session every week, and for your first three years you have to submit a short piece of PBL work every week too. So it does involve a decent amount of your time, which means you have lots of opportunities to ask questions about things you're unsure of. But we have loads of different ways of learning as well as PBL - plenty of seminars and lectures, placements at GP and hospital throughout, anatomy workshops and dissections etc etc. So yes, you can't avoid PBL if you're at UEA, but your learning isn't dependent on it, if that makes sense.

    Have a read of the post I've linked to above, and if you still have any questions about UEA or anything at all, don't hesitate to ask
    Thanks for the extensive response! I'm actually going to the open day in June, so I'm really looking forward to it now!

    Norwich sounds like such a nice area! Does it have many good music venues? And what is the best accommodation?

    That makes me sound like I'm going to uni for the wing reasons, but oh well, would you say that the club's and societies are good? I'm actually quite interested in the technical side of drama, do you know if i would be able to do that?

    Thanks again for the amazing response!
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    (Original post by Cam,)
    Hi, I'm really glad to hear that you love the sound of UEA! You should definitely come along and have a look round at one of the open days in the summer, we'll be running campus tours, medicine/PBL workshops etc and there'll be loads of chance to chat to current med students, lecturers and admissions tutors.

    As for what it's like to live here, I have really loved life here. What kind of things are you into? It's a campus based university, built on really beautiful parkland, so we have miles of woodland, a gorgeous lake and river, and even a donkey sanctuary on campus. For me all that's really important as I love to have lots of green space around. There's everything you need on campus - shops, banks, launderettes, 27/7 library etc. The campus is a twenty minute bus journey or bike ride from the city centre, and Norwich is one of my absolute favourite cities - there's so many great pubs and cafes, loads of medieval architecture and old streets, and so much shopping. It's just a bus journey from lots of seaside towns too. There are so many clubs and societies too, what kind of things do you enjoy?

    In terms of entry requirements, yes I'd say it's relatively balanced. You need 6+ GCSEs at A or above, and AAAb at A Level. However, other than that there are no strict cut-offs with the UKCAT or GCSE grades (you'll find some med schools have a strict number of A*s or a UKCAT cutoff (although having said that, UEA do say that it's unusual for applicants with UKCAT < 600 to be interviewed)). In general, I'd say that with UEA applications, they're looking at you as a whole person rather than just stats. The personal statement is really important and so is the interview, where their questions are trying to find out as much as possible about you as a person, rather than your knowledge. For example, just a big list of work experience placements and extracurricular activities in your PS is unlikely to impress them. They're going to be looking for something more, something that tells them more about you as a person. When you talk about your work experience, you need to be able to properly reflect on it - what did it mean to you, how did it make you feel, what did you learn about life as a doctor, what did you learn about the role of a doctor (to the patients, to the multidisciplinary team, to society), how did you move forwards with that knowledge and inspiration. Great if you are grade 8 piano, but that means nothing unless you can talk about what that actually means to you - does it mean you can de-stress after a long day, does it mean you can explore your creative side, has it taught you about commitment and working hard, has it helped you meet new people? In my opinion, that's what I'd say the application process most favours - are you the kind of person who would make a great doctor.

    In terms of PBL, I have talked quite a bit about the teaching methods here - http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...7#post63946107

    As for is there a lot of it, hmmm I'll say yes and no. Yes, you have a three-hour PBL session every week, and for your first three years you have to submit a short piece of PBL work every week too. So it does involve a decent amount of your time, which means you have lots of opportunities to ask questions about things you're unsure of. But we have loads of different ways of learning as well as PBL - plenty of seminars and lectures, placements at GP and hospital throughout, anatomy workshops and dissections etc etc. So yes, you can't avoid PBL if you're at UEA, but your learning isn't dependent on it, if that makes sense.

    Have a read of the post I've linked to above, and if you still have any questions about UEA or anything at all, don't hesitate to ask

    I really like the look of UEA, but i've been told the trasport links are really bad in comparison to getting to other uni's. I live near Birmingham so can you please comment on the standard of transport infrastructure if I wanted to visit my home Thanks
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    (Original post by Gogregg)
    Thanks for the extensive response! I'm actually going to the open day in June, so I'm really looking forward to it now!

    Norwich sounds like such a nice area! Does it have many good music venues? And what is the best accommodation?

    That makes me sound like I'm going to uni for the wing reasons, but oh well, would you say that the club's and societies are good? I'm actually quite interested in the technical side of drama, do you know if i would be able to do that?

