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    (Original post by SummerSunshine)
    They're interviewing earlier this year, so it might not be as much of an issue. They may also interview more people, but I wouldn't say it's guaranteed when they've made the date change too! I guess we can't really tell!!
    Yep I'm completely guessing! I saw that they were interviewing earlier this year, but I'm not sure that solves their problem. If people are flat out not going to their Warwick interview it means that Warwick was never their first choice. So interviewing earlier will improve attendance, however, if those same candidates get offers from their preferred uni and reject Warwick, they may end up giving lots of offers out to people wait listed (thus in the end ~70% get offers anyway). I should really stop with all this conjecture...
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    guys need some serious help. want to apply to kings 5 year as a graduate. i got a measly 627.5 average this year (down from 642.5 last year). last years mcl cut off was 630 - do you think this will increase slightly this year? just don't want to waste any chances as this year is now my last application to med
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    based on the only evidence we have, which is that scores have increased slightly (6 points when averaged /900), the advice would be not to apply if you have a safer option. Depends what the alternative is
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    I have a score of bang on 705. I've applied to Barts, Southampton and Warwick. Realistically what do you think my chances of being offered an interview are?
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    (Original post by Ooompalumpa)
    Sorry to interrupt, but are you looking at the four year course at Barts?
    Both 4 & 5 lol I'm looking everywhere
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    I'm still trying to decide between Warwick or Nottingham as my final course choice (my others being Newcastle, Southampton and St George's - I'm a non-science graduate). I have a strong UKCAT score (3050), which I'm cautiously optimistic would get me an interview at Warwick, Newcastle or Soton. GAMSAT is a massive question mark - I felt it went reasonably well but who knows, I haven't sat it before and I don't have much of a feel for how I'll score.

    What I'm grappling with is: do I put down Warwick for a fair chance of an interview, or Notts? For context, I went to both on open days and was impressed by both institutions, although probably Notts more (both the uni generally and course specifically). A big difference is Coventry really really doesn't appeal to me, while Derby/Nottingham are pretty nice places to live (controversial view, but I like them) and more affordable.

    Any advice? I guess all other things being equal, I'd apply to Notts, but if my GAMSAT score comes through and it's not good enough, I'd really kick myself.
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    So just to clarify, 4 year courses are partly paid for by the NHS but you have to pay the first term and other bits n pieces, whereas the 5 year course, you pay 4 years up front ?? Is That right? Cause unless I get fortunately get accepted in a 4 year course in the next few years, I'll never afford a 5 year... who has £36k casually lying around ?!
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    (Original post by mzchocolate)
    So just to clarify, 4 year courses are partly paid for by the NHS but you have to pay the first term and other bits n pieces, whereas the 5 year course, you pay 4 years up front ?? Is That right? Cause unless I get fortunately get accepted in a 4 year course in the next few years, I'll never afford a 5 year... who has £36k casually lying around ?!
    Ok - about that: why are people stressing out so much about 5 year courses? Either I am missing something or it's actually not that scary. I called student finance England today and they told me that as a graduate I am allowed to have a maintenance loan, which is 8200 per year (and this is even though I graduated from Scotland and am EU!). This means you have to self-fund the rest 800 for 4 years = 3200. Also, I would presume that graduates will have developed study techniques and have some time for a part-time job to support themselves.
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    (Original post by cyftii)
    Ok - about that: why are people stressing out so much about 5 year courses? Either I am missing something or it's actually not that scary. I called student finance England today and they told me that as a graduate I am allowed to have a maintenance loan, which is 8200 per year (and this is even though I graduated from Scotland and am EU!). This means you have to self-fund the rest 800 for 4 years = 3200. Also, I would presume that graduates will have developed study techniques and have some time for a part-time job to support themselves.
    If a part time job is enough to fund rent, food, bills, having a life for 5 years and the £3200!? I doubt working 20 hrs a week stacking shelves would be enough.
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    (Original post by cyftii)
    Ok - about that: why are people stressing out so much about 5 year courses? Either I am missing something or it's actually not that scary. I called student finance England today and they told me that as a graduate I am allowed to have a maintenance loan, which is 8200 per year (and this is even though I graduated from Scotland and am EU!). This means you have to self-fund the rest 800 for 4 years = 3200. Also, I would presume that graduates will have developed study techniques and have some time for a part-time job to support themselves.
    What?! I read on STudent finance that if you have a done a degree you can't get another loan for a mother 5 ear degree?


