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    (Original post by gagaslilmonsteruk)
    I don't think there should be an upper one, but I think we should look at introducing a lower one - I think that 14 should be a good age, as a) I rarely ever see questions or threads aimed at KS3 or earlier b) Some of the content - particularly in health and relationships - is a bit mature, some are actually quite detailed IMHO.
    I do think that's a reasonable question; has a lower age limit ever been in place? Or can anyone of any age join?
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    I'm 21 so not old but I'm at a different place in my life to most students, got a child, pay bills cant go out getting drunk all the time. I'd say I'm mature but some times I do like the studenty late teens- early 20's banter that takes place here I think it's brilliant that all ages take part, you can get advice from older people who have a LOT more life experience it kind of balances the discussion out.
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    No I don't think there should be an age limit on who can join as being a student and going to college/uni doesn't have have an age limit. Its good to have someone who has maybe studied a whole range of subjects and can help those who are going to go down the same path. I'm 22 and I still see me using TSR when I'm 30 if its still up and running. I like a lot of older music and movies so its also nice having older people on here to talk about those subjects too

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    I don't think there should be an age limit. I do think interest in posting on here would naturally decrease as someone gets older and is no longer a student. I've just graduated but I imagine when I'm working full time I won't come on her much anymore.
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    I'm no longer a student but this forum is the one I keep coming back to. Tsr is just so social and accepting and I think that is largely down to the fact that there is no upper age limit.

    And I hope there never is, I mean everyone has been in education at some point and therefore has wisdom and experiences they can share on here ....It's 'the student forum' not 'the students currently in education, graduates and parents of current students forum'

    It's also a great place where people of all ages can have a natter without it looking peodo-y :rofl:

    I know sounds like I have a major crush on tsr :lolwut:

    I do :mmm:
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    (Original post by LavenderBlueSky88)
    I don't think there should be an age limit. I do think interest in posting on here would naturally decrease as someone gets older and is no longer a student. I've just graduated but I imagine when I'm working full time I won't come on her much anymore.
    My time at university was the time where I was least interested in going on TSR. I've always seen it as an invaluable resource for researching getting into uni and different courses and so on, and came back while feeling isolated on a year abroad and saw something which made me want to do a different degree, so ever since I have simply been here while working up to getting onto that degree course. I think I'll hang around more while doing that course (if I get in) because I'll be doing it in Denmark and will therefore appreciate some connection to students doing it in the UK, but yeah, I did not really get anything out of TSR while I was a university student (until the year abroad) personally.
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    Also I don't think it necessary to even have any connection to students of any kind to join here. I joined because I liked the motoring forum on here compared to other motoring forums on the Internet.

    To me it feels like tsr is more of a general forum with all it's different topics but more regulated. Imagine if YouTube was a forum.....

    Ok this just feels like I'm trying to justify why I'm here if I'm not a student anymore haha

    + 1 for 'just a dad' for creating this thread....it's interesting to see the opinions of other tsr users, students or non students on this topic
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    (Original post by nemothefish19)

    + 1 for 'just a dad' for creating this thread....it's interesting to see the opinions of other tsr users, students or non students on this topic
    Thank you. TBH, I was a little nervous about how it would be received, however my fears have been shown to be largely groundless.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    Nope. If anyone tried to tell me what to do with my life they wouldn't be in it any longer. This is MY life and I'll make MY OWN decisions.
    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    I don't always want people to help me. How hard is it for people to mind their own business?
    and other similar posts ...

    Had an interesting conversation today, and thought of you guys. Entirely co-incidental to this thread, but you might find it interesting.

    A work acquaintance of my partner has recently returned to work following an absence of quite a few weeks. She's early twenties, lives in the family home but is otherwise independent and seems like a very self-assured and (over?) confident young woman.

    Anyhow, my partner asked her where she had been. Turns out that she had been on holiday but had the misfortune to suffer a burst appendix whilst she was away. Not nice. The interesting learn for her was that she had booked the holiday independently, with no input from her parents or other family members, with her father's sole duty to be the unpaid airport taxi. On the day before she was due to fly he asked her what insurance arrangements she had made, to which she replied that she "hadn't bothered with that". Leaving aside the stupidity of her decision making, this escalated into a major row with the daughter doing the "my life, my rules, I can make my own decisions" thing and the father getting incredibly frustrated with her intransigence and stubbornness. In the end the only way it was resolved was by him sorting out the insurance and paying for it himself, much to the daughter's annoyance. Apparently it got very ugly.

    A week later she was in a non-EU hospital with a ruptured appendix.

    Something to be said for receiving advice. Even if it isn't wanted.
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    (Original post by just a dad)
    and other similar posts ...

    Had an interesting conversation today, and thought of you guys. Entirely co-incidental to this thread, but you might find it interesting.

    A work acquaintance of my partner has recently returned to work following an absence of quite a few weeks. She's early twenties, lives in the family home but is otherwise independent and seems like a very self-assured and (over?) confident young woman.

    Anyhow, my partner asked her where she had been. Turns out that she had been on holiday but had the misfortune to suffer a burst appendix whilst she was away. Not nice. The interesting learn for her was that she had booked the holiday independently, with no input from her parents or other family members, with her father's sole duty to be the unpaid airport taxi. On the day before she was due to fly he asked her what insurance arrangements she had made, to which she replied that she "hadn't bothered with that". Leaving aside the stupidity of her decision making, this escalated into a major row with the daughter doing the "my life, my rules, I can make my own decisions" thing and the father getting incredibly frustrated with her intransigence and stubbornness. In the end the only way it was resolved was by him sorting out the insurance and paying for it himself, much to the daughter's annoyance. Apparently it got very ugly.

    A week later she was in a non-EU hospital with a ruptured appendix.

    Something to be said for receiving advice. Even if it isn't wanted.
    Just because I don't let people tell me what to do with my life doesn't mean I'm stupid.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    Just because I don't let people tell me what to do with my life doesn't mean I'm stupid.
    I think you may have missed the point of my post. Anyhow, I only offered it as something that you might find helpful in your own self development, although I do accept that in so doing I have probably annoyed you.
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    (Original post by just a dad)
    Really? I work with and advise people much younger than me, why would "actively engaging in discussions" with them be "a bit odd"? I'm not trying to be difficult, just interested in why you feel that way.

    As a graduate I don't fall into the latter category, but I can see why a parent of a first-time undergraduate might want to ask questions on TSR. Is that not reasonable?

    NB I see that you have edited since I commenced my reply!
    I am in full support of older people being on here

    But surely the first time undergraduate can come and ask questions themselves? If they can't surely they shouldn't be going to uni?
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    I am bursting to post something on this thread that will land me in a whole heap of trouble.
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    (Original post by DCFCfan4eva)
    But surely the first time undergraduate can come and ask questions themselves? If they can't surely they shouldn't be going to uni?
    Of course.
    The parent won't necessarily be asking on behalf of their son or daughter, they are more likely to be interested in learning for themselves. Particularly if they, personally, have no previous connection with Uni life.
    I don't think that's unreasonable, as I have previously mentioned I have responded to a couple of 'concerned or confused parents' type posts.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    I am bursting to post something on this thread that will land me in a whole heap of trouble.
    I'm intrigued.
    Surely there must be an 'appropriate' way for you to respond?
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    (Original post by just a dad)
    I'm intrigued.
    Surely there must be an 'appropriate' way for you to respond?
    Not in this case, sorry.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    Not in this case, sorry.
    This just makes me want to know even more!
 
 
 
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