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    (Original post by antonia95)
    What sort of vague structure would you follow for this essay?
    [QUOTE=cornflaked;42928517
    Questions I've come up with/re-worked from previous papers:
    Lear -
    By considering the dramatic effects of the play, evulate the view that throughout 'King Lear', 'Disguises are used in the play by only honest characters.' [/QUOTE]

    What sort of vague structure would you follow for this essay?

    My initial reaction is that it seems sorta contradictory - a disguise conceals one's identity therefore you're deceiving others, which isn't honest. On the other hand, you can just talk about the intentions of the characters that use disguises. In my intro, I'd probably say something like: 'while it seems contradictory (or paradoxical - if that's the correct word?), it is important to consider that the intentions of the characters do come across as positive and that they are instrumental in the play'.

    Is it just Edgar/Poor Tom and Kent/Caius that use disguises? In which case, I'd do a paragraph on each and another paragraph on something else which I can't think of right now

    I'd probably put in a Marxist reading saying how both Edgar and Kent (assuming they're the only one with disguises) disguise themselves as members of society who were much lower in status (bring in natural order for AO4) yet they earn the trust of characters who are much higher (e.g. when Lear appoints Poor Tom as a judge in his 'mock trial' is indicative of this).

    I'd conclude saying that Edgar's/Poor Tom's role relies heavily on contrast to create the dramatic effect, more so than Kent. They were also forced to use disguises in order to help those they love. I'd ultimately say they are honest characters, despite their intentions.
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    (Original post by Beth_Armitage)
    Anyone doing marvell and volpone? Got any good links between them? thnx
    It depends on what poem you choose to write about, because there are thematic links but also some quite strong links between the language. E.G you can compare 'A Picture Of Little TC' with Volpone, because both present virtuous characters fighting against lust or, as Marvell puts it 'Wanton Love'. You can also compare 'To His Coy Mistress' with Volpone's attempted seduction of Celia. When talking about faith/veneration you can compare the PURITY of the drop of dew's faith in heaven with the BASENESS of Volpone's veneration for his gold - "Thou being the best of things, and far transcending/All style of joy in children, parents, friends/Or any other waking dream on earth". There is also a brilliant link between Volpone's language after he sees Celia - 'O, I am wounded!' and the language about Juliana in 'Damon The Mower' - 'Only for him no cure is found/Whom Juliana's eyes do wound'. Thus a link of them being WOUNDED by their love for a woman - which has themes of MISOGYNY and LUST and is also influenced by classical tradition.
    Hope this helps! xx
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    Also, just double checking because my teacher hasn't prepared us very well, when it says write about ONE TEXT in the comparison essay, if we have studied Marvell and looked at, say, 15 poems, does that mean we only write about 1 poem?
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    SOOO many quotes Ahhhhhh! I'm doing Ant and Cleo, Tis Pity, and WOB if anyone cares haha
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    (Original post by ann2013)
    Hello,

    Has anyone got any advice on how to structure both essays..? I'm struggling to plan this:

    By exploring the dramatic presentation of Octavius in 'Antony and Cleopatra', evaluate the view that he is 'too calculating to be seen either as hero or villain'.

    I've written an essay about this
    I started out by outlining how Caesar could be seen as a villain - he lied to Antony about Lepidus being 'too cruel' and he wants to lead Cleopatra in triumph.
    I then presented a critic quote about Caesar being 'high on the wheel of fortune' at the time of Actium - thus he is simply riding on good fortune rather than engineering the situations which benefit him.
    I then used this to counter the argument that he was a villain - as with Lepidus he was simply using the situation (of Lepidus not being an important member of the triumvirate) to his own gain, as Rome did not lose out at all by his disposal of Lepidus.
    Also, he would have been expected to lead Cleopatra in triumph, otherwise he would not have gained respect as new emperor of Rome.
    His reaction at Antony's death, and also his reaction to Cleopatra's, appear to show genuine sympathy (though there is debate as to whether he was simply putting on a show for his men, especially after Antony's death)
    I concluded by saying that while he could not be seen as a villain, he could also not be seen as a hero, as he was 'Fortune's knave' as Cleopatra put it.
    Hope this helps!!
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    (Original post by ann2013)
    Hello,

    Has anyone got any advice on how to structure both essays..? I'm struggling to plan this:

    By exploring the dramatic presentation of Octavius in 'Antony and Cleopatra', evaluate the view that he is 'too calculating to be seen either as hero or villain'.

