Turn on thread page Beta

Are BTECs for the people who aren't smart enough to do A Levels? watch

Announcements
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    my 10 pence: i've just done a business/marketing BTEC and came out with MM (CC) however it was enough to get an unconditional uni offer and i must say, it was 100x harder than my English lang A-level.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AidanLunn)
    Technically it is a University. *Technically*. "College" always means just that to me - a college. If it's a University then why don't they call it that?

    Many people who repair electronic equipment aren't officially qualified. Repairing and building electronic circuits is mostly practical work and relies on experience.

    Let's just say that I have learnt much more about computers on my own or through employment than I would have doing an A-level.

    The point of doing something is if you can do it or not, not whether you have qualifications to do it.

    The point about making such basic electronic items when I was 10 was to demonstrate how much you learn through courses and experience that are more practical than theoretical.

    PS, I didn't even mention a University degree, I was talking about BTECs and A-levels.
    Sorry buddy, but you are showing an insane level of ignorance here and it really isn't helping your cause.

    For a start, Imperial is one of the best universities in the country for engineering and sciences. Secondly, you are inferring that somebody on an electrical engineering degree is essentially learning to be a technician. For this I don't blame you entirely as this country has an issue with calling everyone an 'engineer'. Now, this BTEC in engineering is more practical and hence I gather that it is engineering in the technician sense of the word. A degree contains a high level of mathematics that a simple technician (a fixer/maintainer of components) will neither understand nor care about.

    An engineer is not a technician. People do not study at a top university to get a job that some no-mark who failed to get 5 GCSE passes and did a BTEC can do.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by specialk_698)
    you seem misinformed, university educated and accredited electrical and electronic engineers do not repair faulty wiring in houses, they provide the infrastructure for electricity amongst other things on whole streets, for cities and skyscrapers etc... they will oversee the implementation of this but do not 'get their hands dirty' as its so practical as you seem to suggest.

    the course is practical in that it has a practical use not in that electical engineers will be physically fixing loose wires etc.

    your analogy is ridiculous and just shows you have no idea what an electronic and electrical engineer does.
    I know very well what they do thank you. I myself have built and repaired computers, TVs, DVD players etc. I work with some electronic engineers.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by WithFlyingColours)
    Sorry buddy, but you are showing an insane level of ignorance here and it really isn't helping your cause.

    For a start, Imperial is one of the best universities in the country for engineering and sciences. Secondly, you are inferring that somebody on an electrical engineering degree is essentially learning to be a technician. For this I don't blame you entirely as this country has an issue with calling everyone an 'engineer'. Now, this BTEC in engineering is more practical and hence I gather that it is engineering in the technician sense of the word. A degree contains a high level of mathematics that a simple technician (a fixer/maintainer of components) will neither understand nor care about.

    An engineer is not a technician. People do not study at a top university to get a job that some no-mark who failed to get 5 GCSE passes and did a BTEC can do.
    1) I am considering a change of career to electronic engineering anyway. 2) I am far less ignorant than you think and than I make out. 3) I have designed electrical circuits totally on my own. 4) I may be a little dim, but that is not my fault. I fail to see how it is. Don't have a go at people who can't help whatever you are having a go at them for.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AidanLunn)
    1) I am considering a change of career to electronic engineering anyway. 2) I am far less ignorant than you think and than I make out. 3) I have designed electrical circuits totally on my own. 4) I may be a little dim, but that is not my fault. I fail to see how it is. Don't have a go at people who can't help whatever you are having a go at them for.
    Your comments regarding Imperial College were ignorant though pal, generally if you don't know about something try not to comment. That's a simple rule I go by and it hasn't failed me as of yet.

