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    Any suggestions?

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    (Original post by Pier Paolo)
    Any suggestions?

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    Bristol: dont worry about the new uni. Its in Herfeford, not well known and in middle of nowhere.

    Manchester: not a campus uni but solid reputation. The electronic dept is in city centre and you should be aware that it is full of bars and attracts the gay population to this part( not that i am saying it is wrong).

    Bath: beautiful city, big accomodation problems for year 2 onwards. But again a very good British uni overall. Always in top ten British uni league

    Southampton: best for this degree. If you get it take it

    My choice order would be

    Soton, Manchester, Bristol, Bath
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    Thank your for your advice.

    Can you tell me what are the reasons why you have chosen this order?
    In fact now I am undecided between Manchester and Bristol, since that the Entry Requirements of the second one are a bit lower.

    My concerning about Bristol are principally regarding some stereotypes of the students that attend this Uni, and this new Private University, which will do only Engineering and Technology.

    Furthermore, can someone tell me how much difference there is for this course in Southampton and Manchester?

    My main interest is choose the university that will give me a better job perspective, I don't have any important preference of city or of any other factor.

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    (Original post by Pier Paolo)
    Thank your for your advice.

    Can you tell me what are the reasons why you have chosen this order?
    In fact now I am undecided between Manchester and Bristol, since that the Entry Requirements of the second one are a bit lower.

    My concerning about Bristol are principally regarding some stereotypes of the students that attend this Uni, and this new Private University, which will do only Engineering and Technology.

    Furthermore, can someone tell me how much difference there is for this course in Southampton and Manchester?

    My main interest is choose the university that will give me a better job perspective, I don't have any important preference of city or of any other factor.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Comes down to personal preference but if you're talking about your insurance choice, I'd definitely put Bristol as second. It has excellent EE links, certainly what I looked for when I applied. Bearing in mind I didn't even apply to 4 of the universities you applied to, I would put S'ton as 1st then Bristol.
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    (Original post by OhRickiursofine)
    I'm a first year doing EEE at Soton, feel free to ask me any questions! I was in your position last year, so I thought I'd help you guys out, as those in the year above did for me
    Hi, firstly gotta give my appreciation for taking your time out to help us undergrads here

    Im applying to EEE, And to Soton aswell, i have a few queries in regards to your first year, firstly what a levels did you take? I unfortunately did not take further maths, how disadvantaged will i be to my peers, and therefore it brings the question how much maths would you say is in the course, Is the A2 to Degree level a large jump?

    Additionally how much programming do you feel is in the course, Im proficient with Python and have explored a bit of C and Java, Is First Year EEE more weighted on theory or practical lab work or programming?. A general percentage split would be useful.

    Sorry for all the questions, if you can answer even one id appreciate
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    I'm a third year EE student in Canada who might be transferring to a school in the UK (Looking at Strathclyde, Edinburgh and Glasgow).

    I was wondering if any EE students would be able to share some of their course work with me (eg: practice final or homework assignment) so I can get a sense of what I'd be in for if I switched.

    I've looked at some course descriptions but a list of course objectives or a textbook reference doesn't necessarily give me a sense of how difficult the course will be or what level of understanding I need going into it.

    Or if anyone can point me someplace where I'd have better luck.
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    So you consider Bristol better than Manchester for this course?

    And what about Leeds?
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    Pier Paolo

    Is the universities are in the top 20 in the league tables you should not get too worried about standards and job prospects. Go by the higher ranking uni. Thats what rankings are for.

    But as a international student you should also pay attention to transport links and finances. Avoid obvious expensive places if you cannot afford the rents. London rent is high. Leeds not so much. Is there a convenient airport nearby the uni should also be a priority question for you. Does it fly to an airport in your country. These should be important considerations. For eg Bristol airport has good EZY links to europe. Check that out. Dont get too involved in academic considerations. After all remeber uni empties out during the holiday periods and you will be alone most of that period.
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    (Original post by OhRickiursofine)
    Good luck! I went to an EDT Headstart Southampton summer school when I was in Year 12 so I already knew what the university and the department was like. Mind you when I went they had the old labs and now they have the new ones (opened this September), so it looks even better!