    Hi , we did this type of essay in class and my teacher said its worth pointing out Caesar's political manipulation of Antony and Octavia's marriage. Also there is the fact that he never has a soliloquy in the play so we are actually never aware of his true motivations, but his control and deviousness is always hinted at such as his removal of Lepidus and how he wants to claim Cleopatra as a trophy which is why she commits suicide. Hope this helps


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    (Original post by Pavzky)

    My initial reaction is that it seems sorta contradictory - a disguise conceals one's identity therefore you're deceiving others, which isn't honest. On the other hand, you can just talk about the intentions of the characters that use disguises. In my intro, I'd probably say something like: 'while it seems contradictory (or paradoxical - if that's the correct word?), it is important to consider that the intentions of the characters do come across as positive and that they are instrumental in the play'.

    Is it just Edgar/Poor Tom and Kent/Caius that use disguises? In which case, I'd do a paragraph on each and another paragraph on something else which I can't think of right now

    I'd probably put in a Marxist reading saying how both Edgar and Kent (assuming they're the only one with disguises) disguise themselves as members of society who were much lower in status (bring in natural order for AO4) yet they earn the trust of characters who are much higher (e.g. when Lear appoints Poor Tom as a judge in his 'mock trial' is indicative of this).

    I'd conclude saying that Edgar's/Poor Tom's role relies heavily on contrast to create the dramatic effect, more so than Kent. They were also forced to use disguises in order to help those they love. I'd ultimately say they are honest characters, despite their intentions.
    Yes I was thinking something similar, and also how i might possibly talk about Lear being disguised - his brutal actions at the beginning may be a front - his decent into madness in the storm and how his loss of clothes - which allow him to sympathise with Edgar allow him to see the view point of the lower classes (royal clothes representing kingship and power)
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    Does anybody have any essays on Antony and Cleopatra that they wouldn't mind sharing? It's the one I'm most nervous about and I think it would help just to get a flavour of how other people are writing them!
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    (Original post by binxgillam)
    It depends on what poem you choose to write about, because there are thematic links but also some quite strong links between the language. E.G you can compare 'A Picture Of Little TC' with Volpone, because both present virtuous characters fighting against lust or, as Marvell puts it 'Wanton Love'. You can also compare 'To His Coy Mistress' with Volpone's attempted seduction of Celia. When talking about faith/veneration you can compare the PURITY of the drop of dew's faith in heaven with the BASENESS of Volpone's veneration for his gold - "Thou being the best of things, and far transcending/All style of joy in children, parents, friends/Or any other waking dream on earth". There is also a brilliant link between Volpone's language after he sees Celia - 'O, I am wounded!' and the language about Juliana in 'Damon The Mower' - 'Only for him no cure is found/Whom Juliana's eyes do wound'. Thus a link of them being WOUNDED by their love for a woman - which has themes of MISOGYNY and LUST and is also influenced by classical tradition.
    Hope this helps! xx
    (Original post by binxgillam)
    Also, just double checking because my teacher hasn't prepared us very well, when it says write about ONE TEXT in the comparison essay, if we have studied Marvell and looked at, say, 15 poems, does that mean we only write about 1 poem?

    Really really really helpful thanks My teacher said to aim for at least 4 poems till about 8 compare. We've only learnt around 6 in class & 2 independent (I.e. not really learnt/don't understand) so I'm gonna have fun...
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    (Original post by pjb95)
    Ah thank you that's really helpful, have you been given any exam questions focused on death?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    For Antony and Cleopatra? We did how love, loyalty and betrayal are highlighted by Shakespeare's use of death. I looked at the three themes in each paragraph!