    I do not question what you can and can't do. What I question is how you think that BTEC in any way is parallel to a BEng from a reputable university.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AidanLunn)
    I know very well what they do thank you. I myself have built and repaired computers, TVs, DVD players etc. I work with some electronic engineers.
    Ahh yeah but you still aren't understanding what he's saying. He's correctly making the point that engineering graduates do not do build and repair electronics. The electrical engineers you speak of are probably technicians, and do not act as chartered engineers doing things that chartered engineers do. A chartered engineer does not do the practical things (in your sense of the word practical). They do not get their hands dirty. These are people who are proficient mathematicians, not people who are good with their hands.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by WithFlyingColours)
    I do not question what you can and can't do. What I question is how you think that BTEC in any way is parallel to a BEng from a reputable university.
    If you read one of my later comments, I pointed out that I was comparing A-levels with BTECS, not a BEng or an MEng with BTECs. there wouldn't be any point in doing that as they are two different stages of education.

    That's like comparing Key Stage 2 with a Postgraduate degree.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by WithFlyingColours)
    Ahh yeah but you still aren't understanding what he's saying. He's correctly making the point that engineering graduates do not do build and repair electronics. The electrical engineers you speak of are probably technicians, and do not act as chartered engineers doing things that chartered engineers do. A chartered engineer does not do the practical things (in your sense of the word practical). They do not get their hands dirty. These are people who are proficient mathematicians, not people who are good with their hands.
    Well i agree with what you say, but my point still stands though.

    And I have dabbled with building my own electronic circuits. My own PAL colour decoder, for example. However, this relied on comparing the usual Telefunken-developed PAL decoder and the version used on the first Sony colour sets sold here in the early 70s (an NTSC colour decoder adapted for PAL, using a 64-microsecond delay line to store every other line, repeating the same line twice, unlike proper PAL. Hanover bars and slightly mis-matched tints/hues on the picture are the result. It used two piezo crystals IIRC. I don't have the time to remove the numerous screws on the back of the set and disassemble the whole thing to see, but I'm pretty sure it did.) My point being that I created my own PAL decoder using a combination of both. As analogue broadcasting (and therefore PAL) is on its way out anyway, I created this purely for fun and curiosity.

    But seeing as I more or less created this by trial and error, I suppose you're right.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AidanLunn)
    If you read one of my later comments, I pointed out that I was comparing A-levels with BTECS, not a BEng or an MEng with BTECs. there wouldn't be any point in doing that as they are two different stages of education.

    That's like comparing Key Stage 2 with a Postgraduate degree.
    This is where I started to see you alluding to degrees and comparing degrees to BTEC: Seeing as most electronic engineering jobs require practical skills, the A-level would be of much less use than a BTEC in this subject.

    Here, you're showing that you think that electronic engineering is the fixing of components. To become an electronic engineer (a proper one, not a technician who calls himself an engineer) you need to do an MEng. To get on to that you will need an A level in maths and possibly physics as well (at most universities). You are essentially comparing the BTEC with a degree as A levels are only a means with which to study a degree, if you want to become an electronic/electrical engineer.

    (Original post by girly2)
    4. Difficulty level depends on what BTEC is done which is why Medical Science is harder than A-level Science.
    Award for the most illogical comment I've ever seen on TSR goes to you, congratulations. I've seen some corkers but this one takes the biscuit.

    How is what you've said a reason for why BTEC medical science is harder than A level chemistry/physics/biology? There isn't some difficulty setting on a BTEC where you can higher it up to 'harder than A level'.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AidanLunn)
    Well i agree with what you say, but my point still stands though.

    And I have dabbled with building my own electronic circuits. My own PAL colour decoder, for example. However, this relied on comparing the usual Telefunken-developed PAL decoder and the version used on the first Sony colour sets sold here in the early 70s (an NTSC colour decoder adapted for PAL, using a 64-microsecond delay line to store every other line, repeating the same line twice, unlike proper PAL. Hanover bars and slightly mis-matched tints/hues on the picture are the result. It used two piezo crystals IIRC. I don't have the time to remove the numerous screws on the back of the set and disassemble the whole thing to see, but I'm pretty sure it did.) My point being that I created my own PAL decoder using a combination of both. As analogue broadcasting (and therefore PAL) is on its way out anyway, I created this purely for fun and curiosity.