    In terms of the course I knew it was going to be a lot of work, but I didn't really think about it. Now that I'm here I can confirm there's a lot of work. But it's manageable, and you learn a lot of valuable skills straight from the get-go, so it doesn't feel like what you're learning is pointless.

    I still have time to go on nights out which is great, and the bus links are really good so it's easy to get around the city.
    Thanks.

    Wow that sounds amazing. I don't mind a heavy workload, especially if it's manageable. Thanks again for replying, just hoping that Southampton give me an offer now.
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    (Original post by Formless)
    Hi, firstly gotta give my appreciation for taking your time out to help us undergrads here

    Im applying to EEE, And to Soton aswell, i have a few queries in regards to your first year, firstly what a levels did you take? I unfortunately did not take further maths, how disadvantaged will i be to my peers, and therefore it brings the question how much maths would you say is in the course, Is the A2 to Degree level a large jump?

    Additionally how much programming do you feel is in the course, Im proficient with Python and have explored a bit of C and Java, Is First Year EEE more weighted on theory or practical lab work or programming?. A general percentage split would be useful.

    Sorry for all the questions, if you can answer even one id appreciate
    Haha you're welcome.

    Okay so I did A2 Maths, Physics, and Chemistry. I took AS Economics in year 12, and AS Further Maths in Year 13. I found that those who did Further Maths up to A2 were familiar with a lot of the maths we're currently doing, but then again if you haven't done it, it's not a huge step up. If you have time, you could borrow an FP1 textbook and gloss over it. Having some knowledge of matrices, the additional calculus, and the info on complex numbers in FP1 would be useful. The complex numbers were probably the most important, as you use them in the circuits module when you look at AC circuits, so if you only have time to learn about one topic, make sure it's complex numbers!

    The maths module in the first year is self-taught. You're given a textbook, an accompanying reading guide that has questions and explanations, and a solutions book. The content is split up into about 20-ish topics, and in the reading guide it explains what is in the topic, outlines some sections of the textbook for you to read and gives you some example questions. Once you've learnt the topic, you then take a mini-test on it (only like 20 minutes) and you give it to a PhD student who marks it in front of you and gives you feedback. The idea is that you do this once a week, but if you want to move ahead you could do a few a week which would leave you with lots of free time! It's quite good, I like it as I can learn at my own pace. The jump for me was less than the jump from gcse to A-level.

    That amount of programming experience sounds good to me!

    Hmm okay, the split on the marks depends on what module. If you look at the Soton website for EEE, you see that you take the following modules: Electronic Circuits (Semester 1), Programming (Semester 1), Digital Systems and Microprocessors (Semester 1), Electrical Materials and Fields (Semester 1&2), Maths (Semester 1&2), and then the ones in semester 2 that I can't remember off the top of my head. I can only talk about the semester 1 modules anyway as they're the only ones I've done so far.

    So for maths, each topic test is 1%, you take a test in January that's 10% on the topics you should have covered in the first semester, and then in the summer you take a test on everything that's 70%.

    In circuits, there's no exam (yay). You have 8 weekly problem sheets totalling 30%, two in-class tests totalling 35%, 20% from various labs, and 15% from the design exercise that happens in January, so I can't comment on that last bit.

    In programming, you have 11 labs (45%), 2 multiple choice tests (40%), and then 15% from the design exercise.

    In digital systems and microprocessors, you have labs (20%), design exercise (10%), 4 problem sheets (10%), and a January exam (60%).

    In electrical materials and fields, you have labs (20%), coursework (5%), in-class test (25%) and a summer exam (50%).

    That's everything except for the modules that run solely in semester 2, phew! Keep in mind that these could change next year.
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    (Original post by OhRickiursofine)
    Haha you're welcome.

