Oxford PAT 2016

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    Hi, I solved the 2015 paper, which is here:
    https://drive.google.com/a/physicsan...NIQVlNOWs/view
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    (Original post by PhysicsMathsTut)
    Hi, I solved the 2015 paper, which is here:
    https://drive.google.com/a/physicsan...NIQVlNOWs/view
    I think you forgot to answer question 19 last part
    Would you say that this paper was one of the easier ones ?
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    (Original post by rohan.nuck)
    I think you forgot to answer question 19 last part
    Would you say that this paper was one of the easier ones ?
    Thanks for letting me know. There was also a calculation error in question 4, which are both updated now.
    Yes, I found the paper easy
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    Quick question using the picture i have attached as an example
    I tend to not finish simplifying my answers i guess like here i just left my answer as 2^3/2 i tend to find myself having this happen occasionally, would it be ok here suppose to just leave it as 2^3/2
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    (Original post by NatoHeadshot)
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    Quick question using the picture i have attached as an example
    I tend to not finish simplifying my answers i guess like here i just left my answer as 2^3/2 i tend to find myself having this happen occasionally, would it be ok here suppose to just leave it as 2^3/2
    It is technically the same thing as you have solved for x so I'm sure you'd still get the marks
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    hey guys, can someone explain how the quadratic part of the graph occurs? never seen a graph like this?
    and where can i practice questions like these
    http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/pat/solutions-2015/

    Question 9
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    (Original post by NatoHeadshot)
    hey guys, can someone explain how the quadratic part of the graph occurs? never seen a graph like this?
    and where can i practice questions like these
    http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/pat/solutions-2015/

    Question 9
    It is a rational function - they tend to pop up a lot in the PAT or the interview. Watch these vids on how to sketch them:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-CydtdDYD8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2N62v_63SBo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7ycTWq6BFk

    They're not the exact same but they should provide skills necessary to tackle any sketching function question.

    Hope this helps
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    (Original post by hellomynameisr)
    It is a rational function - they tend to pop up a lot in the PAT or the interview. Watch these vids on how to sketch them:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-CydtdDYD8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2N62v_63SBo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7ycTWq6BFk

    They're not the exact same but they should provide skills necessary to tackle any sketching function question.

    Hope this helps
    thanks
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    (Original post by NatoHeadshot)
    Name:  Capture.JPG
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    Quick question using the picture i have attached as an example
    I tend to not finish simplifying my answers i guess like here i just left my answer as 2^3/2 i tend to find myself having this happen occasionally, would it be ok here suppose to just leave it as 2^3/2
    Sorry for not seeing this; it seems you've tagged the wrong profile. My name doesn't have the 's' in it. The one you've tagged is still me, but I no longer use that account.

    But as has been stated above, I really don't think you'd lose marks for leaving it like that
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    (Original post by NatoHeadshot)
    hey guys, can someone explain how the quadratic part of the graph occurs? never seen a graph like this?
    and where can i practice questions like these
    http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/pat/solutions-2015/

    Question 9
    Its not a quadratic xD
    But i guess the basic principles in sketching graphs can be kind of summarised this way.
    Look for asympototes ( virtical and horizontal ) i don't think you will need to know about oblique asymptotes for the PAT.
    Consider what happens as x tends to infinity and to negative infinity
    Consider what happens as x tends to a if x=a is an asymptote etc
    Differentiate and look for stationary points
    figure out the nature of the stationary point
    You should be able to sketch them with that
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    Hey guys does the actual pat have more space per question then it looks on the online pdf cause it seems each question has a a side or so, sorry if its stupid. Just wondering cause id probably need more space for some
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    (Original post by NatoHeadshot)
    Hey guys does the actual pat have more space per question then it looks on the online pdf cause it seems each question has a a side or so, sorry if its stupid. Just wondering cause id probably need more space for some
    Each question only has one page to answer on. However I remember in one paper they had extra sheets at the back for rough working. I think the invigilator said last year that we could ask for extra paper. However with enough practice it is very possible to do all the working in the space provided
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    I need help please

    Question b ii) (with what speed will it move?) http://www.physics.ox.ac.uk/olympiad...2013_prt_1.pdf

    Now I understand that rope D is moving upwards with "v" and rope B is moving downwards with v*(b/a)
    therefore, I thought W would move up with v-(v*b/a), however, the mark scheme says it's moving up with 0.5v(1-b/a).
    Why is it moving upwards only with HALF the velocity of the vector sum of velocities of ropes D and B?

