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Which graduates are most likely to make 50k+ in their careers? Watch

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    (Original post by will2348)
    I'm sure the guy above was referring to front office roles. I could be wrong here so do correct me, but I'd bet your friends are working at GS in middle/back office roles?

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    I honestly can't say since I have no interest in investment banking...so I can't comment on that.

    But they were both on something like £33k for placement and starting salary was higher than that...idk if that is any use to you :/
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    (Original post by Crystalz)
    Sarcasm or...?
    Nah its true. You can get alot in tips working at starbucks bro.
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    (Original post by miml)
    1. Extremely.
    2. For the first 2/3 years... Excel/Powerpoint work. Build models, pitch books. (This is M&A, there's lots of different roles in an investment bank, and investment banking refers to a number of things).
    3. Not gonna lie, probably not. Even the least prestigious banks focus their recruitment on Oxbridge, Warwick, UCL, Imperial, LSE. Other red bricks like Bristol/Notts etc get a look in but the vast majority are going to be from those top 6 'target' unis.

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=259237 for more info.
    Thanks


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    (Original post by will2348)
    True, but your pay is relatively static in dentistry. It isn't in banking. As you get more senior, the hours gradually go down and the pay goes up.

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    I mean, most dentists go onto opening their own practice or specialising but even then they'll be on 100-150k, no where near a banker. I think its a pretty good compromise though.
    It completely depends on the individual. Banking is very cut throat, dog eat dog.
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    I honestly can't say since I have no interest in investment banking...so I can't comment on that.

    But they were both on something like £33k for placement and starting salary was higher than that...idk if that is any use to you :/
    I reckon it's probably something like Finance or Operations on that salary. That's still good to get into GS though however those roles are less competitive. And I think GS do target Bath for those roles ^. Congrats to them though.

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    (Original post by alevelzzz)
    I mean, most dentists go onto opening their own practice or specialising but even then they'll be on 100-150k, no where near a banker. I think its a pretty good compromise though.
    It completely depends on the individual. Banking is very cut throat, dog eat dog.
    True, you should really go with what you are interested in. I can't ever imagine being that excited/passionate enough about dentistry to be honest but I know plenty of other people would be.

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    Anything else I can do with an economics degree that'll pay well? As I probably won't get into investment banking


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    (Original post by Slim Shady 96)
    Anything else I can do with an economics degree that'll pay well? As I probably won't get into investment banking


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    Absolutely:

    - Bank of England: Central Banking; Financial Stability; Monetary Analysis; Prudential Regulation; Economic Research; Markets etc.
    - Big 4: Audit, Tax, Corporate Finance, Consulting etc.
    - Industry: Join a corporate in Internal Finance or anything else that takes your fancy
    - IB: Work for an IB but in a less competitive role such as Risk, Technology, Operations or Finance etc.

    Plenty of options open to you - check them out. You've got more roles than you think available for you, explore early, get as many insights and experience under your belt early on.

    Roles above start usually on just over 30k+ but varies from firm to firm and division.

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    (Original post by will2348)
    Absolutely:

    - Bank of England: Central Banking; Financial Stability; Monetary Analysis; Prudential Regulation; Economic Research; Markets etc.
    - Big 4: Audit, Tax, Corporate Finance, Consulting etc.
    - Industry: Join a corporate in Internal Finance or anything else that takes your fancy
    - IB: Work for an IB but in a less competitive role such as Risk, Technology, Operations or Finance etc.

    Plenty of options open to you - check them out. You've got more roles than you think available for you, explore early, get as many insights and experience under your belt early on.

    Roles above start usually on just over 30k+ but varies from firm to firm and division.

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    Thanks, sounds promising, if I do medicine I'll probably have to do graduate medicine or with a foundation year, I don't mind doing dentistry either but that's probably even more competitive so is it worth my time doing medicine as a graduate or doing a foundation year?? Or should just do economics as by the time I become a doctor/dentist I'll get paid as much anyways?


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    The ones who start their own businesses.
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    (Original post by will2348)
    True, you should really go with what you are interested in. I can't ever imagine being that excited/passionate enough about dentistry to be honest but I know plenty of other people would be.

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    I think dentistry mixes a load of things together which is why people like it, cant think of another job like it.
    Helping people, great working hours, self employed/autonomous, very stable, high status, good salary, scope for a 'business' side, artistic etc.
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    (Original post by Slim Shady 96)
    Thanks, sounds promising, if I do medicine I'll probably have to do graduate medicine or with a foundation year, I don't mind doing dentistry either but that's probably even more competitive so is it worth my time doing medicine as a graduate or doing a foundation year?? Or should just do economics as by the time I become a doctor/dentist I'll get paid as much anyways?