    Okay so I did A2 Maths, Physics, and Chemistry. I took AS Economics in year 12, and AS Further Maths in Year 13. I found that those who did Further Maths up to A2 were familiar with a lot of the maths we're currently doing, but then again if you haven't done it, it's not a huge step up. If you have time, you could borrow an FP1 textbook and gloss over it. Having some knowledge of matrices, the additional calculus, and the info on complex numbers in FP1 would be useful. The complex numbers were probably the most important, as you use them in the circuits module when you look at AC circuits, so if you only have time to learn about one topic, make sure it's complex numbers!

    The maths module in the first year is self-taught. You're given a textbook, an accompanying reading guide that has questions and explanations, and a solutions book. The content is split up into about 20-ish topics, and in the reading guide it explains what is in the topic, outlines some sections of the textbook for you to read and gives you some example questions. Once you've learnt the topic, you then take a mini-test on it (only like 20 minutes) and you give it to a PhD student who marks it in front of you and gives you feedback. The idea is that you do this once a week, but if you want to move ahead you could do a few a week which would leave you with lots of free time! It's quite good, I like it as I can learn at my own pace. The jump for me was less than the jump from gcse to A-level.

    That amount of programming experience sounds good to me!

    Hmm okay, the split on the marks depends on what module. If you look at the Soton website for EEE, you see that you take the following modules: Electronic Circuits (Semester 1), Programming (Semester 1), Digital Systems and Microprocessors (Semester 1), Electrical Materials and Fields (Semester 1&2), Maths (Semester 1&2), and then the ones in semester 2 that I can't remember off the top of my head. I can only talk about the semester 1 modules anyway as they're the only ones I've done so far.

    So for maths, each topic test is 1%, you take a test in January that's 10% on the topics you should have covered in the first semester, and then in the summer you take a test on everything that's 70%.

    In circuits, there's no exam (yay). You have 8 weekly problem sheets totalling 30%, two in-class tests totalling 35%, 20% from various labs, and 15% from the design exercise that happens in January, so I can't comment on that last bit.

    In programming, you have 11 labs (45%), 2 multiple choice tests (40%), and then 15% from the design exercise.

    In digital systems and microprocessors, you have labs (20%), design exercise (10%), 4 problem sheets (10%), and a January exam (60%).

    In electrical materials and fields, you have labs (20%), coursework (5%), in-class test (25%) and a summer exam (50%).

    That's everything except for the modules that run solely in semester 2, phew! Keep in mind that these could change next year.
    Gotta hand it to you Ricki, you are a god my friend. Really really appreciate the reply.

    I studied the exact same AS Subjects as you however didnt pick up further maths and instead i took all 4 on to A2 (Regretting not taking FM) That is great literally just want i needed to hear, i was unsure weather lacking Further Maths would be disadvantages moreover i wasn't sure if i should look at the entire FM Syllabus, however you have cleared that up, i will definitely give FP1/2 a look over, sqrt(-1) think it will be very useful

    Thank you soo much for the percentage split on marks, literally cant find a detailed breakdown for EEE like you have just provided, you are too kind. Looks good so far, especially for the programming and digital systems modules and of course looking forward to maths. What module do you feel is the hardest/took most of your time?

    Bit off topic but im curious. What career path do you feel you want to go down, are you leaning towards hardware more than software?, or unless your unsure. Ive heard a few Engineer grads go into finance and quants side of things, I dont think im that much of a sell out... just yet

    Anyways cheers again for the reply!
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    (Original post by Formless)
    Gotta hand it to you Ricki, you are a god my friend. Really really appreciate the reply.

    I studied the exact same AS Subjects as you however didnt pick up further maths and instead i took all 4 on to A2 (Regretting not taking FM) That is great literally just want i needed to hear, i was unsure weather lacking Further Maths would be disadvantages moreover i wasn't sure if i should look at the entire FM Syllabus, however you have cleared that up, i will definitely give FP1/2 a look over, sqrt(-1) think it will be very useful

    Thank you soo much for the percentage split on marks, literally cant find a detailed breakdown for EEE like you have just provided, you are too kind. Looks good so far, especially for the programming and digital systems modules and of course looking forward to maths. What module do you feel is the hardest/took most of your time?