    Thanks

    edit: maybe tangotangopapa2
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    (Original post by lawlieto)
    I need help please

    Question b ii) (with what speed will it move?) http://www.physics.ox.ac.uk/olympiad...2013_prt_1.pdf

    Now I understand that rope D is moving upwards with "v" and rope B is moving downwards with v*(b/a)
    therefore, I thought W would move up with v-(v*b/a), however, the mark scheme says it's moving up with 0.5v(1-b/a).
    Why is it moving upwards only with HALF the velocity of the vector sum of velocities of ropes D and B?

    Thanks

    edit: maybe tangotangopapa2
    Another way of thinking about this problem is considering the following situation:
    Say, Rope B is moving up with velocity v and rope D is also moving up with velocity v, would you expect the velocity of the body to be 2v? Obviously not, if two ropes on the side are moving up with velocity v each then, body would also be moving up with velocity v.

    Consider a general case. Say there were n ropes connected to the object moving up at velocity v. The velocity of body would still be v, wouldn't it? That is you divide vector sum of velocity by the number of ropes connected to it in order to find the velocity of object.

    Hope this helps!!1
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    (Original post by tangotangopapa2)
    Another way of thinking about this problem is considering the following situation:
    Say, Rope B is moving up with velocity v and rope D is also moving up with velocity v, would you expect the velocity of the body to be 2v? Obviously not, if two ropes on the side are moving up with velocity v each then, body would also be moving up with velocity v.

    Consider a general case. Say there were n ropes connected to the object moving up at velocity v. The velocity of body would still be v, wouldn't it? That is you divide vector sum of velocity by the number of ropes connected to it in order to find the velocity of object.

    Hope this helps!!1
    It makes sense.. thanks
    A quick question: is there a buoyant force on a rectangular block if it's at the bottom of a container that contains some fluid?
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    (Original post by lawlieto)
    It makes sense.. thanks
    A quick question: is there a buoyant force on a rectangular block if it's at the bottom of a container that contains some fluid?
    No there is no buoyant force at the bottom of a container due to fluid contained in it. Side note: Buoyant force is always upwards.

    Would you mind if I asked you which course will you be enrolling in?
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    (Original post by tangotangopapa2)
    No there is no buoyant force at the bottom of a container due to fluid contained in it. Side note: Buoyant force is always upwards.

    Would you mind if I asked you which course will you be enrolling in?
    chemistry
    so would there be a buoyant force on a sphere then?
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    (Original post by lawlieto)
    chemistry
    so would there be a buoyant force on a sphere then?
    No, not in self sustained container (not even in spherical container), unless some part of the container is immersed into fluid.
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    (Original post by tangotangopapa2)
    No, not in self sustained container (not even in spherical container), unless some part of the container is immersed into fluid.
    The following question is from an American physics textbook:
    A glass ball of radius 2 cm sits at the bottom of a container of milk that has a density of 1.03 g/cm^3. The normal force on the ball from the container's lower surface has magnitude 9.48*10^-2 N. What is the mass of the ball?

    Initially I thought normal force = weight because it sits at the bottom but the mark scheme says:
    buoyant force + normal force = weight, ie:
    FN + ρmilk g V − mglass g = 0 (copied from mark scheme)

    This is why I asked the above and it made me confused, so I wondered if it's a sphere, then there is buoyant force because the sphere touches the bottom only at 1 point and the milk is actually exerting pressure on the rest of the sphere from the bottom of it?
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    Do mechanics for furthermaths maybe and the core is not required for the pat.
    Bpho Round 1 papaers are kind of great together with AS and A2 Challenge should be enough work.
    Round 2 might be good for interviews.
    A2 physics concentrate on mathematical topics (waves magnetism electricity circular motion etc mechanics dynamics and so on )
    You might want to google 'Oxford Vacation work physics and download the pdf too'
 
 
 
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