    Thanks again for the amazing response!
    No worries, I'm happy to help Yay it's great you're coming in June! I might be working on that open day (or I might be too busy revising for end of year exams - we'll see!) so maybe I'll see you there

    In terms of music, there's loads. The LCR is the concert venue/nightclub on campus, it has a capacity of about 1500 so it's a decent size but also quite intimate which is cool. I've seen The Kooks, The Fratellis twice, Ben Howard, Professor Green, The Game (ended up on stage with him :O), First Aid Kit and probably more I've forgotten about. Coldplay came in 2011ish too but I couldn't get tickets. There's also venues in the city too, like Waterfront, where I saw Klaxons, and Open, where Newton Faulkner was recently. They sometimes get granny rock like Rod Stewart at the football ground. And then there's loads and loads of cafés and bars, like the Birdcage and the Bicycle Shop, that do open mic nights and cool indie concerts for smaller local artists. UEA Live Music Society are always putting on gigs too. Oh and we had the Big Weekend in the summer which was UNBELIEVABLE but I'm afraid that's not likely to be coming back to Norwich any time soon! (although Latitude and Sundown are festivals nearby)

    With accommodation, there's a range for whatever you're looking for really. The majority of accommodation on campus is "Premium En-Suite", in which you get your own en-suite, and the kitchen is shared between 8-12 people, this is where I stayed. Then there's the University Village, which is (only just) outside campus, they have en-suites that are a bit smaller and their flats are smaller too, I think it's usually about eight people. Then there's the Ziggurats, which have shared bathrooms, but are super sociable and people are always going around between flats to hang out with other people. If I was to go back and choose again, in hindsight I wouldn't have chosen the one I did - I'd choose the Village or Ziggurats as they are both more sociable than the one I was in. It's just a personal choice really, depends what you're looking for

    Those are absolutely not the wrong reasons to go to uni, they're the right ones! You should absolutely get stuck into as many clubs and societies as you can Yeah they're fantastic, it's a great way to meet people, and I really regret not joining more and getting more involved in my first year. You can look at all the societies and clubs here - http://www.ueastudent.com/groups - there's tabs at the top to go between societies and sports clubs. Have a look, there's literally hundreds, looking now I hadn't heard of so many of them. Here's Drama Soc's page - http://www.ueastudent.com/groups/drama-society--9 - and website - http://www.ueadramasoc.com. They put on loads of performances, if that's what you're into. There's lots of drama students here so it's a really active society. Matt Smith and the guy who plays Gimli both came to UEA

    You're very welcome, it's great to hear people so enthusiastic about UEA Again any more questions at all don't hesitate!
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    (Original post by C.L-A)
    hey I'm currently in year 12 looking to do medicine and was wondering if anyone knew whether I need AS exams because of the new courses I know that I have to sit my maths AS. But because I'm thinking of dropping physics do you know if I need to sit an AS for medicine. Also I'm looking to do an EPQ (perhaps this could replace it?)
    So I was on a taster course at King's earlier this week and we spoke to the admissions officer about this cos its really annoying that there isnt one clear-cut answer :/. Her initial response was ' I don't know, I haven't really thought about it' which was quite concerning XD. So the next day she told us that for King's they would prefer candidates to sit the exams, but if they haven't because they were not allowed then its fine, but this would place more emphasis on other parts of your application like GCSE's. Your teachers also need to write specifically that the student was not able to sit the exams. Now this is only for King's but i hope it helps!
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    (Original post by The_Dragon_)
    I really like the look of UEA, but i've been told the trasport links are really bad in comparison to getting to other uni's. I live near Birmingham so can you please comment on the standard of transport infrastructure if I wanted to visit my home Thanks
    I was excited when I saw this message because I was pretty sure there was a direct Megabus between UEA and Birmingham for like a quid, but there's no mention of it online so I think they must have stopped the service In terms of getting from Norwich to elsewhere in the country, if you don't have a car you're generally going to have to go towards London and then up. Trains from Norwich station to London Liverpool Street are leaving at least every hour, and the journey is only about two hours, then I believe it's another couple of hours on the train to Birmingham. Alternatively, you can take the train more directly west and change at Peterborough.

    If you're like me and a bit of a cheapskate, you can get the Megabus or National Express, although this will be via London. There's a Megabus service directly from UEA campus to London Victoria, from which you can get a coach up to Bham, or there's a National Express coach from UEA campus that goes to Stansted, Gatwick, Heathrow, from all of which you can get coaches to Bham. This will take longer than the train but be much cheaper, you're looking at like a fiver for each leg of the Megabus journey, depending on what time. It's really handy that these leave from UEA campus, so getting to all London airports, London city centre, and Cambridge is easy and quick and cheap
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    ONE MORE THING GUYS. If you hadn't already heard there are some changes to the UKCAT:

    Decision analysis is out! (officially) We will sit a new(ish) section called decision making but it wont count towards our final score as it is just an internal assessement to see if it works for next year, so unis wont see it and it wont count.

    Also Situational judgment is no longer part of the main UKCAT score but a separate section that gets scored separately. The best answer will get the most amount of points, and the second best answer will also recieve a point at least.