    But seeing as I more or less created this by trial and error, I suppose you're right.
    I'm not taking away from what you've done, as quite frankly I've never looked into the inner workings of TVs etc. All I'm saying is that this isn't the sort of thing a university educated electronic engineer does. What you can do is a practical skill, it isn't electronic engineering in the true sense of the word, it's what a technician does. This is what I'm imagining an electronic engineering BTEC goes into.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    YES-summed up in a word
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hottie-a-fola)
    YES-summed up in a word
    NOPE
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Having studied, A-Levels and BTEC, (choosing BTEC because I wanted to only study Business) I would say the people who think this, need to overlook their stereotypical perspectives of life. They are both very challenging in their own way. A-Levels, I didn't see as "full" on as BTEC.
    With A-Levels, I would have an hour lesson, get 20 sheets of photocopied material, and expect to understand it.
    With BTEC, we were given various different types of material, and it was explained to us, in the lesson, and we were then sent off to do a 3 week assignment on a specific subject. These assignment can get up 70 pages+, depending on the unit which you are studying.

    Therefore I found that there was a lot more work to be doing in the BTEC course, than there was in the equivalent A-Level.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I was not quoting any one but the thread it self is totally wrong. I thought any one would have been able to distinguish that!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ak56)
    The choice of BTEC courses on offer appear substantially less rigerious than what is available at A Level, for example, things such as Games Development, which I can only imagine is little more than pissing around with a few 2D games and at the end of it getting a qualification that is supossedly worth 3 A Levels - what a total farce!

    I suppose if you're lazy and uninterested in academics, but still want to pretend to be qualified, then the BTEC system is a dream, but if like me you are highly academic, wish to get somewhere in life and have real qualifications to go along with it, then the A Level system is the only way to go.

    In fairness, I don't believe the BTEC system should be completely dropped, however I think it should be there to serve the lower academically able people, and anyone doing a Level 3 BTEC should be expected to do a least one A Level alongside it.
    I find this argument disgusting. It is, without a doubt, the most arrogant post I have seen on here. Only a person with such narrow-mindedness could post this. You state everything as if it were fact.

    Surely, someone such as yourself, an 'academic, intelligent person' would respectfully not use language such as 'retard'. This really weakens your argument and makes it seem more like a mockery rather than a respectable debate.

    I have pursued a couple of BTECs (at GCSE-level) - not by choice - due to the high enforcement-level at my school. Although I do not like them because I feel like they underprepare me, that does not adapt to everyone's nature. I consider myself academic, but do not think the BTEC qualification is for 'retards' and not for those who want to 'get somewhere in life' - an appalling statement.

    Let people do what they want to do - let them learn if they make the wrong choices with subject, or celebrate if they have succeeded; open up to the fact that people have different calibres, and that success is related to perception, not facts. I aim for Oxford University and King's College, London; aspire for all A and A* grades at GCSE. I have done some BTECs, but just like to aim high. I am, by no means, naturally gifted, but consider myself as an academic person with a thirst for knowledge.

    Grow up and crawl out of your cave.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Some of the people on here are thouroughly ignorant and the fact that they are so self absorbed and ridiculously outspoken makes me very angry...

    My father studied a BTEC alongside physics A level.. guess what? He's in MENSA. He has his own business which turns over a ridiculous amount of money per annum. Remove your heads from your sphincters.

    I'm studing a BTEC ND in engineering alongside A level physics. I also have AS mathematics. I'm anything but a retard and will get into a very good university and (hopefully) gain a first class honours in an engineering degree. I'm aiming to achieve D/D/D in my diploma and an A in A2 physics. I already have an A in AS maths.

    Stop being so elitist FFS.
    Offline

    13
    (Original post by tommydeaks)
    Some of the people on here are thouroughly ignorant and the fact that they are so self absorbed and ridiculously outspoken makes me very angry...

    My father studied a BTEC alongside physics A level.. guess what? He's in MENSA. He has his own business which turns over a ridiculous amount of money per annum. Remove your heads from your sphincters.