    For Blake and Webster we did 'To see the skull beneath the skin' how do both writers explore death. I looked at awareness of death, society's presentation of death and treatment of life and death.
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    Hi guys!
    Im doing the tempest, The rivals and wob but im finding it really hard to get critics for all three to be honest... can anyone help me out? Also my teachers aren't being very helpful with my essays .. I keep getting around 20 and if I get 20 in both essays in the real thing, that's a C and I NEED at least a B in this exam and now im starting to panic! I know my A01 is good and I can structure my essays well, and I put about 8 quotes in my essays and maybe refer to an A04 point once or twice - can anyone give me advice on how to be getting at least 25 ... ?Im not sure if I trust my teachers' marking anyway because they give me 20 and then only tell me that I need to add more quotes but surely I must be doing other things wrong too if im losing 10 marks for it? HELP PLEASE (
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    (Original post by butterflylights)
    Does anybody have any essays on Antony and Cleopatra that they wouldn't mind sharing? It's the one I'm most nervous about and I think it would help just to get a flavour of how other people are writing them!
    I do I've taken pictures of it because it's handwritten (I hope my writing is legible hahah) and I only got 26 out of 30 because I didn't include enough contextual knowledge to satisfy A04. The question was about the effects of emotion on the characters' decisions in the play.
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    (Original post by sam_starryeyed)
    Hi guys!
    Im doing the tempest, The rivals and wob but im finding it really hard to get critics for all three to be honest... can anyone help me out? Also my teachers aren't being very helpful with my essays .. I keep getting around 20 and if I get 20 in both essays in the real thing, that's a C and I NEED at least a B in this exam and now im starting to panic! I know my A01 is good and I can structure my essays well, and I put about 8 quotes in my essays and maybe refer to an A04 point once or twice - can anyone give me advice on how to be getting at least 25 ... ?Im not sure if I trust my teachers' marking anyway because they give me 20 and then only tell me that I need to add more quotes but surely I must be doing other things wrong too if im losing 10 marks for it? HELP PLEASE (
    Panicking is the worst thing to do! Take a breath. You will be fine. It is likely that your teacher is marking you more harshly than the examiner will, but I will give you some general pointers, even though my texts are different to yours. The examiner will mark positively, and be looking for certain criteria, so if you make sure you use, for example, words like 'metaphor', 'simile', 'juxtaposition' etc, obviously in the right context, then they will tick those and reward you for them. Also, you need to engage with the language, so talk about general themes, but make sure you focus in on the language as well to score higher in AO2. When using critics, try to engage with them rather than just quoting them - for example you could use their opinion to try and shape your argument. And lastly, you need to include contextual, so using signpost words which relate to your studied writers will help you to fulfil this. My poet, for example, is Marvell, so I try to use words and phrases like 'Metaphysical', 'Renaissance' and 'The Fall of Man' as often as I can to get marks, without overdoing it. There is no point panicking at this point, so try to relax and do the best you can. Remember that you probably scored highly in your coursework.
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    (Original post by sam_starryeyed)
    Hi guys!
    Im doing the tempest, The rivals and wob but im finding it really hard to get critics for all three to be honest... can anyone help me out? Also my teachers aren't being very helpful with my essays .. I keep getting around 20 and if I get 20 in both essays in the real thing, that's a C and I NEED at least a B in this exam and now im starting to panic! I know my A01 is good and I can structure my essays well, and I put about 8 quotes in my essays and maybe refer to an A04 point once or twice - can anyone give me advice on how to be getting at least 25 ... ?Im not sure if I trust my teachers' marking anyway because they give me 20 and then only tell me that I need to add more quotes but surely I must be doing other things wrong too if im losing 10 marks for it? HELP PLEASE (
    The Tempest:

    Samuel Coleridge
    • "Caliban is in some respects a noble being: the poet has raised him far above contempt."
    James Lovell
    • "The whole play, indeed, is a succession of illusions"
    George Lamming
    • "Prospero is an imperialist by circumstance, a sadist by disease, and above all an old man in whom envy and revenge are equally matched..."
    George Lamming
    • "Caliban is Prospero's convert, colonised by language, and excluded by language."
    Brian Vickers
    • "The Tempest is now unfortunately reduced to an allegory about colonialsim."

    WOB:

    Arthur Lindley
    • Readings which present a feminist or anti-feminist Alysoun or Chaucer, or any other single diagnosis, ‘share a tendency to reduce one of the most ambiguous, “dialogic” texts in our literature to a “monologic” right reading.