    Bit off topic but im curious. What career path do you feel you want to go down, are you leaning towards hardware more than software?, or unless your unsure. Ive heard a few Engineer grads go into finance and quants side of things, I dont think im that much of a sell out... just yet

    Anyways cheers again for the reply!
    Haha I wouldn't go that far but you're welcome. I personally found the Electrical Materials and Fields module the hardest, in the first semester you go over oscillations. The module that took the most of my time was probably Programming, as I had a lab session for it each week. Each lab requires preparation, that you record in your logbook. The rough guideline is that it should take around 3 hours to complete, so yeah it took a lot of my time.

    I'm unsure at the moment, which was the main reason I picked EEE as opposed to just electrical/electronic. I wouldn't mind experiencing the finance stuff during a summer/Easter internship maybe, just to see what it could offer. My plan is to try out as much as I can, so I have lots of previous experiences to take into account when I decide on what I want to do once I graduate.

    Good luck!
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    Has Cardiff made any offers or interview calls yet
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    (Original post by Pier Paolo)
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Thank you for the response.

    I am really interested in the University of Bath, expecially because it is the only English city that I had the opportunity to visit, during a study experience two years ago. I extremely enjoyed the city and its surrounding and it is also one of the reasons why I decided to apply to this institution.

    My only concern is about its international rankings, in fact both in the QS and in The Times of Higher Education, it is placed far from the top 100 Universities.
    While in the national ones,The University Guide and The Guardian, has been quite always in the top 10 of UK Universities during the last few years in most of the subjects area.

    As an International applicant, this is my only preoccupation.
    Hi there!

    I'm a first year Computer Science student at University of Bath.

    The ranking tables are rather hard to figure out in many instances. Each one is judged in different ways (employability, student satisfaction, etc,).

    Whilst I cannot provide a reason as to why Bath currently lies outside the QS top 100 world universities, what I will say is that it is a very modern university which is making very good progress in the rankings each year.

    You may be interested to know that Bath recently was ranked the top UK university under 50 years old in the world.

    (Source; http://www.topuniversities.com/top-5...=false+search=)

    If you have any questions about the university in general or what life is like at Bath then do not hesitate to contact me.

    Chris
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    Just received an offer from UCL, AAA for MEng Electronic and Electrical Engineering.
    Application sent 26th Nov, UCL Received 27th Nov. Offer made 15th Dec.
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    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Congratulations!
    Do you have recieved any other offers? What are your choices?
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    (Original post by hedgemonkey)
    Has Cardiff made any offers or interview calls yet
    Yes.

    Went to an interview last Friday (11th Dec), received my offer today.
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    (Original post by scrlk)
    Yes.

    Went to an interview last Friday (11th Dec), received my offer today.
    Well done. My bro Just received invite to Cardiff for interview. Why is it that they are all calling for interviews?

    What can he expect at the cardiff visit day. Any info will be appreciated. Thanks
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    Can anyone offer some advice plz?

    I'm stuck on deciding to apply to imperial or ucl. Both have pros and cons.
    Any advice?
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    (Original post by Jonnyss)
    Can anyone offer some advice plz?

    I'm stuck on deciding to apply to imperial or ucl. Both have pros and cons.
    Any advice?
    I applied to both. Received offers to both.

    Why can't you just apply to both? Both are respectable universities at the global scale.

    UCL's Engineering department isn't as strong as Imperial's. However at UCL you will learn more practical/employability skills. At Imperial, no doubt you will learn to be an excellent electrical engineer but that is not all what employers are looking for.

    Imperial is situated in the most expensive part of London whereas UCL is situated more towards King's Cross/Euston where commuting is possible so you can live in a cheaper area. Not to say Imperial isn't commutable, but you'll tend to live in more expensive places.

    With Imperial you will have access to excellent facilities in terms of electrical engineering. With UCL the facilities aren't as nice but they're definitely on par to create excellent students. Bear in mind that the London Centre for Nanotechnology is at UCL which is shared between Imperial and UCL anyway.
 
 
 
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