    I'm studing a BTEC ND in engineering alongside A level physics. I also have AS mathematics. I'm anything but a retard and will get into a very good university and (hopefully) gain a first class honours in an engineering degree. I'm aiming to achieve D/D/D in my diploma and an A in A2 physics. I already have an A in AS maths.

    Stop being so elitist FFS.
    Mensa really means nothing, but I do appreciate the fact he's running his own business and making a good use of himself. :yep:

    Btw, I would argue, if you really wanted to get onto a top engineering course, e.g. from Imperial, doing Maths, Physics and Further Maths would've suited you better compared to a BTEC in Enigneering?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Have you ever thought some people don't want to go to such institutions? While I appreciate some people want to go to places such as oxbridge or imperial, I want to go somewhere that would suit me. Oxford, cambridge or imperial would most certainly not suit me. I want to go somewhere that will fulfill my personal goals aswell as my academic goals.
    And surely the fact my dad's in mensa proves he isn't a retard... albeit it doesn't mean too much...

    I chose to study a BTEC national. Why? Because I wanted to. Branding me as a retard it elitist and snobbish.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    Nope. My mate got A-B's and 2 C's on his GCSES and then AABB at AS levels. He then dropped out and did a BTEC, say's it's the best thing he's ever done.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by im so academic)
    I'm surprised at the amount of politically correctness in this thread.

    I'm going to say something very un-PC, but nevertheless true.

    Of course the academic A-levels are better! Further Maths, Chemistry, Physics, History etc can NOT be compared to some BTEC in Art or Sport or Tourism or whatever.
    Unfair comparison there. What about contrasting a BTEC in Engineering, Business or Comp. Sci., to say A-levels in Dance, Media or Art?

    (Original post by im so academic)
    In fact, I think they're quite pointless to a certain extent.

    Whether BTECs are for retards - yes in a way. Yes in the sense that if you can't do academic subjects, apparently you're "better" learning vocationally. Not give me this PC crap - they were just too retarded to understand the content in the most academic of A-levels.
    Who said BTECs are exclusively for people more vocationally inclined than academic? I myself did a BTEC because I couldn't be bothered to continue going to school 5 days a week and continue to be treated like a child. It was far less stressful (in regard to pressure from teachers and working hours) and it also seemed to get me to where I wanted to be, so it seemed like I had made a rather pragmatic decision in choosing a BTEC. My GCSEs more than covered the criteria to do A-levels - in fact, my GCSEs were higher than the vast majority of students who choose to do A-levels, and probably higher than yours too. So, if I'm "too retarded" to understand the content of A-levels, then I assume most people who actually do them are too.

    Funnily enough, at my interview at UCL (yes, with a BTEC I got an interview at UCL and subsequently an offer), the bloke told me that BTECs have consistently produced more successful people on that course than A-levels had. He claimed that it tends to prepare his students better for his degree. Take from that which you wish. My point is, they are not pointless to an extent - far from it. If they were pointless I wouldn't have received several offers to study at the best universities in the world. If they were pointless, then they wouldn't have existed for the last 80 years. If they were pointless, then by definition of the word, I'd have nothing to do next year. And yet, I'm going on to better things than most A-level students are.

    Now I very rarely come on these boards, but every single time I do, I always have to endure reading a whole bunch of your underhanded, obnoxious babble. I also very rarely get personal, but I feel the need to here -- for your sake and everybody elses. At first, I thought you were trolling for neg rep, but now I see that you have hidden your rep - presumably because you're ashamed of it - so I can therefore only assume that the explanation for your consistent stupidity is that you are simply a rubbish person. Seriously, have some self-awareness and revise your approach to people, or you'll continue to be hated forever.

    You suck. Grow up.
 
 
 

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    All Departments Open 13:00-17:00. Find out more about our diverse range of subject areas and career progression in the Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences, Medicine & Health Sciences, and the Sciences. Postgraduate
    Wed, 30 Jan '19
  • Aston University
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Wed, 30 Jan '19
  • Solent University
    Careers in maritime Undergraduate
    Sat, 2 Feb '19
Poll
Brexit: Given the chance now, would you vote leave or remain?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.