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    (Original post by lekky)
    Yeah that's not the kind of thing you'd call someone out on unless you are more than 100% certain. Could be very detrimental, even if not bipolar there are clearly some issues there. I can try and casually ask my tutor if they'd ever diagnose someone with bipolar but I'm sure he's mentioned diagnosising patients with such things before & management without any kind of referral.
    You could say something like - as your current medication only seems to be making things worse, do you think you should make another appointment?
    Yeah that's definitely what I'd do. I would be really tactful, but I want to know whether she's taken the appropriate steps or not before I'd say anything. Basically I want to work out the right way of doing it and to do that I think I'll have to know whether or not what she's done is right. I'd suggest to her that she should perhaps ask for a referral at her GP by making an appointment, rather than saying "You can't have been diagnosed properly".
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    Well you have to meet in London the day after I've left home for Bath don't you, swines
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    Last weekend of freedom... :bawling:

    Baking my husband a birthday cake.
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Early patient contact is a waste of time. It's just making small talk with patients slipping in the odd buzz word/jargon that we don't really know much about. Time in bed is much more productive.
    Agree
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    I'm a bit late but I think one point that many of you missed in the traditional vs non-traditional debate is that even if one is better than the other, that doesn't mean it's better for everyone. If someone hates being couped up in a classroom all the time they might find it very difficult getting through pre-clin and might flunk out because of it. Then again, many people complain about the lack of direction they're given on their courses and sometimes regret not going for traditional.

    So basically, if one course turns out to be better than the other in producing good doctors this doesn't mean all courses should be changed to that particular style otherwise you might just get a bunch of de-motivated people put into a position of great responsibility. Don't you guys keep telling people in the applicants forum "choose the course that's right for you"? Surely if you all think yours is undoubtedly the best then you wouldn't even be saying this.
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    Uhhh OSCEs in two weeks. How did you guys revise for them? Reading out the books; practising on people? Anything special and exciting?
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    1 week left until Easter! which also means revision
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    (Original post by theredsox)
    Uhhh OSCEs in two weeks. How did you guys revise for them? Reading out the books; practising on people? Anything special and exciting?
    I watched podcasts then practised on people.
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    So a few weeks back, we had a mock for our finals. This is one of the questions:

    "A women is noticed to have decreasing performance at work and increased tardiness.

    Which of the following tests would most determine her condition?

    a)Blood film
    b)White Cell Count
    c)MCV
    d)ESR
    e)Platlet count"

    :eek: I, and everyone I spoke to, were completely puzzled by this question with no-one 100% clear of the answer. Anyone any clues?
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    (Original post by theredsox)
    Uhhh OSCEs in two weeks. How did you guys revise for them? Reading out the books; practising on people? Anything special and exciting?
    For just practicing technique, if there aren't any people around, teddy bears are great, as are cushions (especially for abdo - stick random objects underneath to use as palpable masses).
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    (Original post by Captain Crash)
    So a few weeks back, we had a mock for our finals. This is one of the questions:

    "A women is noticed to have decreasing performance at work and increased tardiness.

    Which of the following tests would most determine her condition?

    a)Blood film
    b)White Cell Count
    c)MCV
    d)ESR
    e)Platlet count"

    :eek: I, and everyone I spoke to, were completely puzzled by this question with no-one 100% clear of the answer. Anyone any clues?
    She was clearly a drunk. So, MCV or the higher-yield blood film?
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    (Original post by Captain Crash)
    So a few weeks back, we had a mock for our finals. This is one of the questions:

    "A women is noticed to have decreasing performance at work and increased tardiness.

    Which of the following tests would most determine her condition?

    a)Blood film
    b)White Cell Count
    c)MCV
    d)ESR
    e)Platlet count"

    :eek: I, and everyone I spoke to, were completely puzzled by this question with no-one 100% clear of the answer. Anyone any clues?
    My only thought is anaemia? Would cause tiredness, so trouble getting up in the morning so late for work, and decreased concentration during the day... So either a blood film or MCV?
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    Mate, we had an entire question on CLL, erythroderma, male infertility and a bunch of other crap on our finals. Leicester is truly ridiculous.
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    (Original post by visesh)
    She was clearly a drunk. So, MCV or the higher-yield blood film?
    Differential also include leukaemia, PMR (or something rheumatological) and anaemia (from speaking to other people), which would have necessitated different answers.

    But yeah, even if she was a drunk, which answer would be correct - blood film or MCV?
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    I really think/hope that that sort of question would get filtered as it was pretty damned ambiguous (and my previous response was pretty TIC). That was definitely one of the few questions I'm sure I got wrong. Incidentally, although that paper was definitely the easiest of the three, I was quite surprised to see the year-group mean for that paper to be that high, 79%? :eek:
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    (Original post by Captain Crash)
    Differential also include leukaemia, PMR (or something rheumatological) and anaemia (from speaking to other people), which would have necessitated different answers.

    But yeah, even if she was a drunk, which answer would be correct - blood film or MCV?
    blood film may be more likely to rule in leukaemia I guess, whilst still being useful to diagnose anaemia?
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    http://www.rsm.ac.uk/students/stb20.php

    Any other Landaners getting on this? Me and a flatmate are going with a few others, then plan to get pissed afterwards with or without other medics.
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    (Original post by Captain Crash)
    So a few weeks back, we had a mock for our finals. This is one of the questions:

    "A women is noticed to have decreasing performance at work and increased tardiness.

    Which of the following tests would most determine her condition?
    Sleep study!

    She's probably a bloater who's TFTB.
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    http://www.rsm.ac.uk/students/stb20.php

    Any other Landaners getting on this? Me and a flatmate are going with a few others, then plan to get pissed afterwards with or without other medics.
    That is absolutely not what I was expecting it to be.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    Sleep study!

    She's probably a bloater who's TFTB.
    Too fat to breathe? :confused:
 
 
 
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