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    (Original post by cyftii)
    Ok - about that: why are people stressing out so much about 5 year courses? Either I am missing something or it's actually not that scary. I called student finance England today and they told me that as a graduate I am allowed to have a maintenance loan, which is 8200 per year (and this is even though I graduated from Scotland and am EU!). This means you have to self-fund the rest 800 for 4 years = 3200. Also, I would presume that graduates will have developed study techniques and have some time for a part-time job to support themselves.
    Its true in the pre-clinical years that it's easy to have a job, but as you move to clinical the holidays disappear and the work load gets more and more intense. I wouldn't want to risk my medical career on the hope that I can maintain that for 2.5(ish) years and not burn out/fail.
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    (Original post by HCAssistant93)
    What?! I read on STudent finance that if you have a done a degree you can't get another loan for a mother 5 ear degree?


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    Yes, this is true for tuition fees though. I called them twice for the last two weeks to confirm it, and both times they said we are eligible for a maintenance loan. I asked them specifically if I can use it for tuition fees and the answer was positive
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    (Original post by hharman19)
    I have a score of bang on 705. I've applied to Barts, Southampton and Warwick. Realistically what do you think my chances of being offered an interview are?
    Avoid barts. They want 730 +.
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    (Original post by neuronerd)
    Its true in the pre-clinical years that it's easy to have a job, but as you move to clinical the holidays disappear and the work load gets more and more intense. I wouldn't want to risk my medical career on the hope that I can maintain that for 2.5(ish) years and not burn out/fail.
    That's true But how is it more different for GEM courses? If you get funding for the course fees from student finance and NHS bursaries, how are you going to support yourself? Correct me if I'm wrong, though!
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    (Original post by mzchocolate)
    So just to clarify, 4 year courses are partly paid for by the NHS but you have to pay the first term and other bits n pieces, whereas the 5 year course, you pay 4 years up front ?? Is That right? Cause unless I get fortunately get accepted in a 4 year course in the next few years, I'll never afford a 5 year... who has £36k casually lying around ?!
    You don't have to pay £36k up front you can pay it in 12 instalments (3 times per year) through out the course.
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    (Original post by cyftii)
    That's true But how is it more different for GEM courses? If you get funding for the course fees from student finance and NHS bursaries, how are you going to support yourself? Correct me if I'm wrong, though!
    because the maintenance grants and nhs bursaries add up to nearly 10k a year...? each uni I'm applying to gives me over 8k a year min (one gives my over 11k)
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    (Original post by neuronerd)
    because the maintenance grants and nhs bursaries add up to nearly 10k a year...? each uni I'm applying to gives me over 8k a year min (one gives my over 11k)
    Oh, I see! Well, that's a significant difference for sure
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    (Original post by cyftii)
    Yes, this is true for tuition fees though. I called them twice for the last two weeks to confirm it, and both times they said we are eligible for a maintenance loan. I asked them specifically if I can use it for tuition fees and the answer was positive
    Pretty sure I'd get a maintenance loan of 3.5Kish a year, so if I were at Kings (they say it's £11k to live there for a year), I'd be laying out £16.5k a year to go there. That's more than working minimum wage full time.


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    (Original post by cyftii)
    Yes, this is true for tuition fees though. I called them twice for the last two weeks to confirm it, and both times they said we are eligible for a maintenance loan. I asked them specifically if I can use it for tuition fees and the answer was positive
    You can receive maintenance loans but they are reduced.
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    (Original post by cyftii)
    Yes, this is true for tuition fees though. I called them twice for the last two weeks to confirm it, and both times they said we are eligible for a maintenance loan. I asked them specifically if I can use it for tuition fees and the answer was positive
    Ye you get 1179 per term. But what about living, rent, all that and the fees? And when people do it in London as well!!!?


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