    On a side note, just a statistic: for the BMAT which is scored out of 9.0, 9.0, 5A:

    Average Applicant: 4.5, 4.3, 3A
    Average Imperial Applicant: 5.7, 5.7, 3.5B
    Average UCL Applicant: 5.4, 5.5, 3.5A
    Average Cambridge Applicant: 6.1, 5.9, 3.7A (avergae UMS btw was 96%)

    And less than 1% last year got above 7.0
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    I'm only allowed to do three as levels at my school. They say that the university entry requirements are changing next year and they won't require a fourth as level. Also we won't be sitting our chemistry and biology as exams this year because it's all gone linear. Will this put me at a disadvantage. Also is it true that medical schools won't ask for a fourth as level??? I'm really worried because at the moment it seems like every medical school asks for it so I may not be able to apply to any of them 😣😞😟
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    (Original post by doculmc7171)
    I'm only allowed to do three as levels at my school. They say that the university entry requirements are changing next year and they won't require a fourth as level. Also we won't be sitting our chemistry and biology as exams this year because it's all gone linear. Will this put me at a disadvantage. Also is it true that medical schools won't ask for a fourth as level??? I'm really worried because at the moment it seems like every medical school asks for it so I may not be able to apply to any of them 😣😞😟
    I'm pretty certain most medical schools haven't been asking for a fourth AS level so you won't be put at a disadvantage if you get the grades
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    (Original post by Gogregg)
    I'm pretty certain most medical schools haven't been asking for a fourth AS level so you won't be put at a disadvantage if you get the grades
    Do you know when med schools will release their 2017 entry entrance criteria ?
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    (Original post by The_Dragon_)
    Do you know when med schools will release their 2017 entry entrance criteria ?
    I think they already have?
    I'm not certain though, sorry
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    (Original post by The_Dragon_)
    Do you know when med schools will release their 2017 entry entrance criteria ?
    I think most of them have now? I know for sure St George's and Newcastle have released their 2017 prospectuses along with entrance criteria - and so far the only university I've found that hasn't updated their admissions statement is Bristol? But they said that they'd be updating soon


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    I've been looking for a thread like this for a while now - hoping to apply to medicine this year but I'm not doing so well in AS Chemistry - was asked to drop it

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    (Original post by nomophobia)
    I've been looking for a thread like this for a while now - hoping to apply to medicine this year but I'm not doing so well in AS Chemistry - was asked to drop it

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    Hmm. You will need Chemistry AS to do medicine unfortunately.
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    Does taking a gap year and applying with your A2 levels give you any sort of advantage or is it the same odds as people straight from sixth form/college? I've heard a few people saying they prefer it because unis take less of a risk as they already know their grades but is this true?

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    (Original post by nomophobia)
    I've been looking for a thread like this for a while now - hoping to apply to medicine this year but I'm not doing so well in AS Chemistry - was asked to drop it

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    Chemistry is required at almost all, if not all, medical schools to full A-Level so if you do have your heart set on Medicine maybe look into getting a tutor? I've heard stories of friends really improving their grades with the aid of one on one tuition.

    Hope that is of some help!
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    (Original post by RedNebula)
    Does taking a gap year and applying with your A2 levels give you any sort of advantage or is it the same odds as people straight from sixth form/college? I've heard a few people saying they prefer it because unis take less of a risk as they already know their grades but is this true?

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    I don't think you can read into it too much to be honest. People say things like it's less of a risk, but when you think about it, the universities will likely offer the same number of offers every year. So it's not simply a case of them thinking that because you have the grades you are a lower risk option. It all comes down to your performance against the other candidates who apply - especially at the interview stage. I hope this dispels some of the rumours - and best of luck if you are going to apply after a gap-year!
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    (Original post by Funky_Giraffe)
    I don't think you can read into it too much to be honest. People say things like it's less of a risk, but when you think about it, the universities will likely offer the same number of offers every year. So it's not simply a case of them thinking that because you have the grades you are a lower risk option. It all comes down to your performance against the other candidates who apply - especially at the interview stage. I hope this dispels some of the rumours - and best of luck if you are going to apply after a gap-year!
    Okay thank you!

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    Just wondering if anyone on here went to the Cardiff Open Day on April 13th and attended the medicine talks? The website says the admissions criteria for 2017 entry for medicine are being reviewed and are waiting for approval (because of the A level reforms I'm guessing, and perhaps because of the huge number of applicants they get each year).
    Did the admissions team at the talks actually discuss what changes (if any) had been decided or is it still under review? Just wondering if the information is out there, but the website has not yet been updated.

    I have posted this question in a couple of other threads - sorry if you keep seeing it.
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    Hi all. I am graduating this summer with medical science degree and am applying for medicine for 2017 entry. I was wondering is anybody applying for a backup? Last time I applied for undergraduate medicine and my backup was medical science (which I ended up getting). So now I am thinking to apply for medicine and was considering to apply for a masters course as a backup?
    Graduate entry is even more competitive as I hear so would a backup be a masters good idea?



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    This is the official 2017 Entry facebook page for medical applicants. Apparently successful applicants are sharing resources etc in this group so might be worth joining!

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/283528955316428/

    Thank me later!
 
 
 
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