    Malone - (In regards to the viewing the Wife as a protofeminist / challenging society)
    • 'modern men of learning with extraordinary naivete have read into the Canterbury tales'

    Malone - (Wife's arguments on marriage)
    • 'To...all the other pilgrims these views are merely amusing and need no refutation'

    Slade -(Sexual immorality of friars in the tale)
    • 'those places which the friars are 'blessing with their presence' because women will be found in them'

    Slade -
    • In the Wife's eyes, it is the domination of the man over the woman which is the knight's real offence'

    Townsend -
    • the Wife's tale is an 'expression of her hopes and dreams'


    Speirs - (Destructive presence of the church in the Wife's tale)
    • 'the ancient nature religion of Britain as been desecrated, uprooted and supplanted by the new ecclesiastical order'

    Gerould - (The levity of the Wife's Tale, would not be taken seriously by contemporaries)
    • 'grotesque absurdity of beginning a tale of 'gentilesse' with rape'

    Strohm -
    • 'The pilgrims gathered at the Tabard Inn seem intended to represent neither a complete census of fourteenth century English society nor an enumeration of its most influential ranks'

    Kittredge - (Wife adopting the role of a clerk)
    • She has handled a hard subject that properly belongs to scholars. She has quoted authorities, too, like a clerk. Such things, he [The Friar] says, are best left to ecclesiastics'

    D.W. Robertson
    • Robertson believes that the Wife is presented as a ‘carnal monster’. Chaucer’s audience, Robertson claims, would have recognised her distortions of scripture, in detail and with disgust. They would have noticed, for instance, the way her use of the example of Solomon and his wives ignores the statement in 3 Kings 11 that ‘the women turned away his heart’ from God.

    Jill Mann -Feminizing Chaucer,
    • argues that her tirade" is a simultaneous demonstration both of female bullying and of salutary witness to male oppression."
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    (Original post by binxgillam)
    Panicking is the worst thing to do! Take a breath. You will be fine. It is likely that your teacher is marking you more harshly than the examiner will, but I will give you some general pointers, even though my texts are different to yours. The examiner will mark positively, and be looking for certain criteria, so if you make sure you use, for example, words like 'metaphor', 'simile', 'juxtaposition' etc, obviously in the right context, then they will tick those and reward you for them. Also, you need to engage with the language, so talk about general themes, but make sure you focus in on the language as well to score higher in AO2. When using critics, try to engage with them rather than just quoting them - for example you could use their opinion to try and shape your argument. And lastly, you need to include contextual, so using signpost words which relate to your studied writers will help you to fulfil this. My poet, for example, is Marvell, so I try to use words and phrases like 'Metaphysical', 'Renaissance' and 'The Fall of Man' as often as I can to get marks, without overdoing it. There is no point panicking at this point, so try to relax and do the best you can. Remember that you probably scored highly in your coursework.
    So what kind of contextual words would you suggest for Shakespeare? I'm doing King Lear if that helps.
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    (Original post by TSR_Monique)
    So what kind of contextual words would you suggest for Shakespeare? I'm doing King Lear if that helps.

    Well 'tragedy' is an obvious one. I don't know much about the play, could you talk about Lear as a tragic hero? You can also refer to the classical tradition of tragedy, and the notion of a 'downfall', as a result of a 'tragic flaw'. My contextual points are much more specific for Shakespeare, as I am doing Antony and Cleopatra, so I am less able to help you on this one. You could refer to the play in performance, and talk about the Globe? It sounds obvious, but they are looking for obvious points. I just read that the play is based on the Leir of Briton, so you could talk about that as an influence? I also often compare A&C to other Shakespeare tragedies, such as Julius Caesar, maybe you could compare King Lear (briefly, obviously you don't want to focus on it) to Macbeth or Hamlet? Shakespeare was also writing during the Renaissance, so when talking about any classical influence on his work that's a useful signpost word. Good luck
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    Would it be possible for anyone to post an example of a comparative essay of Wife of Bath and Tis Pity.