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    Well, you shouldn't base your decision on money alone which very much seems like what you're doing at the moment.

    Sit down and have a think about what you actually want to do with your life and what you like doing.

    Everything mentioned requires a strong degree of 'I really want this more than anything' or 'I really like parts of this' if you are to succeed.

    I think you need to do more research. You can't go into a degree like medicine/dentistry without being fully committed to it. You can with economics but if you want to be successful at a job, you actually have to like at least some of what you are doing. In fact, you need to be so proactive, relentless and determined to get onto all the internships etc., make yourself stand out and really want it that you must pick something you genuinely want to do.

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    (Original post by alevelzzz)
    I think dentistry mixes a load of things together which is why people like it, cant think of another job like it.
    Helping people, great working hours, self employed/autonomous, very stable, high status, good salary, scope for a 'business' side, artistic etc.
    Agreed - never really thought or looked into it like that to be honest.

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    (Original post by will2348)
    Well, you shouldn't base your decision on money alone which very much seems like what you're doing at the moment.

    Sit down and have a think about what you actually want to do with your life and what you like doing.

    Everything mentioned requires a strong degree of 'I really want this more than anything' or 'I really like parts of this' if you are to succeed.

    I think you need to do more research. You can't go into a degree like medicine/dentistry without being fully committed to it. You can with economics but if you want to be successful at a job, you actually have to like at least some of what you are doing. In fact, you need to be so proactive, relentless and determined to get onto all the internships etc., make yourself stand out and really want it that you must pick something you genuinely want to do.

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    No it's not just about the money, I would like to either do something in banking/finance or medicine, these are the 2 things I happen to like not just cause they pay the most
    When I decide out of the 2 which I want to do then I'll look out for internships/experience


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    (Original post by Slim Shady 96)
    No it's not just about the money, I would like to either do something in banking/finance or medicine, these are the 2 things I happen to like not just cause they pay the most
    When I decide out of the 2 which I want to do then I'll look out for internships/experience


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    Well, put it this way:

    You can break into banking having studied medicine.

    You can't break into medicine having studied economics/finance.

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    Accounting and Finance, Economics, Mathematics
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    (Original post by Frank the Tankk)
    Computer Science...provided you study at a prestigious university, are passionate (dedicated to learning every in-demand language etc.) and go to London/Dublin/anywhere with a decent tech. industry. A lot of graduates also get into investment banking - especially in London.

    However, if you go to a Post-92 university and don't have any passion for it...say goodbye to any hopes of having a decent job (as shown by CompSci having the largest unemployment rates)
    University is virtually irrelevant in CS. God knows what my uni's rank is, but the modernised portion of the tech industry (Facebook, Google, ARM, Samsung, Qualcomm, Valve, etc.) and even the barely modernised companies like GE and IBM are all well aware that university is not a particularly accurate indicator of talent. It literally only takes passion and some charisma during interviews (you also certainly do not need to learn every in-demand language, and often you'll be put on projects with a language you've never used before).
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    Assuming you may achieve more than 50k, but still you wont enjoy the full extent of that value. Realistically speaking tax here in the uk is absymal (more likely 35-50% if you reach that benchmark) and ofc mortage (if youre planning to buy a house) and daily expenses, uni loans, perhaps there might be more liabilities than assets you have.
    So lets not have a huge deal about it and not wonder on a six figure number.
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    (Original post by will2348)
    Well, put it this way:

    You can break into banking having studied medicine.

    You can't break into medicine having studied economics/finance.

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    Truuuuuuuu
    If you had both degrees what would you pick? Not choosing by what you like or interested in (you can if you want) but in stats like salary, job security, lifestyle etc


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    (Original post by Slim Shady 96)
    Truuuuuuuu
    If you had both degrees what would you pick? Not choosing by what you like or interested in (you can if you want) but in stats like salary, job security, lifestyle etc


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I'd go with the second option just because that's what I'm interested in. And even though the job security may be less, I'd probably be happier doing that and there are plenty of options within that scope. However, if you're not at a highly ranked university, it might actually be better to do medicine.

    I reckon if you did a statistical analysis, lifestyle, job security and salary is probably better for those in medicine on average with less variance. Whereas, in economics, the variance is high with a minority doing extremely well.

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