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    (Original post by physicis)
    Dont worry guys you did not have to cosnider the number of wheels at all in the question. I specificaly though of this in the exam and reread the question all it asked for was the area in contact with the floor. No consideration of the number of wheels was necessary at all.

    1200g=pressure1 x area1

    1200g=pressure2 x area2

    change area1-area2
    Thank god.
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    Even if there were thousands of wheels, the total increase of area of contact would still be the same proportion, I think. As long as all the wheels are identical with same specific heat capacities, etc. Thinking back about the question, the amount of wheels shouldn't be an issue.

    Although, I can't be sure. I can't remember what the whole question referred to! I remember it asking about one particular wheel, whether there were any more to be considered... We'll need the paper again, I guess.
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    (Original post by physicis)
    Dont worry guys you did not have to cosnider the number of wheels at all in the question. I specificaly though of this in the exam and reread the question all it asked for was the area in contact with the floor. No consideration of the number of wheels was necessary at all.

    1200g=pressure1 x area1

    1200g=pressure2 x area2

    change area1-area2
    You sure? 0; I hope you're right xD
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    The 4 wheels didn't matter in the end because if you didn't divide by 4 to get the force per wheel then you wouldn't have timesed by four to get the total area gained
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    (Original post by Political Cake)
    Even if there were thousands of wheels, the total increase of area of contact would still be the same proportion, I think. As long as all the wheels are identical with same specific heat capacities, etc. Thinking back about the question, the amount of wheels shouldn't be an issue.

    Although, I can't be sure. I can't remember what the whole question referred to! I remember it asking about one particular wheel, whether there were any more to be considered... We'll need the paper again, I guess.
    I went thorugh this so many times in the exam, it didnt even mention the word wheels. All it asked for was the "area in contact with the floor"
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    Is anyone doing an unofficial mark scheme?


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    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...9#post43252049

    Unofficial mark scheme
    :beard:
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    (Original post by JustFacts)
    I thought it went pretty well. The only question I'm sure I dropped marks in was the last one. For the change in area question did you guys get something like 5*10-3. And for the for change in velocity question did you guys get 3.2, with the area under the graph being 8 so 8 divided by the mass. And for the example of resonance in everyday life I said tuning a radio, not sure if that is every day though.
    Yeah I got 5.3x10^-3 for the change of area
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    (Original post by theslav)
    What if the car had three wheels?

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    It was irrelevant as to whether you had to divide by 4 or 3 as it was the total contact area; but imagine the bane of an exam if the examiners cars were all reliant robins with 3 wheels :|
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    Thank you!


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    Does anybody have the paper? If so would they kindly upload?
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    On 4a i divided by the density for some reason hw many marks will i lose. Is there ecf for following questions

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    in the moles question, for some reason I went all chemistry and divided the volume by 24000 so I'm a huge power of 10 out, will I lose all of the marks?
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    I think this is the easiest paper ever so the grade boundary will be higher.
    54/60 to get an A, anyone agree??
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    (Original post by EZCS)
    I think this is the easiest paper ever so the grade boundary will be higher.
    54/60 to get an A, anyone agree??
    I agree with you being the easiest paper, however 54 is far too high.
    The highest it has ever been is 48 and therefore i reckon 50 MAX for an A.
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    What do you think for a C?


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    The grade boundaries are going to be skyhigh. Everyone I spoke to (including those in my class who struggle with physics) said they found it very straightforward, even the "stretch and challenge" questions like the last one calculating the increase in pressure.

    Easiest G484 paper to date in my opinion.

    I reckon 50 for an A, and then down in increments of about 3 (so B=47, C=44 etc).

    And bare in mind that G484 is always marked very tightly to the mark scheme, so people may lose marks on the few written questions.
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    (Original post by tooty_fruit)
    The grade boundaries are going to be skyhigh. Everyone I spoke to (including those in my class who struggle with physics) said they found it very straightforward, even the "stretch and challenge" questions like the last one calculating the increase in pressure.

    Easiest G484 paper to date in my opinion.

    I reckon 50 for an A, and then down in increments of about 3 (so B=47, C=44 etc).

    And bare in mind that G484 is always marked very tightly to the mark scheme, so people may lose marks on the few written questions.
    44 :O :'( ah give up with physics


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    Lets say I got 38 in this paper but I got A/A* in course work what could I get this paper?


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    (Original post by Hannahm1995)
    44 :O :'( ah give up with physics


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    Bare in mind that's just my estimation :P

    It could well be a lot lower, I was just basing it on my/my classes experience!

    If the boundaries go down in 4's then you'll be better placed anyway.
 
 
 
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