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    (Original post by visesh)
    Back on the topic of snake-oil, check this amazing bit of "holistic practice" out.
    not funny :no:
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    (Original post by lekky)
    not funny :no:
    Edited :yy:
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    I've had incurable cancer for over 10 years. I drastically changed my diet and now look a lot healthier then my 'healthy' friends although I still eat red meat. There is no doubt healthy food helps the body repair and feed it's immune system more efficiently, but a lot of doctors are not interested in discussing this as part of ongoing care.

    Normal cells rely on potassium compounds to make them work efficiently. In the cellular membrane there are ´pumps´ that rely on magnesium to work properly. The pumps push potassium into the cell and pump out sodium. If too much sodium gets into the mitochondria, the energy producing steps start to use sodium instead of potassium - this will still work but not as efficiently. Less oxygen is burned and less energy produced. The waste products will now be sodium salts, which are more ´acid´ than potassium salts. This ´acidity´ in the power stations´ environment then makes the energy production process even less efficient - taking in even less oxygen and producing even less energy. A downward spiral has begun. You are on your way to ill health and even a cancer cell.

    It is also worth noting that until recently, myeloma (a blood cancer, affecting the production of white bloods cells and neutrophils) was virtually unkown in Japan until recent years, where diet is now more Westernised. SymBio Pharamceuticals have also begun a Phase II trial for Bedamustine - an alkylating agent, and is already awaiting approval for relapsed non-Hodgkins.
    :facepalm:
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    (Original post by visesh)
    Edited :yy:
    You didn't have to, that's only me, and only really because it hits a bit too close to home. Thanks though
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    (Original post by lekky)
    You didn't have to, that's only me, and only really because it hits a bit too close to home. Thanks though
    I realised as I typed it that it was in rather bad taste (hence the initial disclaimer) and was in two minds about posting it.
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    (Original post by visesh)
    :facepalm:
    And here's me thinking that I had this physiology stuff figured out. Back to the drawing board.
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    Haha, I like how this forum is now "Current medical student and doctors"
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    **** me, I'm sure I didn't bring nearly this much crap up with me.
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    Gah I want Easter holidays now (althoug I use the word holiday in the loosest possible sense), 2 more weeks to go and we started in the first week of Jan. Bad times.
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    (Original post by visesh)
    Trust me, I absolutely HATED the preclinical course here due to the lack of patient contact, but recently, I've begun to appreciate that time spent poring over Robbins waybackwhen. It's all coming together nicely.
    Whilst I largely agree, I do think the pre-clinical parts of Cambridge could be greatly improved by highlighting the clinical relevance and less emphasis on the frankly purely academic elements of the course (MIMS, I'm looking at you...). I think Newcastle has the balance right.
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    (Original post by visesh)
    :facepalm:
    Someone should tell him it works even better if you take it IV... (JOKING, any GMC lurkers!)

    In other quackery news, I saw a patient yesterday who told me all about her chiropractor. It wouldn't be professional to post my full opinion on here, that will have to wait until the meet, but let's just say I think they should be BANNED from having their own x-ray machines.

    (Original post by No Future)
    Haha, I like how this forum is now "Current medical student and doctors"
    I don't know who changed it, but at least it will shut my fiancé up - he whinges at me for being hypocritical for telling non-medics off for posting in here when "technically" I shouldn't be myself. :rolleyes:

    And finally, because I'm not sure how many people are still checking the thread...

    Medics meet in London on 16th April
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    (Original post by visesh)
    I've had incurable cancer for over 10 years. I drastically changed my diet and now look a lot healthier then my 'healthy' friends although I still eat red meat. There is no doubt healthy food helps the body repair and feed it's immune system more efficiently, but a lot of doctors are not interested in discussing this as part of ongoing care.

    Normal cells rely on potassium compounds to make them work efficiently. In the cellular membrane there are ´pumps´ that rely on magnesium to work properly. The pumps push potassium into the cell and pump out sodium. If too much sodium gets into the mitochondria, the energy producing steps start to use sodium instead of potassium - this will still work but not as efficiently. Less oxygen is burned and less energy produced. The waste products will now be sodium salts, which are more ´acid´ than potassium salts. This ´acidity´ in the power stations´ environment then makes the energy production process even less efficient - taking in even less oxygen and producing even less energy. A downward spiral has begun. You are on your way to ill health and even a cancer cell.

    It is also worth noting that until recently, myeloma (a blood cancer, affecting the production of white bloods cells and neutrophils) was virtually unkown in Japan until recent years, where diet is now more Westernised. SymBio Pharamceuticals have also begun a Phase II trial for Bedamustine - an alkylating agent, and is already awaiting approval for relapsed non-Hodgkins.
    :facepalm:
    wow. from errors in chemistry to cellular metabolism that has it all
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    (Original post by Captain Crash)
    Whilst I largely agree, I do think the pre-clinical parts of Cambridge could be greatly improved by highlighting the clinical relevance and less emphasis on the frankly purely academic elements of the course (MIMS, I'm looking at you...). I think Newcastle has the balance right.
    I liked MIMs... its just annoying learning a list of drugs that aren't of any use...
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    (Original post by It could be lupus)
    I liked MIMs... its just annoying learning a list of drugs that aren't of any use...
    Has the terminology changed? I'm referring to biochemistry in first year (Molecules in Medical Science). AFAIK we didn't touch on drugs then....

    Pharm was more useful, but still with overly academic bits.
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    (Original post by Captain Crash)
    Has the terminology changed? I'm referring to biochemistry in first year (Molecules in Medical Science). AFAIK we didn't touch on drugs then....

    Pharm was more useful, but still with overly academic bits.
    Yeah sorry it hasn't. I liked MIMs last year but this year I'm just getting annoyed at Pharm/MODA due to all the long lists of useless drugs. I can see how all the mechanisms are useful to know though
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    (Original post by It could be lupus)
    Yeah sorry it hasn't. I liked MIMs last year but this year I'm just getting annoyed at Pharm/MODA due to all the long lists of useless drugs. I can see how all the mechanisms are useful to know though
    by useless drugs what are we talking? historical (like curare etc), now largely defunct clinically (like trimetaphan etc) or only useful in research (oubain, reserpine, triethylcholine* etc)
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    (Original post by John Locke)
    by useless drugs what are we talking? historical (like curare etc), now largely defunct clinically (like trimetaphan etc) or only useful in research (oubain, reserpine, triethylcholinium etc)
    Generally historical or those that where discovered but never passed clinical trials with a few being for research. I think its just that I want to learn things that will be useful as a doctor i.e. drugs in clinical use.
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    To be honest, while MODA might feel a little obsolete, it's a good course. A few more lectures on antimicrobials (well, not cramming them all into 6 lectures) might be a little more useful though. You get the hang of proper drugs in a few weeks once you start on the wards. It's the mechanisms that are important, not the drugs themselves. FWIW, you get more "clinical pharmacology" lectures in 4th year.
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    (Original post by John Locke)
    by useless drugs what are we talking? historical (like curare etc), now largely defunct clinically (like trimetaphan etc) or only useful in research (oubain, reserpine, triethylcholine* etc)
    Think propranolol as *the* beta-blocker.
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    (Original post by visesh)
    To be honest, while MODA might feel a little obsolete, it's a good course. A few more lectures on antimicrobials (well, not cramming them all into 6 lectures) might be a little more useful though. You get the hang of proper drugs in a few weeks once you start on the wards. It's the mechanisms that are important, not the drugs themselves. FWIW, you get more "clinical pharmacology" lectures in 4th year.
    The article on lowering your pH has been removed now...
 
 
 
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