    Reps for life if you can
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    (Original post by J.Star)
    The Tempest:

    Samuel Coleridge
    • "Caliban is in some respects a noble being: the poet has raised him far above contempt."
    James Lovell
    • "The whole play, indeed, is a succession of illusions"
    George Lamming
    • "Prospero is an imperialist by circumstance, a sadist by disease, and above all an old man in whom envy and revenge are equally matched..."
    George Lamming
    • "Caliban is Prospero's convert, colonised by language, and excluded by language."
    Brian Vickers
    • "The Tempest is now unfortunately reduced to an allegory about colonialsim."

    WOB:

    Arthur Lindley
    • Readings which present a feminist or anti-feminist Alysoun or Chaucer, or any other single diagnosis, ‘share a tendency to reduce one of the most ambiguous, “dialogic” texts in our literature to a “monologic” right reading.

    Malone - (In regards to the viewing the Wife as a protofeminist / challenging society)
    • 'modern men of learning with extraordinary naivete have read into the Canterbury tales'

    Malone - (Wife's arguments on marriage)
    • 'To...all the other pilgrims these views are merely amusing and need no refutation'

    Slade -(Sexual immorality of friars in the tale)
    • 'those places which the friars are 'blessing with their presence' because women will be found in them'

    Slade -
    • In the Wife's eyes, it is the domination of the man over the woman which is the knight's real offence'

    Townsend -
    • the Wife's tale is an 'expression of her hopes and dreams'


    Speirs - (Destructive presence of the church in the Wife's tale)
    • 'the ancient nature religion of Britain as been desecrated, uprooted and supplanted by the new ecclesiastical order'

    Gerould - (The levity of the Wife's Tale, would not be taken seriously by contemporaries)
    • 'grotesque absurdity of beginning a tale of 'gentilesse' with rape'

    Strohm -
    • 'The pilgrims gathered at the Tabard Inn seem intended to represent neither a complete census of fourteenth century English society nor an enumeration of its most influential ranks'

    Kittredge - (Wife adopting the role of a clerk)
    • She has handled a hard subject that properly belongs to scholars. She has quoted authorities, too, like a clerk. Such things, he [The Friar] says, are best left to ecclesiastics'

    D.W. Robertson
    • Robertson believes that the Wife is presented as a ‘carnal monster’. Chaucer’s audience, Robertson claims, would have recognised her distortions of scripture, in detail and with disgust. They would have noticed, for instance, the way her use of the example of Solomon and his wives ignores the statement in 3 Kings 11 that ‘the women turned away his heart’ from God.

    Jill Mann -Feminizing Chaucer,
    • argues that her tirade" is a simultaneous demonstration both of female bullying and of salutary witness to male oppression."
    I LOVE YOU FOREVER YOU DONT KNOW HOW LONG IVE BEEN LOOKING FOR CRITICS!! Where did you find theses?!
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    (Original post by binxgillam)
    It depends on what poem you choose to write about, because there are thematic links but also some quite strong links between the language. E.G you can compare 'A Picture Of Little TC' with Volpone, because both present virtuous characters fighting against lust or, as Marvell puts it 'Wanton Love'. You can also compare 'To His Coy Mistress' with Volpone's attempted seduction of Celia. When talking about faith/veneration you can compare the PURITY of the drop of dew's faith in heaven with the BASENESS of Volpone's veneration for his gold - "Thou being the best of things, and far transcending/All style of joy in children, parents, friends/Or any other waking dream on earth". There is also a brilliant link between Volpone's language after he sees Celia - 'O, I am wounded!' and the language about Juliana in 'Damon The Mower' - 'Only for him no cure is found/Whom Juliana's eyes do wound'. Thus a link of them being WOUNDED by their love for a woman - which has themes of MISOGYNY and LUST and is also influenced by classical tradition.
    Hope this helps! xx
    HI! your points are really good!
    I'm finding it very difficult to compare between both the texts and would be eternally grateful if you can post a few more points for comparisons!

    x
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    (Original post by sam_starryeyed)
    I LOVE YOU FOREVER YOU DONT KNOW HOW LONG IVE BEEN LOOKING FOR CRITICS!! Where did you find theses?!
    Some of them I just stumbled across on the internet, but most of them were posted by someone else earlier in this thread
 
 
 
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